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Think not that God deserts the field, 

Though Truth the battle loses; 
But grasp again Faith's sword and shield, 

And follow where He chooses. 
He shrouds Himself in dark events, 

No mortal eye beholds Him; 
And many an adverse providence. 

As in a cloud, enfolds Him. 

We see Truth's foes closing around, 

Distrusting her resources; 
Faith fills the teeming battle=ground 

With chariots and with horses. 
And /o, God's Standard rises clear 

Amid the smoke and thunder; 
Embattled armies disappear. 

Or into fragments sunder. 

Soldiers of Christ, take heart again, 

Fear not dark portents solemn, 
God moves across the battle^plain 

In many an unseen column. 
The very stars of the blue night. 

As they fulfill their courses, 
Shall wheel obedient in the fight, 

And add them to our forces. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 
221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE— Pel year, in advance, $ 1 .00; three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

DISCONTlNtANCES— We find that a large number of our sub- 
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and their files broken in case they fail to remit before 
expiration. IT IS THEREFORE ASSUMED, UN- 
LESS NOTIFICATION TO DISCONTINUE IS RE- 
CEIVED, THAT THE SUBSCRIBER WISHES TO 
HAVE THE CYNOSURE CONTINUED. Notification 
to discontinue at expiration can be sent in at any time 
during the year. 

PRESENTATION COPIES- Many persons subscribe for THE 
CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE to be sent to friends. In 
such cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a 
present and not regularly authorized by the recipient, 
we will make a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, 
and to send no bill for the ensuing year. 



CONTENTS. 



Annual Meeting — Official Call 1 

The Nati(ynal Convention of tbe N. C. A. . . 1 
"God Is my Refuge." By Rev. H. H. 

Hinmau 1 

A Good Ministerial Example. By Rev. 

William Brenner 8 

Shriner Jurors in Thaw Trial 4 

Vice President a Shriner 4 

Mackey's Encyclopedia of Freemasonry... 4 
Cartoon — "Can a Mason Travel More 

Safely?" 5 

"The Robber of the Desert" 6 

"Freemasonry Among Pirates" 6 

President Blanchard's Letter 8 

Died After Initiation 12 

The "Court of Honor" *12 

The Lodge Goat 12 

The Church Broader in Charity 12 

Gomperism in Yfashington 13 

Another Notch on the Brake — Massachu- 
setts School Fraternities 13 

Law of Labor 14 

Moody Bible Institute 14 

From Ball to Church Memorial 14 

Decadence of Good Temt>lary 1,5 

Independent Order of Good Templars 15 

Too Much Christianity... 15 

Jonathan Stevens Perham — Obituarj' 16 

Salvation Army and Masonry *16 

Contributions Received by N. C. A 16 

News of Our Work 17 

From Arkansas 17 

Stoddard's Busy Month ,. . 17 

Michigan Agent's Report 19 

From Agent Baxter 20 

Mrs. Wood's Report 21 



Rev. Davidson's Report 21 

From Our Mail 25 

Meaning of Cynosure 26 

Letter to a Minister' on Masonry 27 

A Seceder's Testimony — Mrs. Amanda 

Smith 27 

From Our Exchanges — - 
Why Christ-Rejecting Lodges Flourish 

— Wesleyan Methodist 2S 

That Lodge; A Seceder's Testimony — 

TJte Gospel Witness 28 

Origin of Freemasonry^ — Boston Glohe. 29 
Mysteries of "Red Death" — The Square 

Deal . . 29 

■'I Belong to the Lodge;" Church Ab- 
sentees — California Christian Advo- 
cate 29 

Abolish School Fraternities — Grand . 

Rapids Evening Press 30 

Work of the "Black Hand"— iYetu York 

Evening Sim ' 30 

Know-Nothing Party— 5os^on Globe... 31 



MODERN SECRET SOCIETIES 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., Pres. Wheaton College. 

FEATURES OFTHE BOOK 

An important subject clearly 
and comprehensively handled. 
Is kindly in toncr 0.s dlrvided into 
short, interestiLiO " hapters, and 
is admirably k ci'cted to aid busy 
people. It anstrops the question, 
what Jesus would have one do. 

The Christian Endeavor 
World calls it : 

"AN ILLUMINATING BOOK." 

Plan 0! the Wor3« : Part First 
answers objections, and clears 
away the obstacles to a candid 
consideration of the question. 
Part Second treats of Free- 
masonry as the key to the whole subject. Part 
Third relates to subsidiary orders — industrial, 
insurance, temperance and other lodges. Part 
Fourth considers important questions grow- 
ing out of this discussion, such as: "What Do 
Lodge Burials Teach?" "Does Opposition to 
Lodges Injure the Persons or Churches that 0^ 
fer It? " " The Duty of the Hour," etc. 

300 pages ; cloth, T5 ceits; leather, $1.00. Ad. 
dress all orders to 

NATI0N2L CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



221 West Madison Street, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 

Entered at the Post Office, Chicago. III., at 
second class matte*^ 






'Jesns answered him, — 1 spake openly to Ihe worid; and in secret haTe I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XL. 



CHICAGO, MAY, 1907. 



NUMBER 1. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

Of the National Christian Association, 

June 13 and 14, 1907. 

The annual meeting of tlie National 
Christian Association will occur on 
Thursday and Friday, June 13 and 14, 
1907, at 10 o'clock a. m., in Wheaton 
College, Wheaton, III, for the election of 
officers and the transaction of other im- 
portant business. 

C. A. Blanchard President. 

N. E. Kellogg, Recording Secretary. 



THE NATIONAL CONVENTION. 

Thursday and Friday, June 13 and 14, 

1907. 

The Board of Directors of the National 
Christian Association have appointed 
June 13 and 14 as the time for our An- 
nual Meeting and Convention. The fore- 
noon of each day will be devoted to the 
transaction of business, and the after- 
noons and evenings to addresses and gen- 
eral discussions. It has been decided to 
consider several of the popular religious 
delusions of the day, besides that of the 
world-wide lodge system. Hon. Silas C. 
Swallow, of Pennsylvania, has been in- 
vited to speak upon the lodge. His ac- 
ceptance has not yet been received. Rev. 
A. C. Dixon, D. D., another man of na- 
tional reputation, has agreed to speak 
upon Christian Science. 

The afternoon of the 13th will be given 
up to short addresses by seceders and 
others. We are glad to have heard that 
Rev. James P. Stoddard, Secretary of the 
New England Association ; Rev. H. H. 
Hinman, of Oberlin; Mr. A. J. [Millard, 
of Little Rock, Ark., and friends more or 
less prominent in our work, are expect- 
ing to be with us. 

The convention will be held this year in 
\Mieaton College. Wheaton is practical- 



ly a suburb of Chicago. It can be 
reached by the electric line ; cars between 
Wlieaton and Chicago every half hour. 
It is also situated upon the Chicago and 
Northwestern Railway. Entertainment 
will be given our friends if they will for- 
ward their names to the Cynosure office. 
It will be helpful if they will state wheth- 
er they can remain through both days or 
not. 

Let as many as possible of the friends 
who are not able to be with us, but who- 
will be with us in S3-mpathy and spirit 
and will pray for the convention, also 
write, that we may have a few words 
from them directlv. 



"GOD IS MY REFUGE." 

BY REV. H. H. HINMAX, OBERLIX, OHIO. 

''Trust in the Lord and do good; so 
shalt thou dwell in the land, and verily 
thou shalt be fed." Ps. ^/ :3. 

One of the commonest reasons why 
people join the secret orders is that they 
may have something on which they can 
fall back in case of the failure of some 
of their cherished plans. This is espe- 
cially true of ministers who have a real 
desire to do good, and yet feel that the 
work of the ministry is but ill paid, and 
that they need a better basis of confi- 
dence than the freewill offerings of those 
who profess to be the disciples of Christ, 
but are largely engaged in accumulating 
substance for themselves and their fam- 
ilies. I have known numerous instances 
of this kind. A Congregational minister 
told me that when he left the Seminary 
his views from observation of his breth- 
ren were that their tenure of ministerial 
standing in any community was so un- 
certain, that it was eminently desirable 
that something more secure and reliable 
should be found or which to rest than 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1907, 



the mere approval of the church and 
congregation. He had accordingly unit- 
ed with the Freemasons and Odd Fel- 
lows, that he might have greater confi- 
dence in preaching to the people. 

In many cases a large share of the 
preacher's support is made up from the 
membership of these orders, who are 
thereby assured that his moral support 
will be given to their institutions. I 
do not mean to say that the ministry 
generally are actuated by such consid- 
erations, but only that it is a very posi- 
tive influence among them. 

I think that the conception of minis- 
terial support is entirely wrong; and 
^^•hile I do not hesitate to affirm that it is 
the duty of those who are ministered un- 
to, to minister to their teachers in all 
good things, yet the covenant of the 
minister is with the Lord^ and on Him 
must be his dependence, to Him must 
he look for support. 

AA^hen our Lord sent out the seventy 
to preach His gospel, Fie commanded 
them to take neither purse nor scrip. 
AMien they returned he said, "Lacked ye 
anything?" And they said, ''Nothing, 
Lord." Admitting that the conditions of 
support are different, yet the source of 
supply is still in God, as truly as then. 
He says to His people now, "Trust in 
the Lord and do good ; so shalt thou 
dwell in the land, and verilv thou shalt 
be fed." 

The world is full of examples of God's 
providential care over His faithful peo- 
ple. A case in point is that of the presi- 
dent of Wheaton College, Rev. C. A. 
Blanchard. In his work on "Modern 
Secret Societies," he gives a brief chap- 
ter showing God's wonderful dealings 
with him ; how, commencing as a poor 
student in a feeble and unpopular insti- 
tution, he by his devotion to an unpopu- 
lar reform achieved a wonderful success, 
both for himself and his college, of 
which he has been for many years the 
most acceptable and honored president. 
Fine abilities may account in part for 
this success, but consecration to a right- 
eous but unpopular reform was the great 
factor m his success. 

May I speak briefly of my own ex- 
perience? Deeply impressed with a sense 



of my many failures and shortcomings, 
I can only claim that, as a rule, I have, 
like one of old, ''believed God'' and He 
has "counted it to me for righteousness.'- 
When early in life, I felt called of God 
to give up the profession for which I 
had made preparation and enter the 
work of Christ's ministry, simply as a 
means of doing good, and without any 
promise of support,. I was assured by 
friends that it was the great mistake of 
my life, and that I should feel bitterly 
the consequences. But it was not a mis- 
take. I had a measure of success, both in 
the home and the foreign field, and 
never regretted that I obeyed the heav- 
enly vision. 

When, some years later, the Lord had 
blessed our home with three little ones, 
I felt called of God to give my life to 
the anti-secrecy reform. I was told that 
it would assuredly beggar my family and 
bring nothing but dishonor on my own 
head. 

I was permitted to travel and labor in 
thirty-one States and the District of 
Columbia. I labored more than eighteen, 
years. I had many hardships, but I was 
blessed and sustained in my work. In 
the South, where I was assured no 
Northerner could overcome Southern 
prejudice, I met little but kindness and 
appreciation. I was sustained by gifts 
from such noble men as Deacon Car- 
penter, of Chicago ; Mr. C. W. Sterry, of 
Pontiac, 111., and Mr. J. A. Conant, of 
Willimantic, Conn. 

Our children, who did have to endure 
the trials of poverty, all graduated with 
honor from Oberlin Coflege. Our eldest 
son received the degree of A. M. from 
Harvard University, and has been act- 
ing president of two colleges,, one of 
which is in FoochoW; China, where he is 
a missionary. Our other son, a graduate 
of Oberlin Theological Seminary, is a 
successful pastor in Iowa. Our daugh- 
ter, after three years of missionary work 
in North China, returned to this coun- 
try, where she has engaged in teaching. 
For the last three years she has been at 
home to minister to our personal wants 
in our old age and feebleness, finding 
some leisure for gainful occupation. 

But how about our old age? I liave 



May, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



lived longer than I had any reason to 
expect, having been born May 2, 1822. 
Bnt God has not forgotten us. About 
three years ago, a sister of my former 
wife left a bequest of a little over three 
thousand dollars, the interest of which 
has helped in our support; and within a 
few months past, a brother of the same 
generous giver — a man whom I had seen 
but a few times, and with whom I was 
not at all intimate — left me at his death 
four thousand dollars. So that at least 
we are comfortably provided for, and 
hope to leave something to our children. 
The conclusions at which I arrive 
from the above are, that an unselfish life 
is the only sane and wise one ; second, 
that it is infinitely safer and wiser to 
trust in God than to trust in any 
form of secret society, or any 
combination of people, however benev- 
olent may be their professions, and 
that he who faithfully adheres to the 
cause of righteousness will be "more 
than conc[ueror through Him that loved 
us." 



A GOOD MINISTERIAL EXAMPLE. 

Toledo, Ohio, Janv. 31, 1907. 
W. I. Phillips : ■ ' 

Dear Sir — The lodge question at times 
becomes quite a lively question and es- 
pecially so whenever the minister has the 
courage to raise his voice against secret 
societies, or refuse to officiate at funerals 
or in any way be mixed up in co-opera- 
tion with them. The really sincere and 
intelligent members of his flock will ap- 
preciate his ministerial loyalty and con- 
sistency and commend him for his fear- 
less utterances and firm and uncompro- 
mising stand. Even many ignorant of 
the true nature of the lodge to which 
they belong will speak out boldly and say 
"My Church first ; I can see no wrong in 
the lodge, but if I must choose between 
the two, I will remain with the church 
and let the lodge go." 

This is the incident I wish to relate : 
A certain lady belonging to my church 
had become a member of the Maccabees. 
Her husband wished that on the occasion 
of her funeral I would permit the lodge 
ladies, her sisters, as they are called, to 
attend and officiate according to their 



regular ritualistic exercises. I declined 
on the ground that the name of Christ 
does not occur in any of their prayers. 
Immediately I was pronounced ignorant 
in the matter. 

''Our prayers are all right," said a cer- 
tain lady, who seemingly was very anx- 
ious to have m}^ consent, and to have me 
place no obstacles in the way of what 
"other people looked upon as perfectly 
harmless, and many preachers have no 
scruples in permitting," viz. : the co-op- 
eration of the officials of the lodge with 
ministers in the burial of those \vho hold 
membership both in the church and in 
the lodge. 

Finally it was agreed to go to the pres- 
ident's house, examine the lodge books, 
and, if the name of Christ did not occur 
in any of their prayers, the question 
would be settled without any ill feeling 
on eitlier side. The books were produc- 
ed, the prayers read, but Christ's name 
did not appear. They were chagrined 
and humiliated. But they said there are 
are other books in which they knew pray- 
ers were to be found containing the Sa- 
viour's name, and that they would bring 
them to my house in the evening. TwO' 
ladies came, a Lutheran and a Presby- 
terian. The one who had been presi- 
dent of their societ}- for nine years ap- 
proached me with a book in hand and 
said : 'T guess you are right, and now I 
don't blame you for your opposition to 
the lodge system. Our minister. Rev. 
Robertson, belongs to the lodge, and we 
think he is a good man. At our next 
meeting this question will be discussed. 

^Irs. President, I said, do you know 
that the name of Jesus Christ was inten- 
tionally and purposely omitted from those 
prayers, and that consequentl}- they are 
useless and even blasphemous? "What- 
soever ye shall ask the Father in my 
name He will give it you." "Whosoever 
shall confess me before men, him will I 
also confess before my Father which is 
in heaven, and whosoever shall deny nie 
before men him will I also deny before 
m}' Father which is in heaven." 

After a discussion of more than an 
hour, the ladies departed thanking me 
for the explanation I had given and as- 
suring me that no offense had been given. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 11)07. 



A lodge man said at the hearing of the 
case, "He turned down the ladies. None 
of his predecessors ever did such a thing 
and he cannot do it and make the church 
prosper." 

Without Christ's grace and power we 
can do nothing, but through Christ who 
strengthens us we can do all things. The 
"all things" certainly includes grace and 
power to enable us to refuse co-operation 
with lodge Chaplains as funerals, which 
would be showing disloyalty towards 
Christ. And if we are faithful to Him, 
who has commissioned us to preach the 
truth, we may be sure He will not fail to 
support us and to overrule everything 
for the best, and to reward our sacrifices 
at last with the joys and blessings of His 
kingdom. (Rev.) Wm. Brenner, 

Pastor IMartin Luther Eng. Luth. Ch. 



For the upright man there is a smile 
on the face of God; but for the man 
who wilfully deceives his brethren there 
is a rod in his hand. 



SHRINER JURORS IN THAW TRIAL. 

Three members of the jury which 
tried Harry Thaw were, on April 19, 
summoned before Assistant District At- 
torney Smyth, of New York, for exami- 
nation regarding a statement by one of 
the jurors, that an appeal had been made 
to those jurors who were members of 
the Order of the Mystic Shrine, on the 
ground that Thaw's father was a Shri- 
ller. Dennee, one of the jurors, in his 
statement said that one of the policemen 
on guard at the courthouse had ap- 
proached another juror and whispered 
that Thaw's father w^as a Shriner. In 
this connection it is pointed out that. 
Dennee was the only Shriner on the jury 
who voted for Thaw's acquittal. 



VICE=PRESIDENT A SHRINER. 

The Times-Star of Cincinnati, Ohio, 
h,i its issue of April 15, contains an ac- 
count of the initiation of Vice President 
Charles W. Fairbanks into the mysteries 
of the Mystic Shrine. We suppose that 
this is another step in his preparation as 
a candidate for the Presidency of the 
T'nited States. It will be recalled that 
previous to his election as Vice Presi- 



dent he promised, if elected, to join the 
Masons, which promise he fulfilled, as 
stated in the press dispatches not long- 
after the results cf the campaign be- 
came known. 



"TRUE REFORMERS." 

The colored people have a secret so- 
ciety known as True Reformers, and in 
Washington the order has a building 
with large halls and lodge rooms. Near 
the end of February the front of the 
building was placarded with posters an- 
nouncing for the closing days of the 
month performances of the Mixed Race 
Dramatic Company. 



He who refuses to prevent crime is 
brother to him who commits crime. 



MACKEY'S ENCYCLOPEDIA OF FREE= 
MASONRY. 

Mackey's Encyclopedia of Freennasonry is 
the greatest, most interesting and most in- 
structive Masonic work. It treats every Ma- 
sonic topic and word. The newly revised and 
enlarged edition contains a large addendum 
and a pronouncing dictionary. Full sheep 
binding, 1,080 pages. $5.00; half morocco' 
$6.00 ; full morocco, $7.00. This work is first 
in value and importance as a standard Ma- 
sonic authority, and indispensable to every 
Mason who desires to be thoroughly versed 
in Masonic literature. 

A few of our readers may be interest- 
ed in the above statement made by the 
Masonic Voice Review. Address orders 
to the Cynosure ofiice. 

Is it true that a Mason can travel 
more safely among lawless people, or 
on the high sea, than a non-mason? If 
so, why? 

We quote below two articles, "The 
Robber of the Desert" and "Freemasonry 
among Pirates." These supposed state- 
ments of facts are taken from "The 
Mystic Tie," by Albert G. Mackey, M. 
D., author of a "Lexicon of Freema- 
sonry" ; Grand Secretary and Grand Lec- 
turer of South Carolina ; Secretary Gen- 
eral of the Supreme Council of the 33d 
Degree, for the Southern Jurisdiction of 
the United States; D. G. H. P. of the 
Grand Chapter of South Carolina ; Past 
Master of Solomon's Lodge; Honorary 
Member of Lodge La Clemente Aniitie, 



Mav. IWI 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Paris ; and of Walhalla Lodge, Charles- 
ton." 

Masonry probably never had a more 
voluminous writer, nor one more high- 
ly respected by Freemasons as an author, 
in this country, than Albert G. Mackey. 
He gives in his preface, as a reason for 
relating these facts found in "The Mystic 
Tie," that he has often seen brethren 
placed in situations most unpleasant to 
their own feelings by their inability to 



refer to authentic sources when engaged 
in controversy with the enemies of Free- 
m^asonry. Hence he contributes this 
work towards the advancement of ''that 
institution to which my attachment has 
increased with my knowledge of its prin- 
ciples." 

The duty of the law-abiding ]\Iason to 
deliver his brother robber or pirate, is, 
of course, the plain inference from the 
followinof narratives. — Editor. 




CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1901 



'^THE ROBBER OF THE DESERT." 

""It is now some twenty years since 
Capt. E.. late a member of one of the 
English University Lodges, was travel- 
ing in Egypt. The Captain was accom- 
panied by his servant, an active and in- 
telligent young man ; they were attack- 
ed in the desert b}' the Arabs : the Cap- 
tain made, a very resolute stand, and 
slew two of the robbers. He was, widi 
his servant, soon overpowered, and they 
were conveyed to the robbers' retreat, 
when they were separated. It was deter- 
mined that the Captain's hfe should be 
forfeited, and he awaited his cruel des- 
tiny with as much fortitude as a brave 
raan could feel. Instead of this awful 
sentence, he was, however, agreeably 
surprised in the morning by his servant's 
approach, with the joyful intelligence 
that his sentence was not only remitted, 
but that he was at liberty to resume his 
jcuiney; and this retributive justice was 
accompanied by the restoration of every 
particle of the property of which he had 
previously been plundered. It is to be 
wondered at, that his gratitude to his 
servant ended in his taking early steps 
to claim a nearer association to him as 
a Brother in the Craft, for by the ex- 
change of the mysterious secret, the rol> 
her of the desert had kept his faith with 
a Brother. The servant and the Arab 
were both Masons, and through the 
former the master had received the bene- 
fits of the mystic tie." — ''The Mystic 
Tie,'' by Albert G. Mackey, Secretary 
General of the Supreme Council of the 
33.1 Degree. 



"FREEMASONRY AMONG PIRATES/' 

"In the Freemasons' Quarterly Re- 
view for March, 1845, is contained a 
still more interesting anecdote of the 
sacred estimation in which the Masonic 
tics were held by a pirate. The particu- 
lars were communicated by Brother 
Glen, a member, of the Phoenix Lodge 
at Sunderland, England, at a meeting of 
the Lodge of Instruction, held at the 
George and Vulture tavern, Cornhill, 
London. 

'In the year 1830, Brother Glen, who 
had not, then, been initiated into Ma- 
sonrv, was mate of a merchant vessel, 



which was filled with a general cargo, 
and bound for the Island of Cuba. The 
crew, besides the captain and mate, con- 
sisted of seven seamen ; when, within 
about three days' sail of their port of 
destination, they discovered a suspicious 
looking schooner, apparently hovering in 
their course, and which, from her ap- 
pearance and motions, they were fearful 
wa^ a pirate. Being almost in a defense- 
Ic^.s state, the}- were naturally much 
alarmed, and endeavored, by altering 
their course, to avoid the schooner; but 
she, crowding all sail, bore down quick- 
ly upon them, and brought them to. 
The piratical character of the schooner 
was now but too clearly apparent. The 
merchantman was boarded by twenty- 
five desperadoes, all armed with pistols 
and cutlasses ; against such a numerous 
aiid well-armed force, resistance was out 
oi the question. 

''The captain of the pirate was a Span- 
iard ; he was accompanied by his lieu- 
tenant, who was dressed in a peculiar 
nianner, with tight red pantaloons, and 
Brother Glen conjectured, from his ap- 
pearance, that he was a Maltese. The 
captain, mate, and crew of the mer- 
chantman were immediately seized, pis- 
tols were presented to their heads, and 
they were threatened with instant death, 
unless they immediately gave up all 
money on board. They had scarcely any 
specie, and the pirate captain, being dis- 
satisfied, proceeded to plunder the ves- 
sel of every thing which was valuable 
and portable, and then vowed, with the 
most horrid imprecations that he would 
burn the vessel, and destroy all her crew. 
This rufiian spoke broken English, and 
other pirates spoke in Spanish. The un- 
fortunate crew of the merchantman were 
now bound and secured in the fore part 
of the vessel. The captain and P.rother 
Glen were also tied to two pillars in the 
cabin. 

''The work of plunder was finished, 
and the pirate captain had given direc- 
tions for the destruction of the vessel 
b}' fire ; gunpowder, tar-bafrels, and 
other combustible materials were brought 
from the schooner, and placed on board 
the fated vessel in a manner best cal- 
culated to insure her speedy destruction. 



May, 190' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Whilst these horrible proceedings were 
in progress, the cries and lamentations 
of the unfortunate crew were piteous in 
the extreme; their supplications for 
mercy were, however, entirely disre- 
garded, and the train actually laid. At 
this awful juncture, the lieutenant of the 
pirates, who has before been noticed, 
\vent aft and entered the cabin where 
Brother Glen and his captain were se- 
cured, his purpose being apparently to 
make a further search before leaving 
the vessel, for any thing valuable that 
n;ight previously have escaped observa- 
tion Brother Glen and the captain were, 
as may well be imagined, in a most 
dreadful state of terror and alarm, ex- 
pecting nothing less than instant death, 
and that in its most horrible shape. The 
captain happened, fortunately for himself 
and crew, to be a Mason. As a last 
resource, he attracted the pirate's atten- 
tion, and made the sign of an E. A. ; the 
littler regarded him steadfastly for an 
instant, and replied by making the sign 
of a F. C. 

''Brother Glen was at that time ignor- 
ant of the meaning of these proceedings ; 
but he did not fail to perceive that die 
countenance of his captain, before so 
anxious and terror-stricken, was instant- 
ly lighted up with joy and hope, whilst 
a glance of mutual intelligence passed 
between him and the pirate. Some fur- 
ther communication then passed between 
them ; neither could understand 
the other's language ; but in this 
short interval they had made them- 
selves understood by the universal med- 
ium of Masonry. The lieutenant then 
returned to the deck, where, as it sub- 
sequently appeared, he dissuaded the 
captain of the pirates from his intention 
of burning the vessel, and induced him 
to abandon her and the crew without 
further injury. Shortly afterwards, the 
captain, and greater part of the pirates 
left, the lieutenant and five others re- 
maining on board. The lieutenant went 
again into the cabin, and wrote a short 
r.ote in the Spanish language, which he 
carefully folded up and left upon the 
cabin table ; he then, with a knife cut the 
cords with which Brother Glen had been 
boiuid, and making a gesture of caution. 



left the ship with the remammg portion 
of the pirate's. crew\ Brother Glen 
speedily released the captain, who then 
informed him that he had made himself 
known to the pirate as a Mason, and 
to that circumstance their deliverance 
must be attributed. After waiting, as 
they deemed, a sufficient time to allow 
the schooner to get. out of sight, they 
cautiously proceeded to the deck, and re- 
leased the crew. 

"Their vessel had been completely 
ransacked, and was in a state of the ut- 
most confusion ; they could see the train 
which had been laid for their destruc- 
tion ; they then carefully removed the 
combustibles, and returning thanks for 
their deliverance, again proceeded on 
their course. Nothing particular oc- 
curred until the second day following, 
when, to their utter consternation, they, 
again espied the piratical schooner, 
which bore down upon them as before. 
They hoisted their English colors, when 
the pirate, recognizing the vessel as the 
same which had been recently pillaged, 
merely displayed his black flag, the ter- 
rible ensign of his dreadful calling, which 
he almost immediately lowered, and then 
alteringf his course, stood off without 
offering the merchantman any further 
njolestation, and was seen by them no 
more. 

''On the following, day they arrived in 
port, when Brother Glen and the cap- 
tain made a protest of the circumstances, 
and it was found that the letter, which 
had been left on the cabin table, was 
couched in the following terms : 'Brother 
— Having recognized you as a IMason, I 
liave induced the captain to spare the 
lives of yourself and crew — but for this, 
you would all have perished.' 

'Tt was subsequently discovered, that 
two American vessels had been destroy- 
ed by fire in those seas ; the crews of 
both perished, and, no doubt, under sim- 
ilar circumstances." — ''The Mystic Tie/' 
by Albert G. Mackey, Secretary General 
of the Supreme Council of the 33d De- 
cree. 



If God throws a stumbling-block 
across our path it is because he desires 
us to go around by some other way. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May. lOOl 



PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 

]\I}' Dear Fathers and Brethren — The 
signs of the tmies are encouraging. 
Satan evidently has great wrath. This 
;n itself is proof that liis time is short. 
Revelations 12:12. There are "signs in 
the heavens, and signs in the earth" ; 
"men's hearts fail them for fear" ; there 
are "earthquakes in divers places." W'lien 
sucji days come Ave are charged to lift 
up our heads and rejoice, for the time 
of our redemption draws near. 

I have said to you that Freemasonry 
has this terrible pre-eminence among hu- 
man organizations ; it is the only one 
which has taken the name of Jesus Christ 
out of the Bible. I could not, while the 
Catholic church is what it is, be a Cath- 
olic, but Catholicism never has denied the 
Lord. Spiritualism is a great iniquity, 
but so far as I know it has never laid 
such unholy hands upon the sacred word. 

^^ou do not need to be reminded that 
all of the secret societies of our times 
except the Jesuits, spring from, are 
m_odeled after, and ruled by the P>ee- 
masons ; so that the same spirit of evil 
wiiich led the founders of Freemasonry 
to shut Christ out of its ritual, to omit 
His name from their prayers, and finally 
to expurgate Flis name from the Bible 
itself, is in them all. Here we have the 
great Anti-Christian movement of the 
latter days, offering to furnish a reli- 
gion to the whole human race whicli shall 
bear the externals of Christianity, and 
at the same time put the knife into its 
verv heart. 

For nearly or quite forty years the 
National Christian Association has been 
'leclaring these solemn truths to a gen- 
eration which seemed either not to in ear, 
or not to care. There are unbelieving 
people now w^ho say, "what has been the 
result of your work?" just as in old 
times there were those who said, "Where 
is the promise of His coming? All 
things continue as they were from the 
foundation of the world." H. Peter 3 -.4. 
To the superficial observer there is 
weight in this mocking unbelief; but' to 
one who looks below the surface and 
considers the great undercurrents which 
can be plainly perceived it is evident that 



our labor is not in vain in the Lord. L 
Corinthians 15 -.^S. 

Allow me in this letter to call your 
attention to a number of signs of the 
times which clearly show that progress 
is being made. Some of them have been 
mentioned hitherto, but each of them 
will derive power from the neighborhood 
with its fellow. 

And first, consider the efforts which 
are being made to secure m.embers for 
lodges. A gentleman recently told me 
that two ladies in his town, a small vil- 
lage, had canvassed every woman in 
town, with the exception of three, en- 
deavoring to persuade them to unite with 
some lodge. Almost any of the insur- 
ance lodges will now accept a member 
on payment of fees, without asking him- 
to be initiated. Only a few days ago a 
worthy man who has recently united 
with the Woodmen said to me that he 
had never been in the Woodmen's lodge 
but once, and that he never expected to 
go again ; that he had simply taken out 
some insurance. 

These efi^orts are almost hysterical^ 
and show the straits to which these or- 
ganizations are reduced. They must in- 
crease their membership, or else their 
fees will become prohibitive in Ohio. 
And so these half-crazed men and wom- 
en rush about from house to house, from 
place to place, arguing, entreating, per- 
suading, to get men and women to unite. 
This very fact, properly considered, is 
encouraging to us, and should help us 
to press on. 

Second, consider that next to the lie 
that secret societies are not secret, the 
falsehood that they are founded on the 
Bible is perhaps the most popular and 
widespread. Men who do not know 
that Masonry strikes the name of Jesus 
Christ out of the Bible, but who do know 
that the ritual contains a few extracts 
from.it say that Masonry is "all found- 
ed on the Bible." An Odd Fellow who 
knows nothing about the plan of salva- 
tion, but who has been taught by some 
lecturer, says that Odd Fellowship is "all 
founded on the Bible." Every little secret 
order, founded by some hungry group of 
men who cannot make an honest living- 



May. 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



by honest labor, patches together a few- 
extracts from the Word of God, makes 
tip some obHgations on the model of the 
Masonic, invents or borrows a few signs, 
grips and tokens, and then sends out 
workers, telling them to get a little group 
of men in each town to go in as charter 
members for nothing, that they may use 
them as stool-pigeons, that they may 
draw in others, whom they will cause to 
pay. And then when they have gotten 
their lodge organized, and Christians ob- 
ject to it, because it yokes the good and 
bad unequally, because of. its licentious 
dances and plays, they look solemn, and 
say it is ''all founded on the Bible." 

The last thing of this sort which has 
fallen under my own observation is men- 
tioned in a newspaper from a little town 
in Pennsylvania of which I never heard 
imtil this time. The writer says : 

The new lodge, Kuigbts of Malta, of Perk- 
asie, is assured by tbe committee wbo bas 
tbe affair in cbarge, and due notice will be 
given in tbis paper wbicb evening tbe Grand 
Lodge officers will be here to organize tbe 
lodge. One beautiful feature is tbe high es- 
teem the people all over tbe world bold this 
organization in. It is strictly religious, 
beneficial, caring for tbe sick brothers, arid 
tbe family, protecting and educating tbe or> 
phans. In some parts of the country they 
have their own hospitals. Their degree work 
is beautiful and instructive, ranking second 
to none in tbe world. 

You see, among the excellencies of this 
lodge is the fact that it is strictly re- 
ligious. A little further dowai the writer 
continues : 

Tbe twelve degrees of tbe order are found- 
ed upon the Holy Bible. These degrees are 
of peculiar signification. They appeal to 
the student of the Bible and ancient bistorj-. 
They illustrate the progress of tbe Christian 
world from mental and spiritual darkness 
into tbe glorious light and liberty of free 
and accepted sons of God. 

Tbe ancient manners and customs of Bible 
times are faithfully portrayed in all their 
beauty and simplicity. These degrees beget 
an interest in and a love for tbe sacred 
Scriptures that nothing else can do. They 
elevate and ennoble a man. They appeal to 
everything that is good and pure in his man- 
hood. The obligation binds the members 
more closely together than any other secret 
society. Tbe ceremonies of initiation are 
especially solemn and impressive upon tbe 



mind of the candidate that is never forgot- 
ten. Other secret societies are established 
for a special purpose, and when that purpose 
shall have been accomplished they will pass 
away. But tbis order is an Evangelical 
Christian fraternity. Its creed is tbe creed 
of Christianity, and so long as there is a 
Christ and a Christian church so long will 
the order continue to exist. 

This is a fair specimen of the argu- 
ments which are used to draw unthink- 
ing people into these organizations. "All 
founded on the Bible." "Any person who 
lives up to its obligations vc^ill be a 
Christian," etc., etc. I was riding on a 
railway train within thirty days, and 
speaking to the young man who sat with 
me, I asked, "Are you a Christian?" 
"Yes," he said, 'T have gotten as far 
along as that," and turning down the 
lapel of his coat, he revealed a Masonic 
pin on his vest. I said to him, "Then 
you consider Freemasonry a religious 
organization, do you?" "O, certainly," 
he replied, "nobody can be a Mason who 
is not a Christian." And yet nobody can 
be a Mason who does not swear under 
penalty of having his throat cut across, 
under penalty of having his heart taken 
out, under penalty of having his body 
cut in two, etc., etc. No one can be a 
Freemason who does not consent to be 
unequally yoked with unbelievers ; no 
one can be a Freemason wdio does not 
consent to striking Jesus Christ out from 
the prayers of the order, and even to 
striking His name out of the Word of 
God itself. 

I admit, of course, that many people 
do these things ignorantly; but they do 
them. And then w-e are taught that 
Freemasonry and all other organizations 
of like character are "founded on the 
Bible," simply because the Bible is lugged 
in, and quotations from it are made to 
secure the membership of men who 
would not stand for infidelity and athe- 
ism. 

A third fact which is encouraging at 
the present time is that the pretence of 
charity on the part of these organizations 
is being given up. For example, I find 
in the Masonic Chronicler the following 
words. The writer is contrasting the 
Masonry of the present with the ^la- 



10 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 19l>" 



scnrv of the olden time. The article is 
headed, "In the Olden Time," and there 
is a quotation from the Missouri Free- 
mason Avhich reads as follows : "Then 
(in the olden time) the lodge was not 
expected to pay heavy funeral bills for 
a member, nor was there any necessity 
for doing- so." 

This is ver)- inspiring, is it not? The 
writer is boasting of the old time Ma- 
sonry. He says that then the lodges 
were not expected to pay heavy funeral 
bills. The intimation is that now they 
are expected to do so. But he does not 
say as he truthfully might, that this ex- 
pectation, if it exists, is frequently dis- 
appointed. 

His remark recalled to me the state- 
ment made to me by a minister of this 
State, whose father was a minister, and 
who had a number of brothers who were 
ministers. His father acquired a large 
body of land, and was at the time of his 
death supposed to be wealthy. In his 
youth he had joined the Masonic lodge, 
but for many years had had no fellow- 
ship with it. When he died the Masons 
rushed out to his widow, and begged to 
be permitted to bury him.^ She objected, 
saying that her husband had had noth- 
ing to do with Masonry for years, that 
she did not approve of it, and that she 
did not wash them to perform the serv- 
ice, etc., but they insisted and she yield- 
ed. 

This gentleman told me that the lodge 
hired every livery rig in Quincy, 111., 
for the Masons to attend that funeral. 
The world looked on in open-mouthed 
wonder. What a marvelous thing it was 
to have a string of carriages like that 
at a funeral ! And to think that the Ma- 
sons were doing all this at their own 
expense in honor of their brother ! Yet 
after a little while the lodge presented a 
bill of five hundred dollars against that 
estate for the use of those carriages. The 
estate was found to be almost worthless. 
There were large assets, but there were 
large liabilities. And so that widow and 
her children out of their own pockets 
paid that carriage bill, which they did 
not contract, w^hich was contracted by 
the ]\Iasons for the glory of Masonry. 



A similar experience came to mv 
knowledge only a few days ago. A Free- 
mason from Wyanet, 111., was sent, I 
think, to Dakota by his employer to sell 
threshing machines. While there he sick- 
ened and died. A friend went after him, 
and brought his body home. The Ma- 
sons flocked around him, and took charge 
of the funeral arrangements. The min- 
ister who descended from his high posi- 
tion as a servant of God, and became a 
tooter for the Freemasons on that occa- 
sion, said, "See what the Masons have 
done for this man; w^atched over him, 
looked after him, prepared his coffin, 
brought him home — and all free, all free, 
all free. Who dares to say that a man 
who was a member of an organization 
like that did not go to heaven?" Yet 
that man was not only not a member of 
a church, but he never went to church. 
And that preacher, who was paid a sal- 
ary by a church to preach the gospel of 
Jesus Christ, and to build up His king- 
dom in the world, profaned the house of 
God by lafiguage of that sort. 

The point of it, however, I had for a 
moment forgotten; it was this: Every 
cent of those expenses, contracted bv the 
Freemasons was paid by the widow. 
She told my friend, Mr. John Bradley, 
of that city within two years, that this 
was the fact, and that the bills amount- 
ed to about five hundred dollars. 

And now comes the Mis*30uri Free- 
mason to give us the theory of this prac- 
tice. In olden times Masonic lodges were 
not expected to pay large bills for fun- 
eral expenses of members. Indeed, what 
were Masonic lodges expected to do in 
olden times? What are they expected 
to do now ? They swear men under death 
penalties to conceal the proceedings of 
their lodge meetings from wives and 
children and civil government. They 
take men's money for initiation, for dues, 
for dances, for banquets ; they yoke up 
good men, and Christian men, with others 
who are not only godless, but in many 
instances base and ignoble even when 
judged by human standards. What do 
they purpose to give in return for these 
oaths, this money, this time, this com- 
panionship ? Men and women have been 



May, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURB. 



11 



told, that when Masons grow poor, grow 
sick, or die, there will be some return. 
But we find that there is no return. 
Widows, orphans and estates pay the 
bills. Where there are no estates to pay 
them, there is very little Masonic dis- 
play, oftentimes none at all. And the 
Missouri 'Freemason comes in to tell us 
that this is the way it ought to be; that 
men who expect to get anything out of 
Freemasonry are fools or frauds. 

It is a good thing to have a lie un- 
masked. Let us understand definitely 
that Masons do not profess to make re- 
turns for the expenditures which they 
require. If they can saddle men on the 
public treasury, if they can get them- 
selves elected to offices where the tax- 
payers will have to pay their debts that 
they may do. But as to any fulfilment 
of obligations on their part, that is not 
to be looked for — at least, according to 
the Missouri Freemason. 

I wish to call your attention to an- 
other fact that will conclude this letter. 
As the effort to deceive men by the 
pretence of a Biblical foundation for the 
lodges is redoubled at this time, so^ the 
eft'ort to bring lodges into the control of 
the church and church institutions is con- 
stant. I find in the Chicago Tribune of 
recent date, under the head "Lodge Men 
Meet in Church," the following extract: 

Efforts to bring religion and secret so- 
cieties into a closer relationship and better 
understanding resulted in a special Knights 
of Pythias service at Trinity Episcopal 
church, Twenty-sixth street and Michigan 
avenue, last night. More than 1,000 mem- 
bers of the order were present. Four more 
will be held this year. The Rev. Z. B. Phil- 
lips, in his sermon, said religion promoted 
better fellowship, and, in many instances, 
had the same aims as lodges. 

Here are a thousand lodge men meet- 
ing in a church, with a sermon by a 
Christian minister who tells them that 
churches and lodsfes are working- for the 
same ends, and should be co-operant in 
society. Of course, that preacher must 
know that lodge men do not in general 
belong to the churches. It was recently 
stated in print that sixty-five per cent of 



the Freemasons in this country belonged 
to the Christian churches. No man who 
is informed regarding the facts would 
think of saying such a thing as this. 
From a careful study of the subject, 
running through many years, I am satis- 
fied that ten per cent would be an over- 
estimate. Of course, I do not pretend to 
exact numbers. No one knows them at 
present, for the census has never been 
made. But it is absurd to say that any 
large percentage of Freemasons, Odd 
Fellows, or Knights of Pythias are 
church members. The whole tendency 
of these orders is to keep men away 
from the churches ; and if the members 
of such orders get into the churches thev 
either ''love the one and hate the other, 
or cleave to the one and despise the 
other." Men cannot serve both lodges 
and -churches, and do not. But there is 
e\'er a cry in the human soul after God, 
and the gods of the heathen, that is, all 
gods who are worshiped without Christ, 
have never from the beginning until now 
satisfied that cry. And so the lodges are 
by some hook or crook getting into the 
churches. 

The Saint John's Days, Easter, some- 
thing or other — no matter what, so that 
godless, drunken, unholy men, who never 
go near the churches on other occasions, 
may march in with swords and feathers, 
and make a display of themselves, and 
then leave the church for another year 
to go to the places that they really en- 
joy — all these are brought in to unite 
the lodges with the churches. And 
preachers from time to time help to 
make the ruin of these souls more sure 
by preaching to them falsehoods about 
the mission of the church and the mission 
of the lodge^ the foundation of the lodge, 
and the foundation of the church. 

We are to remember, however, that 
God is not deceived — that He will not be 
mocked ; and that we are living in an age 
when judgment is advancing fast upon 
the unbelieving world. We have every 
reason to feel that God Himself is mov- 
ing. The legislatures of Kansas and 
Minnesota are discussing the legal pro- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1907, 



liibition of high school lodges. The Su- 
preme Court of A\'ashington has decided 
that the Boards of Education already 
have the rig'ht to forbid them. The 
Board of Education in Chicago has been 
sustained by the courts in its efforts to 
wipe out these boy lodges, which have 
been corrupting and destroying those 
whom they have drawn in. Newspapers 
which never had a friendly word to say 
for our work give columns to statements 
of fact regarding the secret society 
movement in the high schools. 

But secret societies in high schools 
are just like secret societies out of high 
schools. They are adapted to the same 
ends, they do the same deadly work. It 
is quite proper that high school lodges 
should be forbidden by law. All lodges 
ought to be forbidden by law. It is a 
singular fact that any body of men 
should be permitted under cover of law 
to meet together and plan for the politi- 
cal advancement of their members, for 
the protection of criminals connected 
with them, for the injury, financial or 
other, of those outside their membership. 
Wendell Phillips was entirely right when 
he said, that secret organizations should 
be forbidden by the law of the land. We 
may say more. They will be. If not 
sooner, then later. For righteousness is 
to triumph, and all iniquity, and iniquit- 
ous things are to be destroyed. Fra- 
ternally yours, 

Charles A. Blanchard. 



iiiitorial. 



DIED AFTER INITIATION. 

Deaths from Masonic and college in- 
itiations are not unknown, but fatal re- 
sults from Odd Fellow initiation are not 
so common. It is alleged that Charles 
D. Sharp, son of a Boston minister v/as 
initiated Saturday night, December ist, 
in an Odd Fellow lodge in Los Angeles, 
California, took to his bed, and the next 
Friday morning died. It is also alleged 
that he said: "They tore my clothes off 
and knelt on my chest. I think one .^f 
my ribs is broken. There is a severe pain 
in my chest all the time." If this' is 
true, they appear to have been fraternal 
after the -manner of Joseph's brethren 
when they put him in the pit. 



THE LODGE GOAT. 

In Armour's packmg house, Chicago, 
there is said to be a goat which has been 
trained to walk ahead of the sheep and 
to deliver them over to the butcher, who 
stands ready for their destruction. ' This 
goat is taken the best of care of. He is a 
valuable asset in the busmess. 

It is not uncommon for ministers to 
receive their degrees from, the lodge 
without expense to themselves. They 
make the best 'kind of lodge goat for 
leading the sheep of their pasture 
(young men) into lodge fellowship. 
These ministers are an important asset 
of the lodge. It has a financial interest 
in them and the lodge members will con- 
tribute to their support. Besides being 
a lodge goat to lead the sheep to their 
souls' destruction, the minister of this 
sort will preach the annual sermon on 
lodge-advertising Sunday. What a con- 
trast to the example of the Lord Jesus 
Christ, who would have died rather than 
have shown a distrust of His Father's 
care, by making an alliance with the 
world or its Prince, for bread ! Such 
lodge- joining ministers v/alk "according 
to the course of this world," and are evi- 
dently "fulfilling the desires of the flesh 
and of the mind," and are by nature the 
"children of wrath." Let us faithfully 
warn and exhort them, and pray for 
them, that "God, who is rich in mercy," 
and who saved us when we were "dead 
in sins," may help us to save them. 



THE CHURCH BROADER IN CHARITY. 

Sunday evening, Feb. 21st, a Metho- 
dist minister preaching on the "Church," 
spoke a few words for men who claim 
that the lodge is better than the church. 
He said in part : 

"I want you to come into t.he cliurc-li be- 
cause of the company you will find there, be- 
cause of the service you can render, and be- 
cause I want you to meet tlie great Captain. 

"I venture as I look into your faces to- 
night, that I see liere the men in the high- 
est standing in the community. This is not 
a bad town, and I would gladly live here, but 
let me tell you I would not consider mv 



May, 190V. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



family safe for 24 hours if every cluircli were 
closed and every minister and Christian were 
to leave the town. 

"You say you have something better than 
the church. What is that? Your lodge? 
Well, I have nothing in particular against 
lodges. They may be very well in their 
place, but let us compare them a little. To 
get help in your lodge the candidate has to 
be looked up, he has to be examined. If a 
member is sick you provide a nurse for him 
and send flowers to his funeral. 

"The church is an institution that is 
broader than that. If some one is sick or 
in trouble we do not ask is he a member of 
our organization, or are his dues paid in 
full? We simply ask is he a brother man In 
need?" 

One thing which may be added is that 
the church is something besides a mere 
health or hfe insurance organization, and 
does more for men than provide nurses 
for the sick or flow^ers for the dead. It 
does not halt at financial returns for 
premiums paid. 



QOMPERISM IN WASHINGTON. 

The Xew York Sun of March 15th 
quoted from what it designated as a 
leading ne\vspaper, which gave the fol- 
lowing outlook of affairs in its city, 
which happens to be the capital of the 
whole country. 

"Unless the master builders concede 
the demands made last night by the 
Structural Building Trades Alliance that 
all non-union men at present employed 
in the building trades in Washington be 
discharged and agree that none but men 
carrying cards be given employment a 
strike will be called immediately, wdiich 
will tie up the erection of nearly every 
large building now in course of construc- 
tion in the city. The Metropolitan Club, 
the new^ municipal building, probably the 
Agricultural building and manv others 
will be affected." 

One of the delegates of the Alliance 
mentioned is quoted as saying, "We are 
willing to fight to obtain peace ; what we 
propose to do is to have our organization 
so eff'ectually trained as to make it im- 
possible for the bosses to even begin 
their w^ork if non-union men are em- 
ployed.'' 

Here is a pretty frank exposure of the 



democracy or its opposite which has in- 
truded into American life, and of respect 
for American law\ Fair play and public 
decency are shamelessly disavowed ; tyr- 
anny of a type that would disgrace the 
bosses if they could and w^ould ape Gom- 
perism and a code fitted for the use of 
smugglers and highw^aymen without al- 
teration, is set forth as if fit to be an- 
nounced within the borders of a civilized 
nation. It is a discouraging thought that 
in every place open to ordinary suffrage, 
and concerning any subject considered 
there, such creatures vote. This country 
has several things to dread, prominent 
among wdiich is gomperization. 



ANOTHER NOTCH ON THE BRAKE. 

Several months ago hearings were 
given by the Springfield, ^lassachusetts, 
school Board in wdiich citizens discussed 
the vexatious question of high school se- 
cret societies, and after thorough consid- 
eration and great publicity, aided by the 
able local papers, the board adopted the 
following resolution near the end of Sep- 
tember. 

Resolved, That it is the judgment of the 
school board that official recognition should 
be withheld from a student organization 
which does not admit jurisdiction on the part 
of the school authorities, and it is there- 
fore voted that no secret fraternity, sorority 
or other secret society shall be permitted to 
use as a part of its title, in connection with 
catalogues, programs or publications of any 
kind, the name of the high or other public 
schools to which its members may happen to 
belong, or in any way to represent itself as 
an organization existing under the sanction 
of the public school department of the city. 

Soon afterw^ard a question arose be- 
cause one of the girl societies which was 
to have a dance had two or three teach- 
ers engaged as patronesses, and these 
teachers wxre informed that such a ser- 
vice would be considered contrary to the 
spirit of the rule. The teachers were 
among the graduate members of the so- 
ciety, but under the understandins- they 
withdrew so far as acting as patronesses 
was concerned. 

The resolution passed by unanimous 
vote, vet one member of the board pro- 
ceeded to claim for it a construction 
which the others did not as^-ree with. 



1-i 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1907. 



Some of the teachers seemed to be un- 
certain about its effect in cases where 
teachers remained graduate members. 
They were not sure whether it ruled 
against all activity in the societies or not. 
One or two teachers asked the superin- 
tendent to make a ruling detining the 
teachers' real position. 

At length the school board passed in 
the spring a clause supplementary to the 
resolution of the fall preceding, which 
seems likely to separate the faculty 
wholly from complicity with the obnox- 
ious system. As for the original resolu- 
tion, the vote was also unanimous for 
the following addition : 

It is also the judgment of the board that 
membership, active or post-graduate, in a 
secret fraternity or sorority, or patronage of 
such society in any other manner on the 
part of any teacher or other official of the 
public schools, constitutes official recognition 
within the meaning of the foregoing resolu- 
tion. 



LAW OF LABOR. 

Organized labor was the subject of a 
sermon yesterday morning on the "Law 
of Labor," by the Rev. Raymond H. 
Wilson in the Walnut Street Presby- 
terian Church, Philadelphia. 

''Members of labor unions," he said, 
''seem to take it for granted that they 
represent labor. I think it must be pretty 
clear that these self-appointed spokesmen 
for the men of toil are merely the aris- 
tocracy of the workers." 

The speaker charged that the funda- 
mental principles of labor unions were 
opposite to the principles of Christ. 

"The principle of the most pay for 
least work is of the world and not of 
Christ," he said, "as is also the principle 
so prominent in labor discussions, name- 
ly, that the troubles of the workingmen 
will be over when his wages are suffi- 
cient." 

Doctor Wilson added that a "law of 
labor" was needed, "not for the three 
millions of organized labor, nor for the 
thirty millions of productive toilers, but 
for all." 



MOODY BIBLE INSTITUTE. 

Mr. Moody used to claim that the sum- 
mer is the best time for aggressive Chris- 
tian effort since it is easy then to get at 
the people in the open air, while often 
impossible to get them into the churches. 
So when he founded a school for Chris- 
tian workers at Chicago in 1886, he 
planned that it should remain open 
throughout the year, and this plan has 
always proved a success. 

The prospectus for next summer's 
schedule, May to August, is now issued. 
Send for a copy. Address 80 Institute 
place, Chicago. Daily classes in Bible 
and Gospel music are to be held, taught 
by men of national reputation like Dr. 
James M. Gray and D. B. Towner, and 
their associates. 

In addition, a succession of special lec- 
tures by Dr. Torrey, President W. G. 
Moorhead of Xenia (Ohio) Theological 
Seminary, Dr. E. M. Wherry of India, 
Mrs. Antoinette Lamoreaux and Dr. A. 
C. Dixon of Chicago, and others are 
offered. * 

The method of the Institute is to com- 
bine practical training with lectures and 
study, and by means of tent, Gospel wag- 
on and open air meetings the students 
get all-round experience. This makes it 
helpful and attractive to pastors and re- 
turned missionaries who wish to freshen 
up their experience. 

Many college and seminary students 
and school teachers have already applied 
for admission. 



Faith is the lens which brings the in- 
?/is;'ble to view. 



FROM BALL TO CHURCH MEMORIAL 

Opening its fifty-ninth annual conven- 
tion with a ball W^ednesday evening, Feb. 
20th, the Theta Delta Chi closed Sunday 
afternoon with a memorial service at the 
Fourth Presbyterian Church, West End 
avenue and Ninety-first street, New 
York. The progress was surely in the 
natural direction, and if it is better to go 
to the house of mourning than to the 
house of feasting, or to the house of 
dancing, which is a modern counterpart 
apparently, the progress was in the right 
direction. One of the most impressive 
external characteristics of secret orders 
open to the view of all is their easy affil- 
iation with vices large and small. 



May. lOQ- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



DECADENCE OF GOOD TEMPLARY. 

The decadence of Good Templary can 
not be charged up against the Prohibi- 
tion part}^ Space in the Phalanx and 
other papers of the party has been freely 
given for the news and advocacy of the 
claims of the order. It is evident that 
reasons for its receding must be sought 
elsewhere. And principal of these, we 
believe, is that people have concluded 
that secret organizations are not neces- 
sary or best for temperance work. The 
Sons of Temperance also had its day. 
Then the multiplying of the insurance 
fraternities, reaching every community, 
has had something to do with crowding 
these temperance organizations to the 
vrall. Why, in some places the church 
lias almost had the life squeezed out of 
it for the same reason. — Patriot Phalmix. 



INDEPENDENT ORDER OF GOOD TEM= 
PLARS, 
Hon. Neal Dow's Testimony. 

'T will tell you very frankly, ladies, 
that when the W. C. T. U. began, I 
thought not much would come of it. 
* "^ "^ I belong to the Good Tern-' 
plars ; very nice people ; we like temper- 
ance, pass temperance resolutions, sing 
temperance songs, for temperance we 
pray, but then, practically, we do not do 
very much ; that is to say, we don't vote 
that w^ay. ''' * * You never see any 
party newspapers say a word against the 
Sons of Temperance or Good Tem- 
plars." — Daily Union Signal, Oct. 22, 
1888, at National W. C. T. U. Conven- 
tion. 

Don't Vote That Way. 

At the thirty-eighth session of the 
Grand Lodge of Illinois, Independent 
Order Good Templars, the following 
resolution was offered : 

Resolved, That in view of the widespread 
interest in the temperance cause and the 
aggressive spirit of all temperance workers, 
we deem it wise and best that all voters give 
their support by franchise to such parties 
as express themselves positively in favor of 
the abolition of the liquor traffic." 

This resolution failed to pass. The 
Good Templars' organization is nonpar- 
tisan and forbids partisan discussions in 
the lodge. It is evident that Hon. Neal 



Dow had good reasons for sayino- that 
Good Templars ''don't vote that way," 
and that many of their professions were 
a mere sham. And yet we hear temper- 
ance orators declaring that the Prohibi- 
tion party owes its organization and plat- 
form to the Good Templar lodge ! Good 
Templarism has been one of Satan's 
pack horses for popularizing secrecv. 
We are glad to note its decadence. 



TOO MUCH CHRISTIANITY. 

The sick benefit society of a Swedish 
lodge of Good Templars being unable to 
finish business at the time of annual elec- 
tion, adjourned to Sunday afternoon, and 
the weekly business meeting of the lodge 
itself followed. Two new members were 
received, and the lodge proceeded to en- 
gage in an animated discussion of faults 
alleged to belong to the International 
Order of Good Templars. 

The pledge was criticized as not leav- 
ing sufficient leeway regarding religion 
for all who wish to join the order. Re- 
ligious reference ought to be stricken 
out of the ritual so as to open the way 
wider for temperance enthusiasts to en- 
ter the ranks. Lodges should encourage 
good temperance orators within their 
own ranks at festivals in preference to 
clergymen. Rituals should incline to high 
ideals rather than to anything having the 
quality of sect: in this respect thev 
should be on a level with Odd Fellow 
rituals. (Odd Fellowship calls Chris- 
tianity a sect of the universal religion 
which includes paganism, and discoun- 
tenances the mention of Jesus' name in 
the prayers of the lodge.) 

On the whole, this secret order pro- 
fessedly devoted to temperance, appears 
to contain members who are troubled by 
the religion of the order, and by the 
presence of preachers of religion. ^ The 
last is a natural corollary, for how liable 
a preacher would be to let slip some 
word that would be sectarian; that is. 
Christian in distinction from deistic or 
pagan. 



Every life exerts an influence, in some 
way, every time it touches others — it 
makes them happier and better, or the 
reverse. 



10 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1907. 



JONATHAN STEVENS PERM AM. 

Jonathan Stevens Perham died at 
Brookfield, Vt., March 12, 1907, of old 
age. in his ninety-fifth year. He was 
dressed and about the house in the morn- 
ing and passed away apparently with- 
out pain at 4:30 p. m. 

He was born at Brownsville, Me., July 
7, 1812. The family moved to New 
Hampshire on account of threatened In- 
dian trouble,, thence to Tunbridge, Vt., 
and to Brookfield about 1822. He came 
to his late home in 1839. H^ was the 
last of ten children born to William Per- 
ham, third, and Prudy (Stevens) Per- 
ham and of the sixth generation from the 
first American ancestor, who was born 
in England in 1632, and settled in 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

He was converted at the age of 17, 
joined the Freewill Baptist church at 
East Roxbury Feb. 28, 1851, united by 
letter with the Second Congregational 
church of Brookfield. He was anti- 
secret from Morgan times; politically, an 
Abolitionist, Liberty, Free Soil, Republi- 
can and Prohibitionist. He was one of 
the "319" who voted for Birney in 1840. 
He did not use tea, coffee, tobacco or 
liquor and was never ill enough to call 
a physician. 

He is survived by one son, John B. 
Perham ; seven grandchildren, and three 
great-grandchildren. 

Mr. Perham was fourteen years old 
when Morgan was murdered. In his 
twenty-fourth year he was elected to the 
Legislature by the Anti-Masonic party. 
He was a loyal friend of the Christian 
Cynosure, but better than that, he has 
left a son with the same principles, who 
will with the same unflinching integrity 
continue to fight the good fight. 



Ballington Booth declares that ''the 
principles of my father and myself dif- 
fer in many ways." When Gen. William 
Booth was in Chicago, on his former trip 
around the world, he told us that mem- 
bership in the Masonic order was forbid- 
den to the Salvation Army. Is this the 
reason why Ballington declares : "There 
is no possibility, as long as I live, of an. 
amalgamation of the Salvation Army and 
the Volunteers of America"? He joined 



the ^lasons immediately upon breaking 
with his father and the Salvation Army. 
The old General is making his last trip 
of inspection, the world round, and Bal- 
lington says: "I will always be glad to 
meet him (his father), if he expresses 
desire for a meeting. I shall not, how- 
ever, communicate with him first." 



CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED. 

The Treasurer reports having received 
the following amounts since the last re- 
port, four months ago : $1 from each of 
the following: Rev. D. S: F., Mrs. L. C. 
A., C. S. A., D. B., J. S., Mrs. D. R. K., 
Rev. J. McF., Miss E. F., Rev. J. A. B., 
S. M., Rev. E. A. S. ; $5 from each of the 
following: P. B. P., J. E. P., D. A. S., 
F. L. F., C. A, F., Rev. E. R. W., W. 
K., Mrs. J. A. R. ; 75 cents from Rev. 
\\\ G. W. ; 60 cents from Mrs. R. S. ; $10 
from each of the following: C. A. B., 
Prof. R. L. P., E. W. ; $12.50 from W. I. 
P. ; $4 from Rev. T. A. McE. ; $75 from 
O. C. L. ; $200 from estate of Eli Rar- 
den; $33.21 from Wheaton College. 
Church; $11.45 from Fifth Avenue 
Christian Reformed Church, Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. ; $6.^^, from East Street Chris- 
tian Reformed Church, Grand Rapids, - 
Mich.; $25.83 from First Christian Re- 
formed Church, Roseland, III; $6.88 
from the Christian Reformed Church, 
West Sayville, N. Y. 



Among the good and faithful friends 
of the Cynosure and of the cause wdiich 
it advocates are Rxv. H. Sawyer and 
wife, of Milan, Michigan — one eighty 
and the other seventy-nine years of age. 
Brother Sawyer in his early manhood 
was a member of the Sons of Temper- 
ance, where in a short time he got all 
the secretism he wanted for the rest of 
his life. Referring to his experience in 
the ministry he says : Oh, the destruc- 
tion that secret societies have wrought! 
He does not think the story, "A Twen- 
tieth-Century Minister," calculated to do 
very much in the way of enlightening the 
rising generation as to the evils of secret- 
ism. 



There is always a place to reap for 
the man who has his sickle readv. 



May, 1007, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Mtm of ®ur Pori 



Mr. A. D. Cline, of Pikeville, Ken- 
tucky, is a new name to the readers of 
the Cynosure. He is a man, however, 
that has the ''courage of his convic- 
tions." He is a Seceder, but better than 
that, he is a spirit-fiUed Christian, and it 
is not to be wondered at that Satan is 
causing some excitement in that com- 
munity. However, the Holy Spirit is tri- 
umphing, and several have joined them- 
selves to Brother Cline in this work. He 
writes that several have renounced their 
lodges, and we may expect the testimony 
in the Cynosure in the near future. He 
says, 'Tray for me! That I may not 
compromise. I would rather be right 
than have the honor and applause of all 
the world." 



G. W. Park, of Virginia, Missouri, 
writes under date of April i8th, that 
Carrie Nation recently spoke in Butler, 
Missouri, and had about five hundred out 
to hear her. She gave her address in 
the Christian church. She told the peo- 
ple that Masonry violated the marriage 
contract; that God made husband and 
wife one, but that Masonry by its obliga- 
tion of exclusion made them two. She 
said that the Masons took an oath not to 
violate the chastity of a Mason's wife or 
daughter, but, said she, what about the 
wives and daughters of other people? 
Mrs. Nation charged them with exclud- 
ing Christ from the lodge, and gave all 
the secret societies a "grubbing." The 
Eagles she called buzzards. Mr. Parks 
says, 'T have heard many people talk on 
secret societies, but never heard any one 
go for them as she did." 



FROM ARKANSAS. 

Mr. A. J. Millard, of Little Rock, Ar- 
kansas, is contemplating attending our 
annual meeting in June. In a recent 
letter he writes : "The package of books 
and tracts have just come to hand. I 
Avas waiting for them. I want to give 
some of them to the young man here 
who is contemplating joining tlie Ma- 
sons. \Miile talking to the young man 



recently a Mason and a Baptist preacher 
came in and picking up one of the tracts 
on Masonic oaths said, They are not the 
oaths of Masonry.' I said, they are, and 
I can prove them to be such, and re- 
ferred him to Mr. Ben M. Bogard, who 
says that they are the oaths of Mason- 
ry, and that there is no use in denying 
it. This Baptist preacher then began a 
tirade of abuse, and said that any one 
that had taken the oaths and then ex- 
posed and revealed them, was a low- 
down, mean, dirty scoundrel. I ?aid, do 
you think that Herod ought to have kept 
his oath, even if he had to take off the 
head of John the Baptist? He answered 
that I would be blackballed if T tried to 
join a Masonic lodge. I told him that I 
was not trying to get in, but trying to 
stay out; that Jesus would not blackball 
mc , and that was all that I cared for. I 
told him I expected to go to the annual 
meeting of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation, and expected to see a number of 
'scoundrels' that had come out of Ma- 
sonry and exposed it. He said he would 
like about forty-five minutes to talk be- 
fore that body, and I assured him he 
could have that privilege." 



STODDARD'S BUSY MONTH. 

Dayton, Ohio, April i8, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure — I have stopped here 
for the night, on my trip west. The past 
month has gone quickly because of the 
pressing work. Ten addresses were giv- 
en in the six days spent with friends in 
Sullivan County, Pennsylvania. It was 
felt that prayers ofifered in behalf of 
tliese meetings were answered. God's 
truth must prevail. There were ques- 
tions and discussions, as would be ex- 
pected. Some received and rejoiced in 
the light, while some (sad to say) pro- 
fessing Christians, chose darkness ; at 
least they were not found seeking light, 
but rather turning from it. Friends con- 
tributed twenty-five dollars to my sup- 
];ort, and several subscriptions for the 
Cynosure. The many acts of kindness 
were cheering. 

Swiftly the train carried me through 
and over mountains and brought me to 
the great metropolis of the East. In 
the never-sleeping New York I sought 



18 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1901 



to keep step with the rushing multitudes 
as I looked up N. C. A. interests. Some 
Icc'iures were booked for November next. 
If the blaster wills, that month is to be 
given to New York and New Jersey 
\\-ork, with the Convention in Paterson, 
N. J. Friends in that section desiring 
lectures at this time will kindly notify 
loe in advance, so dates oan be arranged. 

The lecture in the Christian Reformed 
church, West Sayville, N. Y., was large- 
ly- attended and very encouraging. When 
1 stepped from the train I was greeted 
by my friend, Rev. H. J. Haarsma, 
\viiom I recognized as the young man 
("then a student in Grand Rapids, 
Mich.,) who aided much in the prepara- 
tion for a State Convention years ago. 
He took me to his delightful home, where 
his good wife and little ones cheer him 
on in the battles incident to earnest 
Christian life. In addition to the collec- 
tion, the Cynosure subscriptions obtained 
gave evidence of warm hearts and gener- 
ous hands. It was expected by some 
tii.i.t a i\Iasonic minister of the place 
\\0Ldd be present at the lecture and an- 
swer me. He failed to appear. I called 
on two ministers of the town ; found one 
interested and glad to help, the other 
was angry. In a loud, scolding tone of 
voice, the latter declared he knew the 
Foresters were a good lodge, and kept 
on asserting that he knew this, that and 
the other thing, giving no opportunity 
for reply or suggestion. In leaving I 
felt little could be done to help him until 
he got into a different frame of mind. 
The Christ life cannot be attained with- 
out the Christ-spirit. 

In Washington, D. C, I attended the 
German Baptist Brethren church and re- 
ceived, as always, a cordial welcome. 
Tliese people are not given to display, 
but are getting in solid work for the 
"Master, as their united spirit and in- 
creased membership indicate. I hope ere 
long to be able to give a desired lecture 
m this church. 

At Scottdale, Pa., I found friends at 
the Mennonite publishing house crowd- 
ed for room. An addition, 40x70 feet, 
three stories and basement, is being 
built, and it is hoped they may soon have 
facilities for their increasing business. 



This church and these friends are wide- 
awake, and opposing the Lodge evil. 

At Uniontown, Pa., I fulfilled a long- 
standing desire and gave an anti-lodge 
address in the German Baptist church. 
The attendance was not large, owing to 
storm. Cynosure subscriptions were 
given and a promise of a welcome on my 
return. Our good friend, Jasper Barnt- 
house, elder of this church, was not suf- 
ficiently recovered from sickness to at- 
tend, but his assistant, Rev. B. B. Lud- 
vvick, showed me much kindness. 

A trolley ride to Fairchance discover- 
ed our old friend. Brother J. H. White- 
man, with a church that always wel- 
comes truth along N. C. A. lines. No 
people stand firmer in op/position to' the 
Lodge in all its forms than Free Meth- 
odist friends. 

At New Concord, Ohio, I found our 
Covenanter and United Presbyterian 
friends rejoicing in the help given them 
by President Blanchard during his visit 
last November. ~ That such work was 
needed is evident from the fact that two 
pastois of this town so far forgot their 
high calling as to unite with the Ma- 
sonic lodge. How sad that any minister 
should be misled and join those leading 
away from Christ ! The College at New 
Concord is blessed, and is made a bless- 
ing to many. Among the questions soon 
to be discussed in one of the literary so- 
cieties is ''The Lodge." Much prepara- 
tion is being made for this discussion. 

At Zanesville, Ohio, there is a Free 
Methodist church that will accommodate 
two hundred people. They would wel- 
come an anti-secrecy convention. Can't 
we have a rousing meeting here this 
fall? Who votes for it, and who wdll 
help? 

Columbus, Ohio, gave her usual sup- 
port. At the Capital Lhiiversity I was 
privileged to speak to about 150 young 
men who are preparing to serve the Ohio 
Lutheran Synod churches in the years to 
come. The applause during the intro- 
duction was most cheering, and contin- 
ued during the address. My stay at this 
point was made most pleasant in the 
home of our old friend and helper, D. H. 
Harrington. 

It is impossible to mention here all 



May, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



19 



who contributed to aid the N. C. A. rep- 
resentative at Cedarville, Ohio. On 
vSabbath the work of the Church and 
the Lodge were contrasted, in the churcli 
Avhere, nearly twenty years ago, the 
writer and the one who has since kept 
the altar fires burning at home, were pro- 
nounced man and wife. During the past 
year the present pastor of this church. 
Rev. W. J. Sanderson, has taken to him- 
self a wife. Everywhere there were 
commendations of these good people. 

The College at Cedarville and the 
United Presb3^terian Seminary at Xenia 
both rejoice in increased attendance. I 
cannot now write of increasing interest 
and open doors in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The Monkey Club has recently in- 
creased its membership and built a Tem- 
ple in Hamilton, Ohio. This Club orig- 
inated in what was known as the ''Mon- 
key Saloon." We now see men ( ?) or- 
ganized under the names of Dogs, Elks, 
Buffaloes, Snakes and Monkeys. Which 
of the animals will next be disgraced? 

More anon. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



MICHIGAN AGENT'S REPORT. 

Tipton, Mich., April 22, 1907. 
Mr. Wm. I. Phillips : 

My Dear Brother — ^Since I began 
work the first week in April, I have 
preached three times in and around Elk- 
ton, and have given eight Bible readings 
in Elkton. On Sunday, April 14, I 
preached on ''Separation," at Wakefield, 
Mich. This is one of my sermons on 
Secrecy. All seemed to appreciate it. 
One man became enthusiastic and shout- 
ed and exhorted with great power. More 
than one said they never understood the 
Scriptural teaching on Separation before. 
This congregation was made up of holi- 
ness people, Baptists and Adventists. All 
received the truth gratefully and gladly. 

I secured a subscription for the Cyno- 
sure at Elkton. I canvassed in and 
around Elkton the week before, and sold 
a number of books on Secrecy, besides 
distributing a number of tracts. I was 
well received and hospitably entertained 
everywhere but one or two places. 

I came to Battle Creek last Tuesday 
and tried to sell some books and get an 



opening to lecture on Secrecy, but failed 
to do either. 

On Friday, the 19th, I came to Tipton. 
An old friend of mine is pastor here — 
Rev. H. C. Elliott. He is a very faithful 
and conscientious man of God, who tries 
to be a faithful and true shepherd to his 
flock. Here I lectured, on the 20th, on 
"Unchristian Oaths," in the I\I.' E. 
Church. The lecture was well received. 
One lady said she believed every word of 
it and wished it could be delivered in 
other places where she was acquainted. 
I preached again on Sunday morning, on 
"Separation from the World." There 
was much conviction and deep feeling in 
the audience, and quite a number were in 
tears. So the pastor gave the invitation 
for seekers to come to the altar. One 
youno- man came forward and sought the 
Lord, and soon professed pardon and 
peace. On Sunday evening I preached 
on "The Principles of Secrecy." There 
was good interest and attention. I speak 
here again to-night. 

I have been surprised at the interest 
people take in these subjects when they 
have an opportunit}- to hear. But it is 
difficult to get a hearing. Most minis- 
ters and members are afraid of the sub- 
ject. I have found, too, that it is easy 
to get people under conviction on the sub- 
ject if it is presented from the Bible 
standpoint. At one place there was so 
much feeling and conviction that it 
seemed inappropriate to close the meet- 
ing without an altar service. Quite a 
number prayed. One lodge man got un- 
der conviction and prayed for light and 
leading as if for salvation itself. After- 
ward he promised to leave his lodge for 
good. After dismission some said it 
looked as if they might start a revival 
meeting from that service. Yours fra- 



ternallv. 



G. A. Peoram, 



Oskaloosa, Iowa. April 11, 1907. 
I cannot speak too highly of the 
truths set forth in the Cynosure in the 
years which I have had the pleasure to 
read it. Please find enclosed silbscrip- 
tion for two years. Rev. W. P. Sopher. 



Public generosity does not atone f^r 
private robbery. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUKE. 



May, 1901 



What a happy thing it would be for 
families and for churches if every one 
should move out of Grumble avenue and 
take up his residence in Thanksgiving 
street. 



FROM AGENT BAXTER. 

Corydon, Iowa, April 19, 1907. 
Dear Brother Phillips : 

]\Iarch 19th a service was held at Ra- 
mona, Kan. A lady present remarked 
that she was glad to see so many 3''oung 
people out. The pastor said, "I suppose 
vou will keep at this w^ork if the devil 
don't kill you?" There are persons 
\vhom the evil one does not think worth 
killing. It was far different as to the 
apostle Paul. It would be an honor, in- 
deed, if one had so great spiritual suc- 
cess, as the apostle, that Satan w^ould 
seek to take his life. 

There were only a few at the meeting 
in Blackwell, Okla., March 2Tst. It 
would not be w-ell to stir up the devil in 
this place, unless one was sure he could 
cast him out. It can be done in Jesus' 
name only. 

It was the intention to hold two even- 
ing services at Billings, Okla., but there 
was only one. Thanks are due Brother 
Paden for his kindness. 

We can rejoice over the meeting in a 
country church, near Piedmont, Okla. 
The spirit of God was present. Two 
men rose during the invitation. We 
hope they may truly make Jesus Lord 
in their lives. 

Brother Comstock is a member here. 
His father, as a l3oy, w^orked at the tav- 
ern in New York State, where the con- 
veyance was obtained in which William 
Morgan was taken to Fort Niagara. 

At Enid, Okla., a lady who is now an 
earnest Christian, related the following: 
During her early married life, her hus- 
band desired to become a Mason. From 
money earned by teaching school, she 
p-ave him the means to pay the initiation 
fee. 

The ]\Iaster of the New York City 
Lodge was afterward in their home giv- 
ing an oral drill (though this was con- 
trary to lodge rule) to her husband. As 
the wife was in an adjacent room, she 
listened to this statement of the Master: 



'T am getting tired of this; I have an 
expose which is correct to the letter, 
wdiich you can have and study from.'' 

The husband obtained the book, 
brought it home and laid it on an upper 
shelf. After he had retired and was 
asleep, the wife took down the book, and 
by memorizing from night to night, be- 
came well acquainted wdth its contents. 
More than once as she sat alone, study- 
ing the oaths she became frightened, 
blew out the light and went to bed. The 
husband since leaving the lodge, told 
how alarmed he was as the oath was ad- 
ministered to him ; but when the hood- 
wink was removed, there stood his pas- 
tor and other church members, and im- 
mediately he hid, so to speak, behind 
them. 

March 7th I preached twice in Okla- 
homa City. The next evening I spoke 
to a very small number. I hope there 
was good seed sown. One minister from 
Guthrie was present. Though only ten. 
formed my audience, the amount given' 
was $2.60. 

At Parsons, Kan., it Avas my privilege 
to speak to a few colored people. 

The pastor of the church had been 
giving attention to the Secret Society 
question and is interested. He is not a 
lodge member. As is well known, the 
Lodge has a peculiar fascination to this 
race. 

Lecompton, Kan., is a little hamlet, 
but I trust God may use for His glory 
the truth spoken there. The pastor, in 
conversation once with a Woodman, 
said : 'Tf in a year you only placed four 
sacks of flour in the flour barrel at home, 
how could you expect your wife to take 
out twelve ? How, then, can the Wood- 
men insurance lodge sustain itself, since 
so much is taken out, when a member 
dies in proportion to the dues paid in ? 
"Oh," replied the W^oodman, "we must 
have sixteen thousand initiations yearly, 
and these at $5 apiece bring in $8o,ckx). 
More or less of those initiated drop out, 
and if they do not want to stay we can't 
help it. And in this way we continue to 
do business." 

April 17th God blessed a meeting in 
Lenexa, Kan. In this little place the 
lodges outnumber the churches, and last 



May, 1901 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



21 



week there Avas work to secure a new 
lodge. 

Xotwithstancling that lodges and sun- 
flowers will still thrive in Kansas, we 
know our work will help, if ever so little, 
in advancing the glorious cause of Jesus. 

T. S. Baxter. 



MRS. WOODS' REPORT. 

He Needed the Spoken Word and the 

Printed Tract. 

Pine Bluit,. Ark., April 17, 1907. 
Rev. Wm. I. PhilHps: 

Dear Sir — I told you in my last letter 
how the ''Coftee Creek Alan," a preach- 
er, tried to get me to the place to kill 
me, but failed. 

A\'ell, a few days afterward, I visited 
the P. L. and AI. Association. Dr. E. C. 
Alorris is moderator of this district. 
When I got there Dr. Alorris was talk- 
ing about the Secret Societies. He told 
the preachers that they had no right to 
preach annual sermons for secret orders, 
and that they might as well preach an- 
nual sermons for farmers and merchants. 
He said that there is no more authority 
given in the Bible for one than for the 
other. He said, ''You ought to be loyal 
to the Church, and let these orders alone. 
You all know that I have your signs and 
grips and know what I am talking 
about." After Dr. Morris sat dovv'n. Dr. 
^Merchant, president of the B. Y. P. U., 
said some very strong things against the 
lodges. 

So when the meeting adjourned for 
dinner, one of the preachers came to me 
and said: "Sister Woods, Pm sorry that 
I ever joined an order. Those preachers 
yonder behind the tent are talking so 
badly about them, I wouldn't let them 
know that I ever belonged to one. I am 
ashamed to say that I was foolish enough 
to allow myself to be fooled into the Ma- 
sonic order. I never have felt right 
since I joined that thing." He said, 'T 
stood there just now and listened to those 
preachers, until I was sick of it. I slip- 
ped into the thing last fall, and now I 
am just going to slip right out of it. 
Any man that is a Christian can tell, as 
soon as he is made a member of an or- 
der, that there is something wrong about 
them : but I could not see what it was 



until you gave me those tracts ; then my 
eyes were opened, and now since Dr. 
Alorris and Dr. ^Merchant have said so 
much against the orders to-day, I am 
more determined to quite than ever." 

I tell you, Brother Phillips, God's peo- 
ple are coming out of these idol v.'or- 
ships. Alen and women are coming out^ 
and they are taking a stand for Christ. 
Yours for Christ's service, 

Airs. Lizzie A\ oods. 



REV. DAVIDSON'S REPORT. ♦ 

Mdalia, La., April 17, 1907. 
Dear Brother Phillips : 

Perhaps the readers of the dear old 
Cynosure will be interested in my work 
across the "Alason and Dixon's line." 

I came here by the special invitation 
of the Young Chapel Baptist Church, 
but the rulers of the Secret Empire lost 
no time from the announcement to the 
day of service in endeavoring to keep the 
people away. I had a few out to whom 
I preached and distributed tracts, and 
from whom I received 50 cents in con- 
tributions. I found that the seed sown 
■ last January had brought forth good fruit 
to the glory of God. I was gratified to 
learn that the Negroes owned 40 per cent 
of this town, and have very comfortable 
residences with orchards and gardens. 
The two races here get along very peace- 
ably together. The educational facilities 
are by no means what they should be for 
either race. Very little real interest is 
manifested in church work, but secretism 
is strong, and its kingdom well fortified. 
I was entertained by Rev. John C. Cal- 
houn. 

Natchez, Miss. 
This is one of the oldest, as well as 
most beautiful of Southern cities. It 
was known for years as an old Southern 
aristocratic residence city, but what a 
change ! Bar rooms and gambling dives 
are rampant and defiant; even women, 
especially negro women, are permitted 
to go boldly into the saloons and carouse 
in wine rooms which are specially ar- 
ranged for the degradation of females. 
All of these licentious places are owned 
and operated by educated white men. 
Natchez, once the Eden of Alississippi, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Mdy, 1901 



Crupp, Miss. 

is now a veritable Sodom. // is also the 
supreme scat of goucrniueiit for more 
tJiaii fifty different kinds of secret lodges. 
Here is where the Supreme Masters, 
Grand Masters, Queen Mothers and Sov- 
ereign Grands have their offices. 

I was cordially invited to this place by 
that big-hearted and generous man of 
God, Rev. J. H. C. Henry, to preach for 
him. in his Union Church congregation. 
Brother Henry is an able young man, 
but he has felt the blow of Jubulum's 
maul. I w^as entertained bv Mr. and 
:\rrs. \'. Bush. 

White CastJe, La. 

I was invited to this city by Professor 
A. Taylor to address his school. I de- 
livered tracts and talked of the lodge 
evil. Professor Taylor is a strong lodge 
man, but he indorsed my address, and 
advised the school to hted it. 

I preached at St. Paul's Baptist 
Church, Rev. A. L. Ash, pastor. I found 
Brother Ash a loyal shepherd, opposed 
to lodgism, and the many modern evils 
of the day. White Castle is strongly in- 
fested with secret orders, which, as usu- 
al, are giving the churches a great deal 
of trouble, as well as robbing their own 
dupes. 

Bayou Goula, La. 

I was cordially received in this city 
by Rev. Frank Golden, the devoted pas- 
tor of St. Paul's Baptist Church, who 
had previously announced my appoint- 
ment. I preached for his good people at 
II a. m. and received $2.85. At 8 p. m. 
I preached to an overflow house of intel- 
ligent and patient hearers, and distributed 
''Lodge Lamps," and tracts, and re- 
ceived $10.15. Elder Golden has been 
pastor here 18 years, and stands high in 
the estimation of the community. He is 
a true disciple of Christ, as well as an 
ardent friend to our reform. He has 
never bowed his knee at Baal's secret al- 
tars, but has ever stood as a wall against 
them. He indorsed all that I said. 
Twenty-four came forward for prayer, 
and four were received into the fellow- 
ship of the church. Rev. Golden and his 
people extended to me a most cordial in- 
vitation to return. The Sunday school 
here gave me one dollar. 



I accepted a cordial invitation from 
Mrs. E. Boyd, prmcipai of St. Paul's 
School, to address her students, which I 
did. 

Seymourville, La. 

Here I received the usual welcome 
from Pastor E. Peterson, and preached 
to a large congregation at Union 
Church; but as pay dav was far away, 
the collection was small. The reception 
which I received, ho\^ever, was royal. 
Pastor Peterson is an ardent anti-secret- 
ist, who believes that the only divinely 
ordained institutions are the Home, the 
Church and the State. It was a pleasure 
to meet many old friends here. 

Plaquemine, La. 

A hearty welcome was given me by 
Pastors V. B. Hubbs, L S. Jones and 
D. W. Woods. I preached for Pastor 
Hubbs at Plymouth Rock Church and 
distributed tracts. This place is a lodge 
stronghold, but God has a few true wit- 
nesses here. I secured a number of Cy- 
nosure subscriptions. 

Baton Rouge, La. 

The name Baton Rouge was derived 
from a stick made red in the blood of a 
Frenchman scalped by a band of . Li- 
dians. There is quite a contrast between 
this city now and the city of Baton 
Rouge of 1889, when our anti-secrecy 
convention was held here in Shiloli Bap- 
tist Church by Rev. H. H. Hinman and 
myself. The city now has beautiful as- 
phalt streets, electric lights, trolley cars, 
gigantic buildings and everything in 
modern style. 

I was cordially received by Dr. W. AL 
Taylor and entertained at the home of 
Deacon and Mrs. H. D. Headley. I 
preached at Mt. Zion Baptist Church to 
a large congregation. Dr. Taylor the 
pastor, is a young man, of sterling quali- 
ties. He has 2,000 members under his 
administration, and a fine, commodious 
church has been erected. 1 also preached 
for Rev. R. Brooks, pastor of Macedonia 
Baptist Church. Four young ladies made 
a profession of faith in Christ and join- 
ed the church at the conclusion of my 
sermon. 

Professor J. S. Clark, principal of the 
Baton Rouge Baptist Academy, suspend- 



May, 1901 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



ed all studies and called all students and 
teachers into the spacious chapel of the 
school and gave me twenty minutes to 
address them and tell them of our work. 

Gloster, Miss. 

Rev. R. W. Demars, D. D., received 
me cordially, and invited me to preach. 
Professor F. J. Norwood, principal of 
the city schools, attempted to defend 
lodgism, but after some argument, admit- 
ted that the lodge is hurtful to God's 
Church. 

Jackson, Miss. 

March 24th, at 9:20 a. m., I lectured 
to the Mount Helm Baptist Sunday 
school; at 10:15 to Parish Street Baptist 
Sunday school, and at 1 1 :20 [ preached 
and lectured on the evils of secret orders 
among college students in the chapel of 
Jackson College. This is one of the best 
schools for negroes m the south, and is 
operated by the American Baptist Home 
Missionary Society of Nev/ York. 

This College owns fifty acres of land 
on the outskirts of the city. Has two 
large, three-story brick buildings. Mod- 
ern, and well fitted up. There are other 
smaller buildings. This school raises its 
own cattle, hogs and fowls, potatoes, 
peas, etc. Each student is required to 
work one hour each day. They have 360 
students. The president, L. G. Barrett, 

D. D., heartily indorsed all that I said, 
and he told the students of his Masonic 
experiences when a young man, and told 
them why he left the lodge. This college 
has no Greek letter secret societies, but 
they do have a temperance society, a lit- 
erary society, and a missionary society. 

At I p. m. I lectured at Lynch Street 
Baptist Church. At 3:15 I preached at 
Mount Helm Baptist Church. At 8 p. 
m. I preached at Parish Street Baptist 
Church, to a large and intelligent audi- 
ence. I had a glorious mxeting, and Rev. 

E. B. Topp, D. D., the pastor, indorsed 
the address. Secret societies here are like 
they are in most all other cities, very 
strong and garroting the Church. While 
our services here were in progress, th : 
Knights of Pythias paraded by. being 
about 200 in number, never ceasing beat- 
ing the'r drum, although I had several 
forward for prayer at the time. 



Yazoo City, Miss. 

Rev. C. E. Robinson, pastor of ^It. 
Vernon Baptist Church, assured us six 
weeks in advance that he \\ ould work up 
a general union meeting of all the city 
churches and pastors. He proved him- 
self very worthy, indeed, by making an 
appointment in his own church, but did 
not invite any other church or pastor. 
He absented h.'mself from the meeting in 
his own church and, although I speni 
three days and nights in the city, I did 
not get sight of him. We had, however, 
a very good m.eeting at his church. 

I called on Rev. Dr. McNair, late pas- 
tor of the M. E. Church here. Since his 
recent manly and forceful sermon on the 
evils of secret societies, the Bishop has 
promoted him to the posit.'on of Presid- 
ing Elder of this District. He is a fluent 
talker, a*quick thinker and an intelligent 
man of God. tie led the opposition a 
few weeks ago to the Odd Fellows la:y- 
nig the corner stone of t/ieir new hall on 
the Sabbath and indulging in a street pa- 
rade and revelry on the Sabbath day. 

Rev. Dr. McNair has been a Mason, 
.Knight of Caanan and an Eastern Star, 
but he is now free from the unequal yoke 
of bondage and walking in the sure light 
of God's Word. 

I was cordially received by Pastor A. 
C. Carter, and preached in King Solo- 
mon's Baptist Church to an attentive and 
quiet audience. The pastor, though a 
secretist, is convinced that the lodge is 
injuring the church, and he cordially in- 
vited me to return in ^la}- when he will 
help our work. 

I preached at Calvary Church, Rev. A. 
J. Johnson, pastor, and was followed by 
Mrs. E. E. B. Covington, of Greenville, 
in an able address, in which she heartily 
commended my sermon. 

Belzona, Miss. 

I was kindly received here by Deacon 
H. C. Cohn, of Belzona Chapel Baptist 
Church. I called on my dear old father,, 
who is now eighty years of age and still 
active. Professor Cordill received me 
cordially, and permitted me to deliver a 
twenty minute talk to his 167 students. 
At night I preached at Belzona Chapel 
to a large congregation. Rev. Dr. A\'m. 
Hightower, of Clarksdale, General State 



24 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1907, 



j\Iissionary, was with me and corrobor- 
ated all I said. Lodgis/r; has a strong 
hold here. 

Silver City, Miss. 

I preached at the colored Baptist 
Church, Rev. Greyer, pascor. A lodge of 
"Sons and Daughters of Jacob of xVmer- 
ica" was organized the night before, in 
fJiis church, and as the people had been 
up until 2 a. m., my congregation was 
small. I showed the evils of secretism 
in the home, church and state, and made 
a good impression, and several expressed 
themselves as being convinced that the 
religion of secret orders is devil wor- 
ship. 

Greenville, Miss. 

I was glad to reach home for a little 
rest. 

I lectured Easter Sunday night at Star 
of Bethlehem Church, Rev. C. S. Du- 
pree, pastor, who heartily indorsed what 
I said, and advised loyalty to Christ. 

Arola, Miss. 

Rev. A. B. Bolden invited me to preach 
at Union Baptist Church, but owing to a 
misunderstanding the appointment had 
been made for two weeks later. I con- 
versed with several persons on the evil 
of secret societies and saved one young 
man from being initiated that night. 
Unexpected Help. 

I was cordially received at Anding, 
Alississippi, by Rev. A. C. Carter, G. P. 
Phillips, Rev. Dr. \\m. Hightower and 
other brethren of the Yazoo County Bap- 
tist Association. 

Through the kindness of Rev. Dr. N. 
W. Dixon and Rev. Dr. J. A. Mitchell 1 
v>-as introduced to the association and 
spoke for twenty minutes before the 
largest Countv Association in the State. 

Mrs. E. W^ Wren, Mrs. L. A. Molett 
and another lady read able papers. Mrs. 
Molett's paper, to our pleasant surprise, 
dealt extensively with the evils of secret 
societies and lodge preachers. Mrs. E. 
E. B. Covington, Professor Lav/rence 
and Dr. Hightower delivered able ad- 
dresses. The latter dealt the Secret Em- 
pire a hard blow and with telling .effect. 
I distributed tracts quite freely. 

I attended Sunday school here at 
10:30, addressing it and distributing 



tracts. At 12:30 I preached to an ordi- 
nary congregation. At 8 p. m. I preach- 
ed to a much larger number and distri- 
buted tracts. 

Monday night, April 8th, I preached, 
as per appointment, in St. Peter's 
Church, Yazoo City, and dealt the Secret 
Empire another hard blow. I ran down 
to Jackson on Tuesday, and preached in 
the Lynch Street Baptist Church to a 
large and appreciative audience. I then 
went to Bovina, Mississippi, and distrib- 
uted tracts and made calls. The lodge 
has very few patrons in this place. 

Vicksburg, Miss. 

I was cordially received by Brother 
and Sister 'M. Jackson. By invitation I 
delivered a timely address on the secret 
lodge belore the King Solomon Baptist 
Sunday school ; at 11 :30 I preached in 
the Jackson Street Baptist Church; at 3 
p. m. I delivered an address on our work 
m the Pleasant Green- Baptist Church. 
The pastor. Rev. O. Williams, had just 
preached a Strang pro-secret society ser- 
mon, in w^hich he complimented t'he 
lodge. At night I preached a strong anti-? 
secret society sermon and distributed 
tracts to the very attentive audience 
which had gathered at the King Solomon 
pjaptist Church. This city is also infest- 
ed with lodges of all descriptions, and 
the usual result to the church has fol- 
lowed. 

It is impossible to sum up the amount 
of evil tliese lodges are doing among the 
Negroes of the South, but how little they 
realize it. It is not an unusual thing to 
have one of them tell you: 

"Well, I am going to stick to my 
lodge, cause de lodge gwine look after 
me when sick and bury me when I die." 

Others will tell you- "De lodge is bet- 
ter an de church, cause dey pertect each 
other in trouble." 

There are hundreds of young negroes 
who join secret orders, believing that 
thev can commit any kind of crime and 
escape punishment because of their lodge 
relation. Let the Reform friends pray 
for our deliverance. 

Edwards, Miss. 

Although Rev. H. W. Scott has been 
called awav to Belzoni, he left an ap- 



Mav. 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



pointment for me at friendship Baptist 
Church, of which he is pastor. 

Dr. Scott is an able minister and a 
stern opposer of secret societies. The 
lodge has a very great stronghold here 
and has also greatly affected this church. 
The secretists have their lodge hall right 
next door to Dr. Scott's church, and 
^vhiie I was conducting the. services in 
the church the lodge was having initia- 
tion, the noise of which was plainly and 
clearly heard in the church. I made a 
dynamite charge on the fort of secretisra 
with gospel gun-cotton. Several of their 
select soldiers, as I warmed up with Bi- 
ble denunciation of the lodge, hastened 
to the lodge hall, and in a little while 
the lodge adjourned, and the whole mem- 
bership filed into the church. Three of 
those became so excited that they actual- 
ly attempted a disturbance in the church, 
but I just kept right on. denouncing 
their hidden works of darkness until all 
was quiet. AVe distributed a great many 
tracts and left the craftsmen guessing 
and wondering. 

Any reformer desiring to write me a 
word of encouragement or have me come 
to their community and lecture or preach, 
may write me at 407 Xelson street, 
Greenville, ]\Iiss. Pray for me I 

F. Tames Davidson. 



torn ®ur lltttL 



:\Ir. H. F. Stubbs. of Bradshaw, Xeb., 
writes : 'T very highly appreciate the 
literature you sent me and have made 
ijood use of it, and I believe it has done 



some good." 



Westbrook, ]\Iinn.. Dec. 28, 1906. 
Please to receive this Si and send me 
the Cynosure another year. ]^Iy opinion 
about the Cynosure, in fighting the pow- 
erful bulwark of the Prince of Darkness 
— the Lodge — is : It is a voice in the des- 
ert ; it is David fighting Goliath, and 
therefore it triumphs, though we see its 
triumph not niiich in this world. 

(Rev.) T. Dachsteiner. 



Spadra, Cal. 
Dear Friends — I am eighty-five years 
old, and began to obey God seventy-two 
years ago. God wants me to say this : 
that I know of no living mortal who has 
had as much affliction in his lifetime as 
I have had and still have. I must say 
I feel I am one of the happiest ones of 
earth. 3ilany who have known me all 
this time would perhaps like to see my 
face once more. To all such who will 
send me their names and post office ad- 
dresses. I will try to forward my like- 
ness. (Eld.) Rufus Smith. 



Cadiz, Ohio. Jan. 15, 1907. 

Enclosed find money-order for S3, for 
which please credit two years on my sub- 
scription to the Cynosure, mail to my ad- 
dress a sample set of Christian Workers' 
Tracts, aixi do what you please with the 
remaining y^ cents. 

Dr. AMlliam Wishart lived and died 
grandly! I have enjoyed reading, in the 
January Cynosure, the timely and com- 
plete review of Rev. F. G. X'ewton's so- 
called '"sermon" on Freemasonry. Sin- 
cerelv vours, 

(Rev.) W. G. \\'addle. 



San Diego, Cal, Dec. 8, 1906. 
Enclosed please find Si to pay for ex- 
tending my subscription to Christian Cy- 
nosure. Lodgery is growing rapidlv. but 
Jesus Christ cannot lie: He says. "Every 
tree which my heavenly Father hath not 
planted shall be rooted up."' 

Elder S. IM. Good. 



Keep your brightest smile 
home and those vou love. 



for the 



Lisbon. Iowa, Jan. 8, 1907. 
Enclosed please find draft for S2 to 
pay for my Christian Cynosure to Febru- 
ary, 1909. It has been my dear, good 
paper during the past thirty-five or forty 
years. ]\Iay God's blessing rest upon it 
forever. Respectfully yours, 

J. Bittinger. 

Roxbury, ^lass., Dec. 11, 1906. 
Please find $1 to renew my Cynosure 
for 1907. God speed the Cynosure is my 
desire. It's on a mission of great good 
to humanity. The Lord give you grace 
and courage in this great work, as the 
davs come and go. Yours for the Lord 
Jesus. ^ :Mrs. A. W. Bock. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1907. 



Grand Rapids,, ]\Iich., Oct. 25, 1906. 
Dear Editor: 

Best success attend your blessed work 
cf exposing iniquity. I am glad that God 
has put on some to bring to light the 
hidden things of dishonesty and let the 
oppressed go free. Yours in Him, 

(^Irs.) Louisa R. Coryell. 



Be 



MEANING OF CYNOSURE. 
A Worker that Needeth Not To 
Ashamed. 

Geneva, Ohio, Jan. 10, 1907. 
Dear Brother Phillips — There may be 
some who do not know what a world of 
meaning is in the word Cynosure. In 
addition to its primary significance, it 
has, according to Roget's Thesaurus, 140 
synonyms, and its verbs, over 50. - It is 
doubtful that there is another word 
brought from a foreign language into our 
own covering so wide a field. Talk about 
the symbolism of Masonry. It is the 
dregs of poverty in comparison with that 
of Cynosure. To the Greek, it signified 
the constellation Ursa Minor, which con- 
tains the pole star, the guide of mariners 
on the sea, and travelers crossing des- 
erts. Such was at one time the Christian 
Cynosure to me, but not now. I no 
longer need it for my conviction of duty 
in opposing secretism, nor for conversion 
to its teaching on that subject, nor sancti- 
fication to its kind of work. And yet 
after all, perhaps I need its visits to stim- 
ulate me, and keep me from stacking 
arms in my old age. 

I was once fool enough to unite with 
an oath-bound secret society, but met in 
lodge but three times. Since then my 
convictions of the evils concomitant with 
secretism have grown stronger each year. 
But it was by the reading of the Cyno- 
sure handed me by a lady that aroused 
me to action against every department of 
the secret empire which continues to this 
my eighty-fourth year. Since ten years 
ago I have scattered far and wide in this 
and foreign lands over 150,000 pages of 
anti-secret literature. These lamps flam- 
ing with rare truth have been put into 
the hands of all the members of the, Uni- 
ted States Senate, all the judges and offi- 
cers of the United States Supreme Court, 



700 preachers, mayors of 37 cities, 50 
editors, ofiicial boards of colleges and 
universities, hundreds of young men pre- 
paring for the pulpit and thousands in 
the ordinary walks of life. But my work 
on this line will soon close out. Now 
who will step into my place in the N. 
C. A. ranks when I am mustered out? 
for that event must soon take place. 

"I'm growing fonder of my staff, and 
dimmer are my eyes, 

Much less often do I laugh, and oftener 
my sighs. 

I'm growing careless of my dress, ambi- 
tious less for gold, 

In some things wiser am (I guess) but 
know that I am old." 

Many thanks for the kind words in 
your last letter to me, and also for N. C. 
A. literature sent me for distribution. 
Dominus vohiscum. So prays your 
brother, • E. Brakeman. 



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May, 1901 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



LETTER TO A MINISTER. 

]My Dear Doctor — Your pulpit sub- 
jects for to-morrow, *'The World's Prob- 
lem," and ''Bringing Men to God," sug- 
gest the following thoughts : The way 
out of sin is the way into the kingdom. 
''Show Israel his sin," as a faithful min- 
ister, and he will want you to show him 
his way out of it. 

"The World's Problem" to-day in 
bringing men to God is the alarming in- 
crease of secret societies. Any institu- 
tion that tends to deaden the conscience, 
by substituting a religion and fraternal 
associations for the Christian religion 
and fellowship of the church, is to an 
observant and thoughtful minister as 
great a "problem" as the world presents. 
World-wide secretism is depopulating 
the church and dispiriting her ministry. 
]\Iasonic assiduity and church apathy are 
as one in Satan's hand against "bringing 
men to God." 

Unfortunately the ministers are given 
free initiation into the secrets and mys- 
teries of Masonry in lieu of their influ- 
ence and pulpit silence, making a league 
with hell. Each Sabbath I hear every 
evil in the catalogue denounced, except- 
ing the one evil of secretism, of which 
the preachers are not ignorant, and why 
such studied silence? If such preaching 
is not encouraging to the candidate for 
the lodge, I have no judgment. Who can 
prophesv the moral outcome of a tongue- 
lied ministry ? 

'T have set thee a watchman." You 
see the enemy approaching, but there is 
no alarm. 

Imagine the spectacle of a Alasonic de- 
coy duck picketed on the walls of Zion? 
Pitiable thought that ministerial faith- 
lessness is the order of the day ! 

All we ask of the pulpit is the fullfil- 
ment of her ordination vows : the bareing 
of her arm in defense of the church and 
aggressive war on her enemies ; Masonry 
and all her legitimate offspring. We 
have too much smooth preaching, 
adopted forsooth by the church as a 
war measure. The spiritual health of 
modern Israel would recuperate and her 
enemies would disperse under a reversi- 
ble pulpit. 

Gerizim preaching is good, but alone 



it is dangerous ; mixed with the denun- 
ciations of Ebal, and delivered in the 
spirit of Edwards, is what the church 
needs. Charged with sin in general we 
feel easy, because we have the whole 
world for company ; charged with sin in 
particular, we feel uneasy and lonesome. 
The parable of the poor man and his 
lamb made David the avenger. "Thou 
art the man" brought him to his knees 
in confession. "It is one of the twelve" 
and still Judas had company and some 
comfort, but "Thou hast said" wrought 
a change and made his life unbearable. 

Dear minister, let us have the specifica- 
tions as yon knozu them. Bring individ- 
ual evil home to the individual ; preach 
death-dealing secretism in its naked and 
uncomely form "and if he take warning 
thou hast delivered his soul and thou hast 
delivered thy own soul."' 

Joseph McKee. 

AUegheney, Pa. 

A SECEDER'S TESTIMONY. 

Amanda Smith's Conclusive Experience 

with Secretism. 

(Upon reading in the last Cynosure, there- 
port of the agent of the National Christian 
A'ssociation in the South, F. .J. Davidson, his 
labor being apparently very much among the 
negro churches, my mind recurred to a testi- 
mony concerning secret societies in a book 
which I have in my library, "The Story of 
the Lord's Dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith, 
the Colored Evangelist." After an event- 
ful life, this faithful woman has for some 
years past conducted an orphanage for col- 
ored children in Chicago. Her brief and 
drastic experience with secretism should be 
on record in the Cynosure and herewith fol- 
lows. — Josiah W. Leeds.) 

"In 1865 (Amanda Smith being then 
twenty-eight years of age) my husband," 
she says^ "took a position at Leland's 
Hotel, and we moved from Philadelphia 
to Xew York. 

"We were strangers, I especially. ^Ey 
husband, James Smith, was a ^lason and 
an Odd Fellow, so in that way knew 
many more persons than I. The Xew 
^'ork people, both white and colored, 
seemed so different from the Philadel- 
phia people. I could not seem to get into 
their ways. In Philadelphia my church 
relations were so congenial and spiritual, 
but here I was verv lonesome. * "" '•^' 



2S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1907. 



"My husband got a room in York 
street, and then I onl}' went out to day's 
work. I told m\' husband I did not hke 
New York. Then he advised me to 
join some societies, then I would get bet- 
ter acquainted. All the leading high- 
toned church people were in society; so 
it was then, and is to-day. Well, I was 
high-toned in spirit — always had been ; 
I think I took after the white folks I 
lived with ; they were aristocratic. So I 
thought that is a good idea and I will 
get to know all the nice people ; so I join- 
ed three different societies. 

"I was greatly disappointed in tiie 
spirit that I saw manifested among the 
members, but I said I will have to get 
used to things, then it will be better ; so I 
went on for a year. Then there was a new 
society started called 'The Heroines of 
Jericho.' None but Master Masons' 
wives and daughters could join it, and 
this society was very high-toned, and as 
my husband was a Master Mason, he 
was anxious for me to join. He came 
home one night and told me all about it ; 
nothing w^ould do but I must join this, if 
I let some of the others go. Well, after 
some weeks I did, and we had liashv 
times — all the tinsel regalia and turn out, 
and money spending, and show — -it took 
all I could gather to keep up with it ; 
and I had no chance to draw out any- 
thing, for I had good health and was 
never sick ; but still I must go on paying 
my dues regularly, as I had begun, and 
so I did till '68; then after God had 
sanctified my soul He opened my eyes to 
see the folly of all this and taught me 
how to trust in Him, and I came out of 
every one of them. 

"The more I prayed about it the 
clearer God made it to me that all these 
secret societies are the mothers of selfish- 
ness, pride and worldliness. I shall 
praise God forever that when I asked 
Him for light on these things He gave 
it to me, and as I walked in it He led 
me out into a place of broad rivers. Some 
of the sisters and brethren visited me 
and tried to persuade me. They said, 
'You were just come to where you would 
be in office, and you have paid so much 
money in, and you should not leave it 
now ! W^hen I did not yield they turned 



on me and treated me cooll}', and said 
many unkind things about me. But, 
thank God, I was out to go in no more. 
I treated everybody very kindly, and did 
pray for them all, for I knew God would 
give them light if they only would re- 
ceive it." 



Irom ®ttr €Kl)att0e0» 



The chief reason why the Christ-re- 
jecting- lodges are able to flourish with 
the power so apparent everywhere is 
that the meaning of the life and death 
of Christ is largely lost in the thought of 
the church. Who is Christ that we should 
worship in His name? These are fre- 
quent questions asked by men who were 
pupils in the Sabbath School at some 
time in their lives. We do not say that 
every pupil in the school must be won to 
Christ, but it does seem that the children 
should be so instructed that they would 
never have occasion to asi<: why they must 
worship in the name of the only Savior 
of the world. The real issue is between 
the Lord Jesus and the devil. We choose 
the Lord in everything. 
— Weslej'aii ^Nletliodist. 



THAT LODGE. 

I once belonged to it. Went in for 
the purpose of insurance. The Lord had 
blessed me with some little property, but 
I did not consider it sufficient. Thought 
I would add a couple of thousand more. 
There was a great deal of fun when I 
joined, especially for those who were 
"looking on, but I got through. (Thank 
God I got out.) The more I attended 
the lodge, the more I felt convinced that 
I was in the wrong place. The things 
that I saw might amuse boys, but for 
men, especially those who belong to the 
family of God, it seemed ridiculous. I 
have wondered as I sat in the lodge 
room, what Jesus would think of such 
performances, and have been thoroughly 
satisfied that they would be displeasing 
to Him. Our lodge sometimes gave a 
supper, and would end up with a ball. 
Now, think of a child of God yoked up 
with unbelievers, who engage in such 
worldliness for the sum of a few thous- 



May. 1907. 



CUIUS ri AN CYNOSURE. 



and dollars, when his Father owns tlie 
earth and all the gold and silver there- 
in. I do not want to go to any place that, 
if Jesus was a guest at my house, I could 
not take Him along, neither do I want to 
belong to any organization that I am not 
fully satisfied will meet His approval. 
It became plain to me that the lodge, 
though beneficial to men in a worldly 
sense, was detrimental to the kingdom of 
God, and the only thing for me to do 
wa? to get out. 

I wrote to the secretary of our lodge, 
.and returned my policy, telling him that 
I could no longer remain a member, and 
live according to the teachings of the 
Scripture. Thank God I am free. — J. 
S. J. in The Gospel Witness. 



ORIGIN OF FREEMASONRY. 

A\'. H. Foley — The F'ree Masonic se- 
cret fraternal organization, is credited 
hy enthusiastic writers with great an- 
tiquity. The order, however, is now 
-Stated in an encyclopedia article to have 
been instituted about the early part of 
the eighteenth century — the pretension 
put forth to a date coeval with the build- 
ing of the temple at Jerusalem, with 
King Solomon as the first grand master, 
iDcing considered by those who have thor- 
oughly investigated the subject as not 
^vorthy of credit. 

The more rational and the generally 
accepted theory regarding the origin of 
the society of Freemasons is that it is 
the successor of the buildmg associations 
of the middle ages, of which the "Stein- 
Tnitzen" or stonemasons of Germany 
were a represenative. 

The historic period of Freemasonry 
begins with the formation of v/hat is 
"known as the premier Masonic grand 
lodge of the world in London, Eng., in 

1717- 

Boston Globe, ]\Iarch 26. 



MYSTERIES OF "RED DEATH." 

In the Russian journal Ural are given 
some amazing details of a mysterious sect 
known as the Red Death. 

The sect has its headquarters at Ekater- 
inoslav, and has many adherents throughout 
the region. They have their temples and 
meet at night for their mysteries, in which 
Ted wine forms a considerable part. 



Th^ feature of this strange sect which 
most strikes the outside world is that asso- 
ciated with its title. When one of the sect 
is at the point of death he is carried to the 
temple, in which is a room with no window, 
but covered— ceiling, walls and floor— with 
red. 

There is no. furniture, but on the floor are 
two cushions. The victim who, in the Jargon 
of the sect, is "ripe for glory,'' is laid on 
the floor with his head on one cushion and 
left alone for some time. 

A young maiden clothed in red then ei> 
ters. slowly approaches the body, and if 
death has not already taken place puts the 
second cushion over the victim's mouth and 
holds it down until all sign of life has gone. 
— Square Deal. 



The Worcester (Mass.) Telegram of 
Dec. 31st, remarked that: 

"The newspapers which committ the 
barbarism of printing Greek letters 
among their English, take on odd looks 
in these days of fraternity conventions. 
New York, Nashville and Atlanta con- 
tributed the reports of Delta Sigma Plii. 
Alpha Kappa Alpha and Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon celebrations for publication in a 
single issue." 



"I BELONG TO THE LODGE." 
Why Men Do Not Attend Church. 

A man with a fair kind of a head, but 
a poor heart, said to the writer, when 
approached for a contribution for ' the 
Bible cause: "No, sir; I don't give any- 
thing to that' cause ; I belong to a 
church good enough for me." 

I said, "\Miat church do vou belong 
to ?" 

He replied: "I belong to the lodge." 

Then I said: "No one but a dolt in 
fraternity matter will claim that a lodge 
is a church." Nevertheless, the secret 
orders are hiding places ; and the mem- 
bers of said orders — including some 
preachers — maintain that if the rules 
governing said secret orders are lived up 
to there is nothing more needed for time 
and eternity. If this is true, we do not 
have to go far to ascertain why so few 
men attend our churches. The lodges get 
the men and the preachers, too. The pas- 
tor who belongs to a lodge is the last one 
who should complain of preaching to 



30 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1901 



audiences depleted of men. This sad 
state of things prevails not only in Eng- 
land and Germany, but also in many 
parts of the United States. The apostle 
Paul said: "This one thing I do." The 
late Bishop Gilbert used to say to his 
conferences : ''Cut loose from all en- 
tanglements.'' — John Thompson, in Caii- 
fornia Christian Advocate. 



ABOLISH FRATERNITIES. 

Grand Rapids, Mich., Votes Against Pub= 

lie School Lodges. 

High school fraternities must eo. The 
Board of Education has struck the long 
expected blow and adopted the report of 
the special committee which declared the 
secret fraternities bad things for the 
students and the schools and asked that 
they be abolished. 

But the fraternities must go absolute- 
ly; if not willingly, then forcibly. Pres- 
sure will be brought to bear upon the 
parents and the students first. If this 
fails to bring about the abolition then the 
members of the fraternities will be de- 
barred from all school activities except 
recitation and graduation. 

The report of the committee declared 
that investigation all over the country 
proved to the satisfaction of the mem- 
bers of the committee that the fraterni- 
ties among students from sixteen to 
eighteen years of age and of immature 
mifids were bad for the students and for 
the schools. The National Educational 
Association had adopted a resolution to 
this effect and several other bodies of 
similar nature. 

Frat Members Poor Students, 

The committee declared that the fra- 
ternities raise a barrier of caste in the 
schools. 

That the standing of the members of 
the fraternities is from 7 to lo per cent 
low er than that of those outside the f rats 
was another ' point shown up and the 
board thought there were sufficient 
grounds for declaring them a detriment 
to the schools and asking their abolition. 

Copies of the report will be sent to 
the parents of all children about to enter 
the schools and teachers are asked not 
to assist the frat members in publishing 
their books or in their other activities. 



If this method does not break up the 
societies the screws will be put down and 
all members barred from school activi- 
ties. 

The Resolutions. 

The board adopted the following reso- 
lutions : 

"Resolved, That in the opinion of this 
board secret societies in the high schools 
in the city of Grand Rapids are detri- 
mental to the best interests of the pupils 
and that their existence should be dis- 
couraged. 

"Resolved further, That the parents of 
all high school students should be ad- 
vised of the conclusions reached by this 
board, and their co-operation in prevent- 
ing their children from joining these high 
school fraternities be requested. 

"Resolved further, That the teaching- 
force of the city of Grand Rapids be 
instructed to discourage the organization 
and continuance of high school secret 
societies by all honorable and legitimate 
means within their power and to refuse 
to assist their members in the prepara- 
tion of their publications." 

The teachers' salaries matter came up 
for final action and the raise was grant- 
ed. One amendment was made and that 
to the effect that all teachers in the 
grades must be graduates of the State 
Normal school or have had at least two 
years' work in the university. — Grand 
Rapids Evening Press. 



PANIC FOLLOWS 
Work of the "Black Hand." 

Several men with their sleeves rolled 
up were at work in the macaroni shop 
of Pietro Realmutto, in the basement at 
33 Stanton street, while in the rear Real- 
mutto, with his wife and two children, 
Michaelina, 3>2 years old, and Maria, 2 
years old, were fast asleep, when there 
happened something which upset the or- 
der and silence which reigned in the big 
building. The macaroni workers ran out 
into the cold air of early morning, knock- 
ing the pastry stuff right and left in their 
haste; the eighteen families overhead 
awoke in their beds with cries of alarm, 
each mother making a grab for her near- 
est baby. 

The house had shaken as if it had been 



May, 1907, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



31 



a pepper cellar which some giant hand 
had gripped. There had come at the 
same moment a noise which had seemed 
to fill the whole street. Beds rocked, 
pictures were jarred loose from their 
places on the walls, and when the tene- 
ment came to a standstill there could still 
be heard from without the tinkle of fall- 
ing glass. 

''Le Mano Nero," whispered Pietro to 
his wife, white-lipped. ''They have come 
at last." 

Le Mano Nero, the Black Hand, or 
the gang of blackmailers who pass under 
that name, is the bogy of the Italians in 
this city. Whether or not it is a society 
of the Black Hand is immaterial. There 
has been for years a gang or gangs of 
blackmailers who make a business of ex- 
torting money from those Italians who 
are better off in this world's goods than 
their fellows, by threatening them wath 
all sorts of dire calamities in case they 
do not instantly produce the money de- 
manded of them. 

One of these letters, suggestively em- 
bellished with pen and ink sketches of 
stilettos, smoking bombs, etc., is calcu- 
lated to scare the man who receives it 
out of a week's growth. Let a man lay 
by a little nest Qgg and the Black Hand 
is after him. Soon the letter carriers 
bring him letters which destroy his peace 
of mind and make him sleepless at night. 
They tell him that unless he leaves $500 
or $1,000 in a certain place at a certain 
hour and date, or hands it to some con- 
federate of the gang, he stands in dan- 
ger of having his curly-haired boy taken 
away from him and his property de- 
stroyed. 

If he is a timid man he is afraid to tell 
Joe Petrosino, who, with his assistants, 
is doing all that he can do to root out 
this particular class of criminals. Then 
he watches over his offspring with fear 
and trembling, or is like a man who is 
continually seeing: a ghost — except when 
he pays. Then they let him alone. 

And one fine day comes the bomb and 
wreck and ruin to his business, which he 
has built up after years of the hardest 
kind of labor, or his boy is gone. The 
heartless rascals taunt the fond father's 
heart bv notifvino- him that his bov will 



be done away with if he does not pay 

ransom. 

—The New York Evening Sun, Xow 17, IDOfJ. 



WHAT PEOPLE TALK ABOUT. 
Know=Nothing Party. 

William F. Allen, Laconia, X. H.^ 
The know-nothing party was a secret po- 
litical party organized in 1853 for the 
purpose mainly of opposing foreign-born 
citizenship. As early as 1835 an attempt 
was made to originate some such move- 
ment in New York city. This move- 
ment, how^ever, ended in failure before 
the election for Mayor in 1837. The 
feeling, however, was again revived in 
1843. Ii^ the following year the same 
native feeling was extended through 
New Jersey to Philadelphia, where sev- 
eral riots occurred between native and 
foreign-born citizens. 

The agitation resulted in natives hold- 
ing the majority of offices for several 
years. In 1852, however, Vv^hen the sec- 
tional contest as to the extension of slave 
territory became so strong, and when the 
democratic party was receiving rein- 
forcements from immigrants, the old op- 
position to foreign-born people again ap- 
peared, but this time in the form of a 
secret oath-bound fraternity, whose ob- 
jects were not even made known to its 
own members till they had reached the 
higher degrees. Whenever am' questions 
were asked the members by outsiders, 
they would say, 'T don't know," and 
from this circumstance the popular name 
of "know-nothing" was given them. 

In the elections of 1854 they appeared 
as a well-disciplined party, carrying Mas- 
sachusetts and Delaware, and in the fol- 
lowing year they polled 122,282 votes in 
New York state and made great strides 
in the south. 

In the presidential campaign of 1856 
the know-nothing party was called the 
"American party," and presented Mil- 
lard Fillmore as its candidate. He car- 
ried Maryland. The party soon disap- 
peared from the political field. — Boston 
Globe. 



One of the last things n.ien learn is 
that God's plans for them are Ix^Uer than 
their own. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1907, 



STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
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ON FREEMASONRY 

FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of Unity Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
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of each degree, by I'resident J. Blanchard, of 
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character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
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This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
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REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP I L L U S - 
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REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIT~ 
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An exact copy of the new official ritual 
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MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
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KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

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HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne. I'ast Master of Key- 
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FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character. Claims and Practical Work- 
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WASHINGTON, LINCOLN AND THEIR CO- 
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This booklet contains fifteen portraits of 
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To get thei-e thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
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By Rev. .Tames P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
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Compiled by Rev. H. IL Ilinman. showing 
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REVISED REEEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 
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Revi.sed amended official "Ritual for Rebekah 
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SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 
221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERNS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

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CONTENTS. 



Annual Meeting— Official Call 33 

Thaw Trial *33 

Elks in Philadelphia *33 

Ohio Convention 33 

Grand Generalissimo and Illustrious and 

Imperial Potentates 33 

Antiquity of Masonry *34 

Sorority Is Conclusively Exclusive 3-1 

The Lodge Dominating the Church. By 

Rev. G. A. Pegram 35 

President Blanchard's Letter — High 

School and College Fraternities 38 

Purdue University Fraternities. By Jo- 

siah W. Leeds 40 

The Preaching Required by the Times. By 

Rev. H. H. Hinman 41 

The "Court of Honor" *42 

Unprofitable Exchange (Masonry) 42 

The Shriner Wreck 43 

Opportunities to Save the Country 44 

A Profane Travesty Upon Easter 44 

Eagles' Memorial Service 45 

Negroes May Use Elks' Lodge Emblems.. . 45 

Masonic Jesuits 46 

Vatican and Lodge 46 

Camorra ; 47 

Webster's Dictionary 47 

National N. C. A. Convention Program. .48-49 
The Ancient Degree of O. M 50 



Tammuz (Masonry) 50 

Really "Dependent on Tradition" (Ma- 
sonry) .51 

Hardly Damon 52 

Masonry the Embodiment of All Truth. . . 5^ 

Testimony of Adhering Masons ,. . . 53 

High School Brand of Fraternities 54 

Oblivious Victims of Lodgery 54 

A Permanent Hiatus — Masonic Noninfor- 

mation 55 

News of Our Work 56 

Pennsylvania Convention — State Officers, 

etc 56 

W. B. Stoddard's Letter. 57 

Michigan Agent's Report. 58 

Francis James Davidson's Report 60 

From Mrs. Woods 62 

From Our Mail 63 • 



MODERN SECRET SOCIETIES 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., Pres. Wheaton Coltege. 

FEATURES OF THE BOOK 

An important subject clearly 
and comprehensively handled. 
Is kindly In tone^ iTs c" "Tided into 
short, interestit'O hapters, and 
is admirably e a; ted to aid bnsy 
people. It ans'/c^'s the question, 
what Jesus would have one do. 

The Christian Endeavoe 
World calls it : 

''AN ILLUMINATING BOOK." 
Plan ot the Work : Part First 
answers objections, and clears ' 
away the obstacles to a candid 
consideration of the question. 
Part Second treats of Free- 
masonry as the key to the whol^ subject. Part 
Third relates to subsidiary ordors — industrial, 
insurance, temperance and other lodges. Part 
Fourth considers important questions grow- 
ing out of this discussion, such a?: "What Do 
Lodge Burials Teach?" "Does Opposition tp 
Lodges Injure the Persons or Churches that 0^ 
fer If? " " The Duty of the Hour," etc. 

300 pages ; cloth, 75 cents ; leather, $1.00. Ad- 
dress all orders to 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 West Madison Street, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 

Entered at the Post Offi-ce, Chicago. III., a» 

se^'ond class matter 




VOLUME XL. 



CHICAGO, JlNK, 1907. 



NUMBER 2. 



ANNUAL MEETING 

OF THE NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSO- 
CIATION, JUNE 13 AND 14, 1907. 
The annual meeting of the National 
Christian Association will occur on Thurs- 
day and Friday, June 13 and 14, 1907, at 
10 o'clock a. m., in Wheaton College, 
Wheaton, 111., for the election of officers 
and the transaction of other important 
business. 

C. A. BLANCHARD, President. 

N. E. KELLOGG, Recording Secretary. 



It will be remembered that a juror in 
the Thaw trial was sought to be influ- 
enced i)y a policeman on duty there, on 
the ground of Thaw's father and this 
juror being members of the same secret 
lodge. The twenty-five policemen who 
were in attendance at the Thaw trial 
have been examined by the district attor- 
ney, and it is stated that the one in ques- 
tion was found. It is said that he did 
not commit a crime in speaking to a 
juror as he did, but that he violated the 
police rules, and might be punished. 



The city council of Fhiiadelphia has 
appropriated $50,000 for municipal dec- 
orations and the entertainment of the 
convention of the Order of Elks which 
is. to meet in that city in July next. What 
protest are the people of Philatlelphia 
making who are opposed to such a use 
of their taxes? 



Elk teeth as the emblem of the order 
will probably be used no more after the 
convention of the grand lodge in Phila- 
delphia. "President Roosevelt has re- 
quested the Grand Exalted Ruler to use 
his influence to bring about such a de- 
cision, and his request will probably be 
acceded to." 



Friends in. central New York wishing 
the services of W. B. Stoddard and PL 
R. Smith, Jr., during July, will do well 
to write this office as soon as possible. 



OHIO CONVENTION. 

We call your attention to the letter of 
Secretary Stoddard in this number. 
Doubtless the convention will be held 
the last part of June. As the forms of 
the Cynosure close on the 20th of the 
preceding month, it is impossible for us 
to give the program in this number. 

Secretary Stoddard hopes to have 
during this month in Ohio the services 
of ]\lr."H. R. Smith, Jr., of Leonards- 
burg, Ohio, who has made a special 
study of the lodge question. He is a 
graduate of the Ohio Wesleyan L^niver- 
sity. We heartily commend him to the 
readers of the Cynosure, and hope that 
many will write to this oflice engaging 
Secretary Stoddard and Brother Smith 
for one or more meetings in their towns. 



Faith in God breaks all shackles. 



GRAND GENERALISSIMO AND ILLUS- 
TRIOUS AND IMPERIAL POTENTATES. 

Gentlemen will please remove their 
hats. Tliis spring the Grand Generalis- 
simo of the Grand Comniandery of the 
States of Massachusetts and Rhode Isl- 
and, which do not need to be called 
grand, makes the annual visitation of 
Springfield (Mass.) K. T. Commandery 
and enjoys a banquet. 

Likewise the P-nperial Potentate, jour- 
nc}'ing on llie swift dromedary all the 
way from the mysterious city of St. 
Joseph, Missouri, beyond the mighty 
river, selects Springfield as the only city 
in New England in which to pitch his 
camp. Tlie Xobles of Melha Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine meet in a ceremonial 
session, and a sumptuous banquet is 
served. The Blustrious Potentate of 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, IIX)"; 



Melha Temple issues proclamations, and 
the grand array of nobles encamped 
there and thereabout, or, rather, in tem- 
ples where Allah is named, are urged to 
betake themselves to the Lyman Street 
]\Iosque to "eat salt" with the Nobles 
and their Imperial Potentate. So grand 
an invitation, from so illustrious a 
source, could not but be potential. 



the liiuiian race and guiding them to a no- 
bler, truer, higher life of usefulness. 



Those who have wondered at the in- 
fatuation of some ]\Iasons, may get a 
glimpse of what is brought to bear on 
a class of minds represented in the lodge, 
in extracts which we take from an ar- 
ticle by H. F. Long in the Masonic 
A^oice-Review for May, 19O1. There are 
of course many to whom such matter 
is both credible and impressive. 

Way back in the dim ages of the past, in 
the beginning of recorded time, evidences of 
Masonry are found. It is the oldest of 
earth's institutions. Since its commencement 
many nations have risen, flourished, and 
fallen to decay. Nothing is left of thecn but 
their ruins and the history of their grandeur. 
Masonry, through all these changing vicissi- 
tudes of time, through centuries on centu- 
ries of changing eras, changing nations, and 
changing governments, and through opi>osi- 
tion and persecution, has steadily moved on- 
ward in its noble work of teaching men how 
to live better and better. It is a grand thing 
to live, but nobler, grander still to live right. 

Masonry teaches man to live so as to shun 
the superfluities and vices that surround 
him, and so that when he is done with his 
earthly work he will be fit for the Master's 
use. 

Every man that we receive, make better. 
and build up to a higher standard of moral- 
ity, helps the surrounding community, in- 
creases the usefulness of Masonry, and aids 
in perpetuating the purest and grandest of 
all orders, where men of different nationali- 
ties, different political opinions, and differ- 
ent religious creeds, meet and work together 
in harmony, for one common purpose, ce- 
menting their work into one mass, in broth- 
erly love and in unity, for the good of all, 
thereby benefiting themselves, their associ- 
ates, and all who come in contact with them. 

The principles of Masonry have been 
handed down from generation to generation, 
each succeeding one zealously guarding its 
God-given tenets from innovation, preserving 
the original purity of the work that was 
given to man for bettering the condition of 



CONCLUSIVELY EXCLUSIVE. 

Rather than sacrifice its sacred social 
prestige, a sorority that for a dozen years 
has infested a high school in a wealthy 
suburb of Boston will disband and be- 
come an exalted memory. The fatal 
cause of its decease is the admission of 
some members whose "social standing" 
was below the standard ; though this 
seems to have had reference not to the 
standing of pupils in the school, but to 
their fathers' rating in Bradstreet- and 
the kind of dry goods their mothers were 
in the habit of exhibiting. During its 
long existence the faculty and students 
have been dissatisfied with the snob so- ' 
ciety, and its loss will cause limited 
mourning. Its leading members come 
from the wealthiest families in Brook- 
line, and these have evidently had trials 
on their side, for at a recent meeting it 
was decided that Brookline high school 
lacks, at present, material for society 
membership that is up to the social 
standard. In this sad condition of things 
it was voted to elect new members only 
from Alumnae of the school. This will 
partly redeem the standing of the society 
into which only girls whose parents were 
wealthy have been admitted. 

Miss Florence M., the Secretary, re- 
fused to talk, but referred the reporter 
to the President, Miss Olive B. Singu- 
larly, he made no further reference to 
Olive. Miss Helen F., a graduate and 
one of the leading members of the tony 
society, said this : 

"The Tau Beta Beta Society will still 
exist, but hereafter the members will be 
elected from the alumnae of the school,, 
instead of from the upper two classes 
of the school. It will probably be an- 
other year before the society disbands, 
as there is one more chapter to be ad- 
mitted before the time for disbandment 
arrives." 

"Pause here! The far-off' world, at last. 
Breathes free." 



The touch of love that goes with the 
gift is more than the gift without the 
love. 



June. IIX) 



CllKISilAN CV.NUSUKE. 



35 



(iontribulion^. 



THE LODGE DOMINATING THE 

CHURCH. 

A Personal Testimony of an M. E. Min= 

ister. 

REV. G. A. PEGRAM. 

The lodge is doing the church more 
harm than any other single e\'il. 

The saloon is outside of the church. 
But the lodge is not only in the church, 
but m the pulpit. It is hard for any in- 
stitution to fight evils within its own bor- 
ders. As long as evils are within, they 
hold the balance of power and wield a 
dominating influence over all opposing 
forces. AX'hile within, evil is both con- 
taminating and dominating. -But a de- 
cisive battle has been won when regnant 
evils have been forced to the door and 
beyond : for forever after they play a 
losing game. 

It is said that the majority of the min- 
isters of popular denominations, as well 
as the merely fashionable and popular 
churches, are members of lodges. There 
is reason for such rumors, and they are 
more than mere rumors. They are v«- ell- 
established facts. Lodge men say. "Let 
us get the pastors, and then we can get 
their flock." So every inducement is 
held out to the pastors of all churches 
which tolerate secret societies to get them 
to join the lodge. 

Several times I have been invited to 
join, and every time when anything at 
all was said about it, I was frankh- told 
that it should not cost me a cent for 
initiation fee or dues either. Sometimes 
they make a plea that they wanr a chap- 
lain. A ^Methodist minister told me that 
this was the persuasion that mduced him 
to join the Maccabees. A Methodist 
bishop told me he jomed the ]\lasons be- 
cause they wanted a chaplain. Another 
plea is that a minister can do so much 
good in the lodge. He can get in touch 
with the men, get close to the men, get 
acquainted with them, and so wield an 
influence over them. Then they sav the 
men will come to the church, and so he 
can do them good there, get them to be- 
come Christians and join the church. 



Then they will support the church and 
minister. 

The trouble is, lodge members join 
the church not because the\- love the 
Lord or the minister loves the Lord, but 
because they both love the lodge. Christ 
said. "And 1, if I be lifted up, will draw 
all men unto me."' It is the cross, and 
not the lodge countersigns, that is the 
attractive power of the Christian church. 
It is grace and not grips that makes men 
Christians. Prayer is the sesame of the 
kingdom, not passwords. Nevertheless, 
this lodge electioneering draws many of 
the pastors and more of the people into 
the lodge net. 

I desire to show how church affairs 
are manipulated and controlled by the 
lodge system. The views expressed 
herein are not theories or opinions, but 
facts and incidents, which have for the 
most part come under my own observa- 
tion. A few of the incidents are given 
on reliable testimony. A close observer 
does not need to search ver}' long to find 
such incidents for himself. Incidents 
similar to several of these have occurred 
in nearly every community. The gen- 
eral opinions of the people regarding 
lodge manipulation are not baseless 
flights of fancy or the ungrounded imag- 
inations of the ignorant, but are the re- 
luctant convictions forced upon them by 
the operations of the hand which mem- 
bers of the lodge have sought in vam to 
conceal. 

First, in regard to ministers" and their 
appomtments. Ambitious human nature 
as a rule will use all available means for 
its advancement. As a rule, too, minis- 
ters who are members of lodges have 
their full share of worldl}' ambitions. 
Those wlio remain non-members no 
doubt have some worldly ambition, but 
not enough, however, to override all 
their scruples against membership in se- 
cret societies, while the opposite is true 
of those who are members. 

I think It will not be questioned by 
fair-mmded men that quite a few, if not 
the majority of ministers who are meni- 
bers of lodges will use lodge influence 
to get and hold a good appointment. A 
presiding elder told me quite a number 
of vears ao'o that some of the lodge min- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June. 1907. 



isters would go around from place to 
place and lecture for the lodge just to 
get a pull. A minister preached for me 
several years ago on one occasion, and 
told some of the lodgemen privately that 
he would give them a lecture on the se- 
cret work of the lodge. He was very 
popular there with the lodge folks. A 
iMasonic minister said some other lodge 
ministers were working lodge wires for 
all they were worth for good appoint- 
ments. 

One minister who had joined the lodge 
for the sake of msurance told me some 
of the ministers joined every lodge in 
the community for the sake of the pull 
and prestige it gave them. He also gave 
me an insight into the methods which the 
unscrupulous used in manipulating 
lodges to get a good appointment. When 
such ministers desire another or better 
appointment they request their fellow 
lodgemen to wnite letters to relatives or 
friends w^ho are members of the church 
they desire. It is not known that such 
writers are members of the lodge to 
which said minister belongs. Thev are 
only supposed to be friends or parishion- 
ers of the minister over whom thev are 
very enthusiastic. They are not even 
supposed to be recommending him ; sim- 
ply praising him. So by some unknown 
means the said minister suddenly be- 
comes immenselv popular with a few 
leading men in that church. A propa- 
ganda is started in his favor. If the 
present pastor of that church is not him- 
self a lodgeman, he and his v/ork are 
both discounted now. He immediatelv 
begins to have opposition for v/hich he 
can see no reason at all, unless perchance 
he already has an insight into the secret 
workings of the lodge svstem in church 
affairs. N.o amount of work, sacrifice, 
devotion, spirituality, success or popular- 
ity outside of lodges makes any differ- 
ence. The doom of his pastorate is seal- 
ed there. In case of his removal, no suc- 
cessor will ever suit except a lodge mem- 
ber, or a lodge sympathizer. T once rec- 
ommended a young minister who was a 
Mason for the secretaryship of a Y. M. 
C. A. I had always had a hieh regard 
for him. As soon as he entered town he 
hunted up his fellow lodgemen and at- 



tended his lodge the very first night he 
was there. As only two or three Masons 
were connected with the Y. M. C. A. in 
that town, and others did not favor him, 
he failed to get the position. This was 
not simply hearsay. He told me him- 
self. The Masonic members favored 
him. The others did not. 

In more than one instance I have 
known lodgemen who were not members 
of the church at all to circulate petitions 
for the return of pastors who were fel- 
low lodgemen. I heard of one man who 
was a saloonkeeper, that got up a peti- 
tion for the return of a minister. They 
were members of the same lodge. . He 
got residents and sojourners, saints and 
sinners, mostly sinners, to sign it. The 
spiritual people did not want him. But 
the bishop and presidmg elder did not • 
know that, and probably did not care. 
He was not returned, but he was pro- 
moted on the strength of his popularity 
thereby expressed. Had such a petition 
from worldly lodgemen and sinners been 
adverse to the pastor, he would not have 
been returned or promoted either, but 
"demoted," as his successor was. For 
this man's friends were opposed to his 
successor, because he was not a lodge- 
man, and refused to join, although in- 
vited more than once to do so. 

The same spirit which will "boost" one 
man because he is a lodgeman will dis- 
count and disparage another because he 
is not. There was an instance of this 
on a charge adjoining mine several years 
ago. A young minister with scarcely a 
common school education, and but little 
experience, was appointed to the charge. 
A man of the town, not a member of the 
church, was very loud in his praises to 
another minister in an adjoining county, 
declaiming he was the best minister they 
had ever had. When told that there had 
been a number of able, educated, experi- 
enced ministers there who were good 
speakers and very successful, and when 
asked what was the man's drawing card, 
that he was liked better than all his 
predecessors, nearly all of whom were 
abler than he, reply w^as made, "He is 
going to join our lodge." That settled 
it, and that was sufficient. His successor 
was not a lodgeman and was "no good at 



June, 1907, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



37 



all," said a Masonic minister on an ad- 
joining charge,, after hearing the views 
of the other man's parishioners, although 
he was a very able, educated, zealous 
preacher. But the next man was another 
Mason and "everybody liked him/' "ex- 
cept a few fanatics who don't believe in 
anything but their peculiar views." 

I was recently told of a minister here 
in Michigan who was noted for his zeal 
and success in revival work. Souls were 
saved in goodly numbers everywhere he 
went. In spite of his success he was 
kept on small charges, paying from three 
to five hundred dollars. He was kept on 
charges of that grade for fifteen or twen- 
ty years. His unusual usefulness fur- 
nished no reason nor prospect for his pro- 
motion. Some of his worldly minded 
friends persuaded him that he- could do 
more good if he would join the Masons. 
He did so. Two results followed : First, 
he immediately lost ground in his own 
religious experience, and along with an 
impaired Christian experience he lost 
also his old-time revival zeal, power and 
success. Nevertheless, his impaired use- 
fulness and unspirituality furnished no 
barriers to his promotion now, inasmuch 
as he was a Alason. Immediately the 
next conference appointed him to a 
charge paying $800, and then to one pay- 
ing $1,000, the like of wdiich he scarcely 
dreamed of holding, while he VN-as use- 
ful and .successful, but not a Mason. 
His friends noticed the wane of his spir- 
ituality and power, and made remarks 
and queries to him about it. He stated 
that he lost in his experience and power 
when he was made a Mason. They asked 
him why he did not leave it then. He 
said he ''did not dare to do so, for they 
would hound him to death if he left 
them." Pelf and position are bribes to 
ministers to become and remain loyal 
lodgemen. 

Not only do members of churches and 
outsiders pull lodge wires to get lodge 
ministers appointed as pastors, but bish- 
ops and presiding elders join the lodge 
orchestra to play the same tune. If they 
keep their lodge oaths they are required 
to do so. As lodge oaths and church 
vows are diametrically opposed to each 
other, one who is a member of both 



church and lodge cannot keep both. And 
as we, hear men continually declaring 
they must keep their lodge oaths con- 
cerning secrecy, even though you quote 
Lev. 5: I, 4, 5, concerning the illegality 
of such oaths, it is nothing more than 
reasonable to suppose that they regard 
lodge oaths more binding than their 
church vows concerning right, truth and 
justice. If so, church dignitaries are 
more interested in promoting lodge min- 
isters, and so fulfilling their oaths, than 
they are in doing justice and rewarding 
merit. If the church members are equal- 
ly divided between lodge members and 
non-members, most bishops and presid- 
ing elders are careful to always side with 
the half that belongs to the lodge. This 
is not opinion or hearsay. 1 have seen it 
exemplified more than once here in 
Michigan. I have seen presiding elders 
turn down ministers who were living 
straight lives, and preaching a straight 
and full gospel, because a few lodge- 
men were opposed to him. I have seen 
the same presiding elder, the same year, 
uphold a minister who used tobacco and 
vile language, and belonged to a number 
of lodges, even though man}- were op- 
posed to him, because a few lodgemen 
stood by him. Two years ago a minis- 
ter in the Detroit Conference told me a 
presiding elder came to him at confer- 
ence and asked him if he was a ]\Ia- 
son. He replied that he was. The pre- 
siding elder told him if he was he want- 
ed to send him to a certain appointment 
which paid $1,000 and had a good par- 
sonage. Afterwards when I was telling 
him that lodges wrought injustice in 
manipulating ministerial appointments, 
he declared that lodges had nothing to 
do with preachers' appointments. But I 
have long since learned that the words 
of neither ministers nor church members 
amount to a row of pins when the honor 
of their lodge is at stake. 

\\'hile in college a classmate and close 
friend of mine was telling of the work 
and positions of his father, who was a 
Methodist minister. In tracing his itin- 
erancv he said on one occasion his father 
wanted to go to a certain appointment. 
Some of the members there did not want 
him. He said, "But father is a ^lason, 



CHKiSTlA^^ CYN05SUKE. 



June. IfMtl. 



and the bishop was a ]\iason, and the 
bishop sent him there anyhow." Xow, 
the question is. where did this young man 
get such a notion? Did the bishop tell 
him so. or his father, or some ^lasonic 
parishioner? Evidently the idea was not 
original with the son. Xow., if ^lethodist 
bishops and presiding elders do not give 
ministers appointments they desire, just 
because they are Masons, or are mem- 
bers of some other lodge, some of the 
ministers and their children ^eem to 
think so. as well as a great host of other 
people. ]^Ioreover. no amount of denial 
on the part of such appointing power 
will change their minds. 

This is in perfect accord with the ad- 
vice of a ministerial friend of mine, who 
told me I ought to join these secret so- 
cieties, too. so I could get a pull just 
like the others did. When I was in the 
theological school at Boston, a crowd of 
theologues were discussmg whether it 
was right or wrong to belong to secret 
societies. Some said one thing and some 
another. Finally one brother said. "Well, 
it does not seem just riglit, but it seems 
that a man cannot have a fair chance 
imless he belonged to some of them." 
And to that statement nearly every one 
agreed. It was certainly so there, for 
the members of a certain strong Greek 
letter fraternity boasted that their lodge 
had nearly all the good student appoint- 
ments. I notice the same thing in con- 
ference. The young ministers who be- 
long to certain Greek letter fraternities 
associate mostly with one another. And 
if one gets on a committee, some of the 
rest are soon promoted. Outsiders are 
not told how and wh}'. Of course, merit 
would be claimed as the cause. But this 
is far from evident. For iiwir merit is 
scarcely known or noticeable, while oth- 
ers far superior are left otit continually. 
A young man who had been president of 
a college Y. ]vF C. A. told me several 
years ago that while he held said posi- 
tion fraternity men would urge him to 
appoint their men to lead the meetings. 
All these things show very clearly that 
io'lges are set for the fall and rise of 
many in clerical positions as well as in 
others. But the surprise is that those 
who profess to be Christians violate the 



Golden Rule in such things, and never 
seem to notice or care. 



PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 

Dear Fathers and Brethren : 

The public revolt against the high 
school fraternity system of our country 
goes forward rapidly. The last and most 
marked development in this region is 
tlie petition of more than one thousand 
people in Oak Park to the school board 
of that city. A committee of seven la- 
ciies and gentlemen presented the re- 
quest of 1.066 citizens for the abolition 
o' the fraternities in the high school of 
that town. 

The complaint which the petition 
ir;akes against the fraternities is the 
complaint which has always been made 
against lodges. First, they are not need- 
ed. Second, they are selfish and anti- 
social. Third, they are harboring evil. 
Foiitth. they tend toward the destruction 
of childhood and youth. Fifth, they are 
undemocratic, and those who leave them 
are persecuted. Sixth, they cause too 
early fixing of social choice. Seventh, 
tliey are narrowing. Eighth, they are 
likei}- to suggest, stimulate and spread 
immorality. Xinth. there is no adequate 
supervision. Tenth, they create false no- 
tions of social hfe. as consisting of (a) 
a few private friends: (b) private func- 
tions : ( c ) constant amusements. The 
eft'ects of rushing are bad. Snobbery is 
developed. Decent conduct toward 
schoolmates is neglected. They are al- 
most universally condemned b}- teachers. 
The high school board of Oak Park will 
see what it can do to abolish them. The 
opinion is said to be unanimous that they 
are evil and ought to go. 

The Somerville. ]\Iass.. school board 
recentlv took action against secret socie- 
ties for the reasons which are stated in 
the petition of the Oak Park citizens. 

A\'e ought to remember that these high 
school lodges are in every respect, except 
one. identical with older fraternities. 
Anv evil among boys will work more 
rapidly than among men, because the 
bovs are younger and have less self-re- 
straint. Young wood will rot more 
quickly than older wood of the same sort. 
We should remember, too, that killing in 



June. irx>7 



CHPrlSTlAN CYNOSURE. 



39 



the fraternities • is quite as common 
among the boys as among the men : prob- 
ably it is not hidden so well. W'e hear 
reports of killing after killing among the 
lodges, which ought to awaken and is 
awakening the deadly hostility of par- 
ents to these schools of vice and crime. 

A little while ago twenty fraternity 
boys from Chicago were at Channel 
Lake. Wis. After a day and night of 
hilarity, as the newspaper says. v\hen the 
boys were going to bed early Sunday 
morning, one of them took a revolver 
and shot another one of the company. 
He was sixteen }'ears old : he had joined 
the school lodge and was having his good 
time when the end came. 

A little while ago. a student from the 
law school of one of our Chicago uni- 
versities was dancing a jig on the side- 
at it until he dropped in agony : then he 
was poked in the ribs and told to get up. 
One of the young savages who was ini- 
tiating him said, "T think he is just sham- 
mino^ : he ousrht to q-et a srood dose." 

We all remember the case of Kenyon 
College, where a student was tied to the 
track of a railwa\' line and cut to pieces 
■by a passing engine. A\'e remember that 
all evidences of that killing were imme- 
diately and carefully concealed. The 
bloody clothes were hidden away and the 
poor, mangled body was prepared for 
removal from town without any sum- 
mons to the cor.oner. ]\I embers of the 
faculty were reported to have joined with 
the students in efforts to conceal the 
transaction from the public. It was al- 
leged that the death of the student was 
greatly regretted, which of course was 
true. Others testified that all the candi- 
dates they initiated into the D. K. E. 
were tied to the railroad track. There is 
every reason, from the known character 
of secret societies, for believing this to 
be the fact. 

Boys cost too much, while men are 
worth too much, to be slaughtered in 
this fashion. \^et the moral ruin which 
is naturally the result of secret societeies. 
is far worse than the occasional death of 
a young man. 

Another interestmg fact regarding the 
character of secret societies is furnished 
in an article respecting a divorce trial of 



recent date in Camden. X. ]. The wife, 
asking for liberation from her husband, 
testified that he had bought her nothing 
in the way of clothing, except a four- 
dollar coat, during the twelve years of 
married life. When in desperation she 
bought a suit which cost S30, he refused 
to pav the bill. He is reported to have 
said on this occasion that a 98-cent wrap- 
per was good enough for her. When 
her husband took other women to distant 
cities, and she protested, he told her 
that she was not his wife, but merely 
his slave ; and when she read a love let- 
ter which one of these women had writ- 
ten to him, he simpl}- made an angrv de- 
mand for it. The wife also testified' that 
her husband had beaten her. and' that 
when she was ill he brought her pictures 
of tombstones, asking her which one she 
preferred, telling her that she was at the 
point of death. At other times he threat- 
ened to kill her, and when she replied 
that ^^■hen he did he would hang, he said : 
'T am a ^lason : I won't be hanged."" 

Thi*^ sickening narrative sho^vs us how 
vain and foolish is the remark that high 
school fraternities are very evil, while 
fraternities for men. in college and out 
of it. are helpful. Lodges are controlled 
by Satan ; he is the god of secrecy. The 
God of the Bible is light : in him there 
is no darkness at all. As Chancellor 
Crosby said. '"Out of the darkness dark 
deeds grow." There is no question about 
it : it has ever so been, and it will al- 
ways so be. 

Even organizations which profess vir- 
tues as the reason for their existence. 
such as temperance lodges, are like all 
the rest. A writer in the "Lodge Lamp." 
who was fifteen years a member in a se- 
cret temperance order, says : "What can 
we expect of a temperance order hav- 
ing ]\Iasons. Oddfellows and Knights of 
Pythias members for leaders? They are 
yoked up in their orders with saloon- 
keepers and distillers, and when they 
will, the}" can overthrow the work of 
their brothers. 

"V.'hen I became full}- persuaded that 
Good Templarism was a humbug, so far 
as bringin.o: about suppression of the 
liquor traffic was concerned, I said so 
openly. I told my neighbors that I be- 



40 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1901 



lieved that an open society was far bet- 
ter than a secret one. The Deputies got 
angry — abused nie, and tried to ruin my 
character, the same as they do those who 
oppose ]\Iasonry. Why, they said, did 
you not 'promise to support the order, 
under penalty of loss of honor?' Yes; 
but they lied to obtain that promise, and 
that releases me. A promise obtained 
by fr^.ud is not binding. They said the 
obligation did not conflict with my duty 
to my country, my God or my family. 
It conflicts with all three. And by in- 
timidation .they seek to prevent me from 
warning my country and my family from 
spending time and money in vain. We 
are guaranteed freedom of speech by the 
Constitution. If we allow any order to 
take that away from us, we become 
slaves.'' 

This is the testimony of an eye-wit- 
ness. It can be duplicated — not in de- 
tails, but as to its substance — from many 
quarters, 

I was recently talking to a cultivated 
woman, now the wife of a prominent 
pastor. She told me that when she was 
in college she united with a secret so- 
ciety. She said that she shortly found 
that the business of the society was to 
meet Saturday afternoons and spend the 
time in talking about the boys and their 
clothes ; she said that the rich girls who 
composed the society were very mean 
in their treatment of the girls in college 
who did not have money, and that thev 
not only neglected to do anything for 
them, but they were angry with her be- 
cause she tried to help I'hf^m. She said 
that one of the hnest girls in college 
had been there three months before a 
single young woman called upon her. 
She was weeping her heart out from 
loneliness, and yet the sorority girls 
were angry with this young woman be- 
cause she tried to comfort and help her. 
At last, she said, she offered her resig- 
nation, and though she was three years 
after that in college, those girls which 
had been her companions would meet 
her in the halls and on the street and 
neglect to look at or speak to her. Yet, 
she said, the blessings which came to her 
because of her action in regard to that 



lodge were the choicest ones she had 
known during her entire life. 

Closing this letter, I desire to say 
(what I suppose we all have often 
thought) that it is the positive, and not 
the negative, by which men live. What 
this world needs is Jesus Christ. If 
they have him, it matters little what they 
lack ; if they lack him, it matters very 
little what else they have. ''Hating the 
British is not patriotism." Hating lodges,, 
liquor shops, gambling dens, race tracks, 
Sabbath breaking, political corruption 
and social evils is not a guarantee for life 
eternal. If we are saved at all, we are 
saved through Jesus Christ. Let us pray 
more that we may have his mind, follow 
his example, be animated by his Spirit. 
''He that hath the Son hath life, but he 
that hath not the Son shall not see life,, 
but the wrath of God abideth on him.'^ 

Fraternally yours, . 

Charles A. Blanchard. 



PURDUE UNIVERSITY FRATERNITIES. 

A number of years ago — about the year 
1900, I think it was — I had some corre- 
spondence with a student of Purdue I'ni- 
versity, Indiana, the son of a friend of 
mine.. The yaung man, who was much 
opposed to secret societies, wrote me a 
long letter, in which he told how the in- 
stitution would be quite free from ^he 
fraternities were it not for State influ- 
ence. Last month one interested in the 
university wrote me as follows : 

"Purdue LTniversity held Greek Letter 
Societies in check until the Legislature 
passed an act making appropriations un- 
available so long as regulations forbid- 
ding Greek Letter fraternities were in 
force. As Purdue is a State institution, 
nothing was possible except acceptance 
of the conditions. We now have some 
fifteen Greek societies, embracing perhaps 
300 students, but in the midst of the 
1,800 they do not as yet play any con- 
siderable part in student affairs. As far 
as I am able to see their tendency is in 
the direction of increasing the cost of 
the student in a very large way, and in 
developing cliques, and so breaking down 
the university spirit; in giving exceeding- 
ly wrong standards in the judgment of 
men, and in some cases giving centers 'n 



June. irM)7. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



41 



which are developed careless and even 
vicious habits. In our experience, how- 
ever, this latter condition is extremely 
exceptional. The question as to the total 
effect, good or bad, upon the university, 
is not agreed upon by the faculty. In- 
deed, I suppose half of our faculty were 
Greek Letter fraternity men when in 
college. We make it extremely difficult 
for new fraternities to obtain a foothold, 
and in that way have protected the uni- 
versity. 

''In the High Schools, the Greek Letter 
organizations became such a source of 
danger and scandal, that the Legislature, 
at the session just closed, passed an act 
disbanding those in existence, and con- 
ditioning high school privileges upon 
non-membership in such societies." 

The consensus of opinion in the best 
educational circles being that secret fra- 
ternities in the high schools are "s. source 
of danger and scandal," it surely ought 
not to take long to reach the conclusion 
that the development of the same stem 
of sinister growth in the college and' the 
university, must necessarily be attended 
bv serious evils. Tosiah W. Leeds. 



THE PREACHING REQUIRED BY THE 
TIMES. 

BY REV. H. H. HINMAN. 

I recently listened to a discussion of 
the above theme, which I shall not at- 
tempt to reproduce, but desire to note 
some thoughts that were suggested. 
Many of the readers of The Cynosure 
are preachers, and all are interested in 
the preaching of the present day as it is 
and as it ought to be. 

The preaching that will be a blessing 
to humanity, must first of all present 
Christ as the Divine Savior of sinful 
men. No system of ethics, and no form 
of moral culture that does not begin 
with the repentance of selfishness fiay\ 
include the transforming power of faith 
in the Son of God, can avail to save the 
soul, or to benefit and bless society. 

Second. While this is always to be 
insisted on and to be spoken with the 
authority of God's word, it is not the 
whole of the Gospel message. When 
Christ sent His disciples to preach the 
Kingdom of God — that Kingdom that is 



''righteousness, peace and joy in the Holy- 
Spirit," the message included a rebuke 
of all that was inconsistent with the per- 
fect rule of that Kingdom. The Divine 
Law, in all its breadth and including its 
denunciations and threatenings, was a 
part of the message. This, as well as 
the love of God, is fundamental. These 
great facts are to the Christian system 
what the alphabet is to literature. They 
cannot be forgotten or ignored. They 
must continually be remembered and ap- 
plied, or the message is a failure. 

Third. The preaching of the Kingdom 
demands the reproof of specific sins, even 
when those sins are not clearly apparent 
to the average mind, when they find tol- 
erance in a lax public opinion, and even 
when countenanced by some who " we 
hope are Christian brethren. It is espe- 
cially important that first of all the sins 
of God's people be rebuked, always, how- 
ever, in a spirit of meekness and broth- 
erly love. 

From the beginning, the people, both 
saints and sinners, have been inclined to 
"hold'the truth in unrighteousness," and 
the special object of preaching is to call 
attention to ignored and forgotten truths. 

The Bible is full of illustrations of this 
principle — notably the case of Peter on 
the day of Pentecost, who did not hesi- 
tate to tell his Jewish brethren that they 
.had "killed the Prince of Life" and "with 
wicked hands" had crucified and slain 
him. It was with such preaching that 
they were "cut to the heart," and there 
followed the greatest revival in histor\'. 

Among the many things that ought to 
be openly rebuked are, first, the spirit 
and practice of war. Without stopping 
to inquire whether some defensive wars 
might be justifiable, it is abundantly evi- 
dent that war is a great calamity, not 
only to the nations involved, but to all 
the nations of the earth. It is not less 
true that they might be avoided by a 
spirit of justice and conciliation. It is 
abundantly evident that it is not so much 
the spirit of patriotism and the love of 
justice that leads men to delight in war, 
as the spirit of hate and bloodthirstiness, 
the very opposite of the spirit of Christ. 
As disciples of the Prince of Peace and 
as preachers of the Kingdom of Peace, 



42 



CHKISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June. 19<:>T, 



we ought to rebuke the war spirit and 
show ourselves always on the side of 
tliose things that make for international 
and social peace. 

Again, it is our duty to preach against 
the use and sale of intoxicants and nar- 
cotics. Within the past hundred years, 
there has been a marked advance in pub- 
lic sentiment on the question, and espe- 
cialiv in the church : but it is still true 
tliat the use of and traffic in intoxicants 
is one of the most monstrous of the de- 
vices of Satan to lure men to destruc- 
tion, and to destrov the well-being of 
societv: and for this use and this traffic. 
the professed Christian church is largely 
re sponsible. 

Go'd says to us as He said to ancient 
Israel. "Lift up thy voice as a trumpet, 
and show my people their transgressions 
and the house of Jacob their sms. 

Again, there is another power, not less 
seductive and even more strongly en- 
trenched in a perverted pubHc opinion, 
which must certainly be overcome be- 
fore the coming of the Kingdom of God 
— the secret lodge system. Here in Ober- 
lin, its per\'erting iniiuence is seen in that 
it largely takes tlie place of Christianity. 
^Iv nearest brother is a professed Chris- 
tian, but he is Xoble Grand of the I. O. 
O. F.. and does net go to church any- 
where. The next nearest — a most amia- 
ble man and a member of the First Con- 
gregational Church — when invited to at- 
tend our section prayer meeting, excused 
himself on the ground that the lodge 
met on the same night. He is. I think, 
an officer in the lodge. 

During our late revival, the lodge peo- 
ple were conspicuous by their absence. 
We thank Brother Lyon for his faithful 
testuriony. but we pray tliat our ministers 
may have tlie courage of their convic- 
tions, and that as a people we may not 
••hold the truth in unrighteousness."" 

AA'hat we need is tlie faithfulness that 
Paul demanded of Timothy — "T charge 
thee in the sight of God and of Christ 
Jesus, who shall judge the quick and the 
dead, and by His appearing and His 
Kingdom: preach tlie Word: be instant 
in season : reprove, rebuke, exhort, with 
all longsuttering and teaching."" H. Tim. 
4:1. 27 



^Mtorial. 



Those interested in a fraternal or- 
ganization called the Court of Honor, 
may possibly get infoniiation of interest 
by addressing Rev. H. E. Jacobs. Pleas- 
ant Plains. Illinois, and enclosing to him 
2=. cents for his pamphlet on "The Prin- 
ciples of •Woodcraft* and 'Court of Hon- 
or' Weio^hed and Found Wanting"." 



The JJ'asJii^i^TOi. \D. C.t Herald of 
^lay 3 gives an extended notice of the 
grand ball which marked the close of 
the ^Masonic fair, which netted about 
S70.000 for the temple, all of which is, 
of course, charitv T -\ 



Satan is •'the god of this world.'" He 
seeks the worship of men. He is the 
rival of the God of the Bible. His ways 
are various : in our country, he organizes 
sz-nte as ^Mormons, others as Christian 
Scientists, but a greater number as ]\Ia- 
sons : and members of each claim their 
organization to be •"founded on the 
Bible:'' Satan comes as an "angel of 
light." and his agents as '•ministers of 
righteousness." and many believe the 
statement, •'founded on the Bible." and 
join in the worship of the god of this 
world. By these organizations Christ 
is dethroned and Satan exalted. 

In view of the facts, is the solemn 
declaration too sweeping, of the late P^ev. 
Charles G. Finney, once with an inter- 
national reputation as an evangelist and 
teacher, and himself also a seceding ^[a- 
son. when he wrote : 

"Those Zi'ho adhere intelligently and 
determinedly to Freemasonry haz'e no 
yjgjit in file Christian Chureh." — "The 
Character. Claims and Practical \\'ork- 
ings of Freemasonr}-." by Charles G. 
Finnev. ex-rresident of Oberlin CoUej-e. 



UNPROFITABLE EXCHANGE. 

L'nequal yoking with ]\Iasc'nic unbe- 
lievers binds a moral man to unequal 
exchange of advantages, because the 
kind of help he swears to give is such as 
he cannot need in return. He is also 
left without the compensating satisfac- 
tion of doing good, hoping for nothing 



Juno. 1007. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



43 



MlH^C IlC 



ijur-L V'\_t. 



■w'L ;:i\."^'(_i. 



e\"il. All crimes save two exceptions being 
included in the rule, he is obliged to 
render assistance such as he could not 
ask again. 

A moral man considering die question 
of becoming a ^lason, would proceed in 
a business-like way if he should repeat 
the method he used in changing occupa- 
tion or 'transferring investment of capi- 
tal. This would involve ascertaining ad- 
vantages ottered, as well as disadvant- 
ages that must be incurred. Pending a 
full understanding of what the ^lason's 
oath requires, he would ask what the 
corresponding obligation of other Masons 
offered him. Thus he would ask him- 
self, what am I to get out of it? What 
is the nature and amount of probable 
di\-idend? If I give what is asked, 'what 
am I likely to ask in return ? In case we 
have occasion to fulfill on both sides the 
oatli to keep personal secrets witli perfect 
security ( which is the purport of a prom- 
inent obligation), what will be tlie net 
result ? 

He has not the same reason to become 
a Mason as a different man engaged in 
crime. He does not intend to steal, bum 
buildings, commit periur}-. burglanr or 
highway robbery. Secrets of which mur- 
der and treason are the characteristic and 
indicative exceptions, are outside the 
range of any likely to become his own. 
Such as he may have occasion to com- 
municate will not require ™lent oaths. 
\\'hat secrets do moral men have, that 
incline tliem to bind other men with 
oaths and death penalties? What secrets, 
that ought not to be di\~ulged. do they 
themselves need to be thus sworn to 
keep, under penaltv- of being murdered? 

If. then, it produces notliing for him 
and other men of his class, why should a 
respectable man allow an oatli and death 
penalty, or threat of secret assassination, 
to be imposed upon him. in order that 
when men different from himself need 
his help in hiding wickedness they :::av 
call on him without hesitation? This 
looks like poor investment of large 
values. The fleeced lamb of that market 
pays hea\y premium on stocks ^^■hich pay 
no di^-idends to any but preferred credi- 
tors. He thus incurs loss exceeding fail- 



ure : '\\-s r^z- Siiare in resuits. lor. 
wh: < services such as would 

not r.avc passed either way between him 
and otliers witliout reference to Masonic 
shackles, in that act Jie also forfeits his 
own character by complicity in crime. 
Therefore his share in the issue becomes, 
first, nothing: then, worse than nothing. 
^Masonry has afforded him this conveni- 
ent way to effect an unequal exchans^e 
and conclude an unDronrable barsrain. 



THE SHRINER W RECK. 

The 'Tsn:a:ia'" special :rai:: ci Xew 
York and Pennsylvania Xobles of the 
Mystic Shrine was wrecke : '^ "nda. 
Cal.. Saturday. INIay ii. v ::inc^ 

fift}- miles an hour on the Southern Pa- 
cific Coast Line. It had covered sixt\-- 
one miles in one hundred minutes on 
the crcx^ked track leading from Santa 
Barbara to Honda. The train carried 
145 Shriners from Isnialia Temple. Buf- 
falo. X. Y.. Rajah Temple. Reading. Pa.. 
and neighboring cities, who were return- 
ing from the annual meeting of the An- 
cient Arabic Order of the Xobles of the 
Mystic Shr::. .: ^.:s Angeles. Twenty 
were injure . :. /, . :':irt}--one dead. 

It was hours before relief arrived. En- 
gmeer Frank Chapman, who was thro\\Ti 
witli the cab far beyond the vrrecked 
engine, got up. r:.:: :, -Me i:r help, then 
first discovered : ::.: he v.as severelv 
scalded and had a broken an::, Tde din- 
ing car fell on tlie locomotive, .m:/. :hirtv- 
t«-o persons at luncheon, ir.osr of whom 
were killed. One woman had gone into 
the baggage car to arrange her trunk: 
her body was driven through the fi<oor. 
so tliat the car was jacked up to take the 
body out. Another woman was under 
the heavy baggage, but protected bv an 
arch of trunks : when rescuers burrowed 
their way to her, she seized the foot of 
one oi the men and shouted : *T'll not let 
go •- • : ; .: get me out."" Then she was 
tern hi : .:rned by scalding steam, al- 
though she was taken out alive. Two 
women were imder tlie burning dinino^- 
r-^:::: car. one begging piteously for re- 
lief. With a hose wrenched from a 
coach connection, a man threw water 
from a tank, extinguishing the flames. 
He cut awav the timbers that held her. 



44 



CflRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 11X>7. 



then lifted her out just as a stream of 
hot water poured over her. She soon 
expired. 

Back to Santa Barbara went the dead 
Shriners in six hours, who had come to 
their death in one hundred minutes. At 
a lonely switch far out in a real desert, 
with no habitation near and no wire com- 
munciation anywhere, lay the sidetrack- 
ed train of the dead, while train after 
train of other Shriners went unconscious- 
ly by on their way over the same track 
toward home. 

The dreadful nature of this awful dis- 
aster is intensified to the consciousness 
of one who reflects what the errand of 
the victims had been, and what it was in 
which they were taking part. This seems 
like death visibly encountered in the diz- 
ziest speed down the broad road. Death 
on a battlefield may be in itself as ter- 
rible, but it is the death of a hero. It 
may be the death of a Christian, of a 
loyal patriot true to his native land, of a 
deVotee of a worthy cause, a martyr de- 
serving reverence and fame. These 
Americans adopted the names, including 
that accounted divine, which marked 
them as in a sense Arabs ; they made 
themselves Mohammedans in a Christian 
land; their order represented the more 
worldly and roystering element of a 
worldly clan ; they were dashed to death 
from the midst of their strengthening 
themselves in the reversion of the world's 
moral and religious progress won throueh 
faithful ages. It was a dreadful time 
for men to die who had been born in a 
Christian land ; a fearful place for dying 
men to be found. 



When Christ came to this earth men 
gave him only a stable and a manger 
cradle ; but when man goes to Christ he 
gives him a "house not made with hands 
eternal in the heavens." 



Blessed is he who in spite of the day's 
confusion, can ever hear the whisper of 
a Voice and feel the sympathetic pres- 
sure of a Hand. 



OPPORTUNITIES. 

"We hear a good deal about the world be- 
ing full of golden opportunities," said Uncle 
Nathan, "hut you take my advice, my boy, 
and don't wait too long for 'em. Pick up 
the silver ones, or even a good honest iron 
one, if it comes handy, and do your best with 
that. Yes, I know it's likely to look pretty- 
cheap and heavy. We're apt to call the iron 
one necessity in&tead of opportunity, but no- 
body knows what a necessity may turn into 
if it's bravely grappled Avith. 

"Those old fellows, the alchemists, were 
not so far out of the way in their dream of 
transmuting baser metals into gold. It's 
been done over and over and over again in 
many a life, and I tell you, my boy, the thing 
to begin with is the thing that lies at your 
hand, whether it's a duty, a chance, or only 
a hard necessity. Master it, and you will 
surely have gained something that will carry 
you farther. Most of the 'golden opportu- 
nities' don't show their gold at first, any- 
way. They're dull and tarnished, mixed with 
alloy, and the only way of making them 
shine is by a good, industrious rubbing." 

Why not notice the opportunity to 
help save this country from the influ- 
ence of the Jesuit and similar orders ? 
There is an opportunity at hand to turn 
light on Romish and Masonic supersti- 
tion. * 



If God were not just we could not 
trust Him; if He were not merciful He 
could not trust us. 



A PROFANE TRAVESTY. 

Easter celebrates in a marked manner 
that which is celebrated every Lord's 
Day, and that is the resurrection of 
Jesus. Nothing which fails to honor 
him and to hold relation to that event 
can be peculiarly appropriate, and noth- 
ing hostile to him or adapted to derro- 
gate from the significance of the event 
can be consistent with Easter or Lord's 
Day observance. Such incongruity was 
extreme in a recent case reported in a 
Boston newspaper. About thirty-five 
prominent Masons, including the mayors 
of Lynn and Cambridge, were guests of 
their brethren in a Boston lodge. If it 
is true that Masonry is founded on the 
Bible, there seems a degree of fitness in 
thus assembling. 

The place must have been already 
hallowed by associations befitting the oc- 
casion, or at least free , from opposite 
suggestions. The ''brethren" were sure- 
ly devout souls honoring the Lord and 



June, 100" 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



45 



celebrating his resurrection with the joy 
of liopefiil beHevers. It was "the same 
day at evening," the "doors being shut" 
also 'for fear of" Cowans. The visit- 
ing delegation was hrst taken to a res- 
taurant by a committee, where the Wor- 
shipful :\i aster, Moy Ding Goone, made 
an address of welcome, which Wong 
Ling translated. Among those welcomed 
were four State senators, one of whom 
acted as toastmaster by request, and that 
one the president of the ^Massachusetts 
Senate. 

Several guests having responded to 
toasts (the sentiments doubtless pecu- 
liarly fitting Easter observance), the 
guests repaired after the banquet to the 
Chinese temple, located in the quarter 
called Chinatown. Here several Ma- 
sonic degrees were exemplified. 

As in lodges not made up of those to 
whom ^Massachusetts Christians send 
missionaries, so also in this one there 
was a ban put upon Jesus' name, yet this 
was his day ; it was ostensibly a com- 
Txiemoration of his resurrection that was 
attempted, yet he who rose was strangely 
ignored ; one would have expected an 
allusion to his resurrection, yet there was 
only the Masonic raising based on a 
pagan myth fitted to a Jewish name. 
Now what happened Easter Sunday? 
Diet Chinese become Christians, or did 
A.mericans become pagans? 



EAGLES' MEMORIAL SERVICE. 

The second Sunday in May all Aeries 
of the Order of Eagles held a mem- 
orial services for Eagles who have died. 
The order is nine years old and claims 
no fictitious antiquity. There are at 
least 1,500 lodges, none of which were 
in existence earlier than 1898, and the 
membership is 300,000. It beg'an at 
Seattle, Wash., and has extended across 
the continent until it is very well known 
in eastern saloons. It may be wxll that 
on one Sunday of the year it is part of 
their insurance business to listen to solos 
like ''Lead Kindly Light," "There's a 
Beautiful Land on High," and "Face to 
Face." On other days, if what we have 
seen qualifies us to judge, the place to 
look when they are holding assemblies of 
some other kind, is around the saloons 



where Eagles are wont to alight. The 
liquor street seems to be the place to 
listen for their "\^ea ! Yea !" Of course 
they "acknowledge a Supreme God," arc 
"founded on liberty, truth, justice and 
equality," and have a wonderful member- 
ship of "national. State, county and citA 
officials, including Theodore Roosevelt." 



MAY USE EMBLEMS. 

Court Decides Negroes Have Right to 

Wear Badges of Whites. 

Negro societies may, if they desire, 
adopt and use the emblem of any secret 
organization which excludes them from 
membership, according to a decision ren- 
dered by the justices of the Xew York 
court of special sessions. 

The decision was given in the case of 
Olridge R. Johnson, a negro employed 
as a cleaner in the Ludlow street jail, 
who was arraigned on three seperate 
charges, growing out of his wearing a 
button bearing the emblem of the Order 
of Elk^. Johnson was discharged. 

The evidence produced against John- 
son went to show that the full title of 
the White Elks' society is the "Benevo- 
lent, Protective Order of Elks of the 
United States," and that the copyright 
button bore above the elk's antlers the let- 
ters "B. P. O. E." 

■ The colored society was known as the 
"Improved Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks of the World," and their 
button also bore the antlers and above 
them the letters "I. B. P. O. E. W.," only 
that the first and last letters, the "I" and 
the "W," were lost on the antlers, mak- 
ing the letters seen "B. P. O. E.," or the 
same as those on the white society's but- 
ton. 

The decision of the court was based on 
the ground that the white society's con- 
stitution contains the improper word, viz., 
"white," and they hold that the negro so- 
ciety could not practice a deception. They 
also declared that it w^as nowhere shown 
that they wdlfuUy violated any provision 
of the constitution or bylaws of the Cru- 
der of Elks. 



Some ambitions have wings and some 
have feet, but only the kind that keeps 
moving will reach the goal. 



4«; 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Jiiue. IfxJl 



MASONIC JESLITS. 

One of the Scotch Rite degrees is 
named "Trice lUustrious Order of the 
Cross." and such a name naturaUy sug- 
gests the noblest principles as well as 
distinctively Christian characteristics. It 
is a degree that is not exactly ^Masonic in 
the sense that Blue Lodge degrees are. 
Therefore, it does not need to exclude al- 
lusion to Christ. One obligation of this 
degree is given in virtually the follow- 
ing terms : 

"You further swear, that, should you 
know another to violate any essential 
point of this obligation, you will use your 
most decided endeavors, by the blessing 
of God. to bring such person to the 
strictest and most condign punishment. 
agreeably to the rules and usages of our 
ancient fraternity: and this, by point'r.g 
him out to the world as an unworthy 
vagabond, by opposing his interest, by 
deranging his business, by transferring 
his character after him wherever he may 
go. and bv exposing him to the contempt 
of the whole fraternity and of the worl 1. 
during his whole natural life."' 

Thts is meanness systematized and re- 
duced to the terms of an exact science. 
Xo man loyal to this oath, in his heart, 
is honorable. 

As usual, the oath has a penalty, whi'.h 
is the following, and we call attention ^c 
the fact that it is "founded on the Bible.'" 
in a way to classify ^lasons among tie 
mortal enemies of Jesus by voluntary 
self-classification : 

"To all and every part thereof we then 
bind you. and by ancient usage you bind 
vourseif, under the no less infamous pen- 
altv than dying the death of a trai^'^r 
bv' having a spear or other sharp instru- 
ment, like our Divine blaster, thrust into 
your left side, bearing testimony even in 
death to the power and justice of "bt 
mark of the Holy Cross."" 

Of course, every man who likes to take 
and keep or enforce such obligations is 
an evil-minded scoundrel about whom it 
iS not necessary to raise questions, s.. 
obviouslv is he a natural enemy of hu- 
mankind. The chief characteristic of the 
whole is baseness with ferocity: there ib 
nothing honorable or, in any decent -ense. 
human. As to the penalty, the only ex- 
cuse for it is that it applies only to tbo-e 



who. having taken such an obligation, 
have excluded themselves from the race 
of Imman beings, so that to take tneir 
lives is not murder. 



VATICAN AND LODGE. 

The Roman Catholics of the United 
States are disturbed by the element in 
their own membership which enters into 
American secret organizations. This dis- 
turbance seems to increase rather than 
subside imder the intiuence of custom, 
or at least to m.ake its protest more in- 
sistent. In a late conference held at the 
national capital by American archbishops, 
this trouble was considered. It takes two 
forms though they are essentiallv one. 
For Catholics do not contine themselves 
to Romish organizations like the Knights 
of Columbus, but tend to become rather 
promiscuous joiners, while societies that 
are really Roman in character and airri, 
are accused of admitting members of too 
diversified nationality or non-Catholic in 
character. 

Telegrams have been received at tlie 
A'atican relating to the treatment of the 
question by the Archbishops, and it is 
understood at Rome. that, instead of an- 
svrering queries sent from Rome, the 
Archbishops referred them to ^Igr.' Ta!- 
conio. apostolic delegate to the United 
States, yet at the same time gave it as 
their opinion, that the corporate existence 
of some societies being distinctly "limit- 
ed, their condemnation would be impoli- 
tic, since it would give them a new lea-e 
of life, just as putting books upon the 
forbidden list surely pron:otes sales. 

]^Iessages from A\*ashington to the 
A'atican also report that the apostolic 
delegate to the United States, to whom 
these matters have been said to be re- 
ferred, has decided that Catholics who 
have been paying money to American hi- 
-r.rance orders for several years need 
not forfeit their insurance but may keep 
up the dues. They may not. however, 
march in parades, nor may they accord- 
ing to the methods of such secret socie- 
lie- be buried. The permission appears 
to apply to the case of those *svho have 
m.aintained membership for several years 
until payments have accumulated. 

The objection is not to secret orders 
a- such, but to affiliation, which is n ^t 



cii 1 : i ^ r i A N L" Y > 'J < u R E . 






prosperitv* of : - ^ 

2 question, but i: ^cci: - i^.. : ^^ r.:.: 

small. Besides, this may give them 

chance to pose as distinctively - i: 

and mysteriously potent in : r 

American institutions. - r 

some members to cttse: : .- 

Romanists themselves it i- / : 

the effect of intensify:"- : t- 

which Rome is gla ^ : : 

s- : " . ~ America vicl ' - : 



?!ie -: 



are. as i:>: 



CAM OR R A. 



-A-. it 



agai- -- : - -5 mat ear.y 

1^ : r _ vr two men 

-" - holding 

.- :. ..;:r. ^:_ :::i: ^; ._ ^:: .:tpted to 
ise he was shot. Their method of 
breaking in was discovered, and it wa^ 
found that they had ransacked e^-=^r}- 
drawer Se. Of course, all 

w'^F do:. : .^t of C>ur Xoble Or- 

'■j'. cevite-:: t:- iruth. Charir.-. and so 
on. 



. - c a . 



A dangerols pin point. 

-"' ^ : ~ rr c^..ei 1 oung 

^'-^ : - - y the American 

; ■-< - Societ}- and distrib- 

^:- - - --_ -^-:-^-_ in schools of many 
states :f t::r Viti'in. It is a matter of 
regret t : -.:: i in S't' gc-^d a paper with 
sucin a :ir :./.:.:: :.n. an advertisement, ap- 
parently lur: :-..- i in electrotype, which 
rebates part.y :: :.ass pms. but includes 
those t:r lieges. While the word lodge 
occtirs ' ••: -:^e. it is rather prominent. 
and tltr : . _ .::i:n :f ledges thus given 
in^such a paper is liable to have a bad 
eliect. At .east :ne gi-od story in the 
same rarer has been ntarrei bv its lodee 



'-^f^-^h 



erciiants its rre" 



tne a^sas 
urkss he 



A C-C 

vears 



be at a r 



ic^LCi. 4\ :. - V - 

Ccivec se'. v" -. : -f 
the sa:. -r --:-: :. 
tl'.ere wa- t-:- cc : 
failed to pav S2,c-: 
h " b^ killel 

si : ^elf in his 
w?th trunks ar. 1 : 



: : : ret society " t 

; r -rerius Italian 

just as he was abjiit 

■:i:v-nr=s. he drew 

: . ■/ r .rtters irtnt 

" "m ""/.-.- . him tiirit 

■ :.- .rmanded he 

le gave these leuers 






SIX 



kext xcw 0.0.'/ E: ne rc- 
rs. On Satv.riav ci 



r: nents. 
s-DFts of fumir.i.e 



tavir :i tiie ureeK Letter College Icnige. 
After its serial pnblicati c-n the b-ji-k was 
advertise! in the same paper. Snrely. a 
paper f:r Sunday schc-;l circulation 
ought to be kept clean of everything that 
carries a flavor cr odor of what is irre- 
ligious or immoral in nature or ten lencv. 



WEBSTER'S DICTIONARY. 

'. • c ::'' ^uvntiin to the aivemisement 
in this n. u vr :f Webster's Internation- 
al Dirtir.ary. _ne Lynosure commends 
the nev" .'> ebster's _nternat:ona; as all 
titat one neecs m tne '.vav C't a -.ctiinarv 
t:r t'v: ..v^ehril It is to b-r especiaily 
c num.- ^A .;r readers -"v^- the 

i Dicriv^fiiar}-. published by Funk 



*L<±ii_t'atir«A 



ciia 



\.-h .'r^ 



which, m spite 01 protesrs 
t>~ the pui>:is!''ers. continues to commend 
Freeman -- ""- ^-inting in connection 
with its : freemason." a cut 

of ^^ ashu;gt: n m Masonic regalia, not- 
with Stan dins' he oracticallv abandoned 
the rhr :h 



years before his death. 



4S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1907. 



NATIONAL i 

June 13th 

WHEATC 



tlfjursbay IlTorning Session 

Pres. C. a. Blanchard, Chairman. ". ' ' ," 
. DEVOTIONAL SERVICES— Mr. A. J. Millard, Little Rock, Ark. 
BUSINESS — Reading of Minutes of Last Session ; Annual Reports 
OF Officers; Appointment of Committees/ etc. 

d)urs5ay Afternoon Session 

Rev. Samuel H. Swartz, Seneca, 111., Chairman. 
PRAYER— Rev. H. H. HiNMAN, Oberlin, Ohio. • 
■ MUSIC— ORGAN SOLO— Miss Rose Harriet Field. 

SHORT ADDRESSES— Rev. J. P. Stoddard, Boston; Rev. H. H. Hin- 

MAN, Oberlin, Ohio ; Rev. G. A. Pegram, Michigan State Agent ; Mr. 

A. J. Millard, Little Rock, Ark. ; Mr. R. A. Cullor, Lemonville, 

Mo. ; Mrs. Amanda Smith, Harvey 111. ; and others. 

Cl^ursbay (Evening Session 

Rev. E. B. Stewart, Chicago, Chairman. 

DEVOTIONAL SERVICES— Rev. James P. Stoddard. 

MUSIC— Mrs. H. K. Boyer, Leader. 

ADDRESS— "THE RELIGIOUS FEATURES OF A SECRET SO- 
CIETY"— Rev. H. A. Day, Pastor Wesleyan Church, Grand Rapids, 
Mich. . 

MUSIC. ' •■ 

ADDRESS— 'WHAT SHOULD BE THE POSITION OF A MINIS- 
TER TOWARD THE LODGE?"— Rev. B. E. Bergesen, Pastor 
Lutheran Church, Chicago. 



June, 1907. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 49 



INVENTION 

14th, 1Q07 



^ribay Zllorning Session 



Pres. C. a. Blanch ard, Chairnian. 

PRAYER. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ; ELECTION OF OFFICERS ; READ- 
ING OF LETTERS FROM ABSENT MEMBERS; UNFIN- 
ISHED BUSINESS. 

OPEN PARLIAMENT— GENERAL TOPIC: '•NEEDED WORK AND 
HOW TO ACCOMPLISH IT' —Rev. W. O. Dinius, Leader. 

^rtbay Afternoon Session 

Rev. J. Groen, Grand Rapids, Mich., Chaiiinan. 

DEVOTIONS— Rev. G. A. Pegram, Elkton, Mich. 

MUSIC — Mrs. A. E. Bartholomew,' Lf^ac/^r. 

ADDRESS— "WHY I LEFX THE LODGE"— Mr. Juliu.s Haavind, Chi- 
cago. 

MUSIC. 

ADDRESS— "DELUSIVE TEACHING IN PRESENT-DAY PREACH- 
ING" — Rev. Willlam Evans, D. D., Wheaton, lUinois. 

;$ribay (£r>ening Session 

Pres. C. A. Blanchard, Chairman. 

PRAYER— Rev. J. L. Cheney, D. D., Wheaton, 111. 

MUSIC — Miss Virginia Graham, Leader. 

ADDRESS— "CHRISTIAN SCIENCE"— Rev. A. C Dixox. D. D., Chi- 
cago. 



50 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUKK. 



Jiiue. 19(y, 



THE ANCIENT DEGREE OF O. Al. 

Among adoptive degrees there is one 
that has never gro\vn ver}' popular with 
relatives of lodge men, though in one 
way or other it manages to keep up a 
permanent membership, and one of cred- 
itable quality. The question is capable of 
being asked whether membership in 
some other does not sometimes tend to 
pave the way into this one less sought 
for its own solitary attractions. 

Such a case might without improba- 
bilitv be supposed when a young lady 
of eligible relationship has been a mem- 
ber of the Eastern star, until a possible 
suitor for her hand appears on the scene. 
He has already known a good deal about 
members of the local lodge. He has been 
shocked to learn that some of them are 
frequenters of the Eastern Star because 
admissible there on account of being also 
]^Jasons. of vx-hich male Eastern Star 
guests are made. Another shock comes 
and a sharper one which shakes his re- 
spect for this woman, when he is startled 
by the information that she is in that 
very lodge with those men and the class 
of women he has long thought of with 
disgust as being there with such men in 
secret relations and under mutual vows. 
He is chilled and repelled, while the 
thought of having a wife who holds re- 
lations of a secret and sworn t}'pe with 
men with whom he himself will not as- 
sociate, turns the picture to the wall. So 
far is he is concerned, the girl be'comes a 
candidate for the O. ^I. degree, older 
far than Freemasonry, the Free and An- 
cient degree of Old ^laid. Far worse 
things might happen, and there are far 
worse members of secret orders than 
these whose first initiation is here sug- 
gested as qualifying them for the sec- 
end but we offer the suggestion for the 
thoughtful consideration of maidens con- 
siderino: one degree without reflecting, 
heretofore, that the decision for one may 
involve two, vrhether they count degrees 
or persons. 



To despise the grace of God is to for- 
feit His mercy. "Xone of those men 
v.hich were bidden shall taste of my 
supper."" It is a solemn thing to turn 
away from the grace of the Son of God. 



TAMMUZ. 

Some of our readers may have been 
assured that Freemasonry assists its de- 
votees to understand portions of Scrip- 
ture hidden from the interpretative eyes 
of the "profane." like mere iminitiated 
doctors of divinity and professors of 
theology. One passage on which ^las- 
onry throws light, and which in turn 
also throws light on ^Masonry, includes 
the thirteenth and sixteenth verses of the 
eighth chapter of Ezekiel. The whole 
chapter is a complete and coherent 
passage, of which the four verses are 
a homogeneous portion. Attention is 
called to the connecting phrase, "greater 
abominations."" "He said also unto me, 
'Turn thee yet again, and thou shalt see 
greater abominations that they do." 
Then he brought me to the door of the 
gate of the Lord's house which was to- 
ward the north : and behold, there sat 
women weeping for Tammuz. Then 
said he unto me. 'Hast thou seen this, 
O son of man? turn thee yet again, and 
thou shalt see greater abominations than 
these." And he brought me into the 
inner court of the Lord's house, and be- 
hold, at the door of the "temple of the 
Lord, between the porch and the altar, 
were about Ave and twenty men. with 
their backs toward the temple of the 
Lord, and their faces toward the east; 
and they worshiped the sun toward the 
east."" 

The special cult of Freemasonry being 
sun-worship, nothing is more obvious 
than the connection, and nothing easier 
than resulting interpretation. To those 
conversant with the cult the connection 
between worshiping the sun and weep- 
ing for Tammuz is so simple that a 
sufficient link is found in juxtaposition. 
Sun-worship vrith its inseparable phase 
of phallism is at the heart of Free- 
masonry as a key to the interpretation 
of this passage. 

As Zeus of the Greeks was Jupiter of 
the Romans, so Tammuz of Asia has 
been accounted Adonis of Europe. Re- 
ferring to this passage when marshall- 
ing the fallen angels. }^Iilton thus uses 
both names, applying one of them, as it 
was also used, doubtless, for the reason 
to which he alludes, in naming a stream, 



June. 19»~ 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURF 



which, rising in ^It. Lebanon, emptied 

into the Mediterra:r :■.: :' r 

coast. 

"Thanminz came next behind, 
Wiiose annoal wonnd in Lebanon alloreii 
The Syrian damsels lo lament his fate 
In amorous ditties all a summers day: 
While smooth Adonis fP3m his native rock 
Ran purple to the sea. supposed v -'. : . ! 
Of Tbammuz yearly wounded : the 
Inferted Sion's .! . ^ : : 



wno ormsj^s 


to tne 


stiidv oi his :rier 






_T OI su: 


•: _ 




- '- - ' • _-. 


1 r _ . - 




....'. ..',,'. . '. . '..\ - 


5Ub"r : 


-r. 


masii-ucn as. wni.e 


= : ." V : ^ - 




- . .^_ : 1 know 
special 


. "" — 


" ■ r _ . _ : 


^ - - :^v-lglOU5 



Wb«>se vranton : ~ 
Elzekiel saw. wL- 
His eye surrey 'd 
ared .Ju«lah. 

The " -V - : 
title ar ; r 

sonnets, tiie 
Phoenicia beir^ 
A'enus. and if .v 
identical. 



•^r"??! 



: : ; :.v. r : : : _ -"ris as a 

matter of objective knowledge, like o:h- 

:-: ' •■ :^-.-: ' ^. pts. lives in and has an 

^- : : Like the ancient breth- 

r s to the east and ven- 

^- - : ^ He g-:»es the round of 

: uts high value on 

V : /.e temple in. which 

: : r . r. He d'>es not merely 

Sec : -'. he can an :: 

his. : savr." the ±tr 



Lit'--' ^, 



year." Jerome 
and fifth cenr/.nes 
Bible into La::::. ::: 
:ee::::: verse of this 

Ezekie'.. savs tha: s'n 
Gen::ie fable 7:. : v 



consciousnes: 



.:s ue:n^ 
con luc 
retc I. 



REALLY : 

\ ■.vr::ing on "A Oues- 
rcs" in the Masonic 






. ^ ..r^rcL- 



niversar\ 


soie; 


ntentec ""^ 


■•• -'-e 


•.van : 




w:::: s 


~. ~ 


severa. 


:/----: 



v:ew 



to tne iu:: : _ : ' 
east. Thi- 
made rr : : : 

gan an_ ans:^:^ cv. 
ciirSiDrs and t\-pes of 
Stars. 



.: .\- :^ .a- :::a^:::ry i^ :-- :- -■ r7.:^::.:s :r semi- 
: :' :ra:el :es: I'f time." Which is it. religious or 

. :.:a: :::::e i. :. iri-iti oeiore tne rLCi*;-!. Di-ubt- 

: 7r.:sa- ir-- [\- : ;: 7:? Xoah was a Mason. 

:' _ ':.- says s::::ething ab-3ut 

:::-7:^ :h:s I :':-:. _7:::. '..z :a:is : ::." him brother. 

: V :':rr n: 5ee:::s :: ieave '-;::■. :-. f'ssible sug- 

:^":;~ ::: gest:::: : ';;- ' ■ ^ •::it:ate. 

: ' ::- Or.- : . ' n - g were 

.:rr : V r'.earer. ::: :i:e foliowmg quoiarion. where 

::*v . - ^ays: 'These ^::avr ^een -^reserved 

heir intern: :h- _h : h :he ages 

: : r ' :• T existei. Dies this mean. 

: Ti " :.:e informarion. that the 

sisters, ca- ^ ^^. t«3gether with the three 

•vere pre- .._.. .:..rs of '- ' •':ecture. Doric, 

:. Eastern Ionic and Corin: e existed from 

:imcs. :r i:es he refer onlv 



It is true, therefore, that a rree:nas«3n 



wav to alleeorv and s\Tn- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1901 



bols? Probably the latter, though this 
is what he says, under the seventh head- 
ing of the general subject Landmarks: 

"Hieroglypliies. 

"Anotlier point that would be appropriate 
at this time would be the Hieroglyphics and 
the three pri.uitive orders of architecture — 
Doric. Ionic and Corinthian, u&ually denom- 
inated and meaning Wisdom, Strength and 
Beauty. From that followed the terse de- 
scription of the Fraternity itself as heing a 
beautiful system of morality Tieled in alle- 
gory and illustrated symbols. 

"These ha^'e been preserved in their in- 
tegrity, throtighout all the ages that we have 
existed.*" 

Are we to include the claim of ante- 
diluvian existence within the mass of 
veiled allegory? Are the symbols what 
make the ]\Iasonic moral system, beau- 
tiful? And, if so, what is the symbol 
that limits Alasonic chastity to very 
near relatives of ^lasons of the third 
degree? Has this beautiful item of se- 
cret and limited morality been preserved 
from the time the flood swept the an- 
cient brethren ofi' the earth, and kept in 
its ''integrity throughout all the ages"? 
Certainly all there is of this beautiful 
morality admits of "terse description." 



HARDLY DAMON. 

A convention of the Uniform P,ank of 
the Knights of Pythias opened at Boston, 
Mass., April 23, and had its headqtiar- 
ters at Hotel Westminster, in the Back 
Bav Cjuarter of the city, where are to be 
found, with elegant residences, some of 
the most important as well as finest public 
buildings. Here is located the famous 
^Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
and when some of the students out for 
lunch found a line of horses in front oi 
the hotel, their curiosity and interest led 
to an inspection of the steeds, with com- 
ments on their qualities. The first plum- 
ed knight came out about the time of 
the noon-hour rush from the engineering 
building. At first some believed that there 
was a gathering of some branch of the 
Volunteer State Militia, because the 
knights wore ''Mass." on their collars ; 
but when it was announced that the men 
in uniform were Knights of Pythias, the 
comical aspect seemed to impress the 
students, who began to hoot. From ona 



o'clock till half past three, the boys hunt- 
ed the feathered bipeds and in various 
ways perplexed the Pythian mind with 
the burning question, ''Is life worth liv- 
ing?" Mysteriously, large sheets of paper 
adorned a horse's tail, to the great im- 
pairment of the knighth' dignity of the 
rider. No knight dared dismount to re- 
move the irregular plumage thus added. 
One, however, turned cowboy to the ex- 
tent of picking up while mounted ; which, 
after all, does not read as so great a 
feat, since there are two ends to a horse's 
tail. To some of the knights, mounting 
a horse was a matter of some difficultv, 
and the young tormentors were not dull 
to appreciate this feature of what they 
helped to make an interesting situation. 
Each gallant knight as he mounted was 
honored with a demonstrative ovation ; 
and when a gold-braided ofiicer came out 
and began to give orders, the student 
echo was at least audible. The color- 
bearer was so indiscreet as to talk to some 
girls on the curbstone, and forthwith the 
attention he received was still young but 
not all feminine. 

In the early afternoon, the instructors 
had troubles of their own. It was more, 
fun to watch the rumpus than draw de- 
signs or do laboratory work ; and, besides, 
it was not every day that one could see 
human beings of the male sex wearing 
feathers and ribbons. The Tech windows 
were closed and word was issued to at- 
tend to work: then out from the engi- 
neering laboratories came men in shirt 
sleeves, and from the design rooms came 
others with pencils over their ears, run- 
aways from school full of mischief to the 
brim. 

When at last the knights succeeded in 
starting their parade, about 100 students 
fell in behind them, a corps of voluntary 
esquires who would not suffer the car- 
riages to fall in without this break in the 
pompus line. They cheered, and gratui- 
tously added other noises, as they fol- 
lowed along the route, which was chang- 
ed so that their fellow students could not 
review the troops as they passed one of 
the buildings. Those in line, however, 
assisted to promote the liveliness of the 
occasion, and augment the knightly 
parade. . 



June. llXt' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



EMBODIMENT OF ALL TRUTH. 

"We cannot, it is true, open heaven 
to the upturned eyes, straining to catch 
a gUmpse of the source of truth,, or lead 
man to a veritable stream of life, in its 
crvstal beauty and delighted melody, 
flowing from the throne of God, and 
laughing through the flowers and 
meadows and hills of earth. But we 
can reflect heaven in our lives and sym- 
pathies, and by living our belief in the 
universal brotherhood of man, can cover 
the clouds with light, inferentially dem- 
onstrate the fatherhood of God, and 
thus tune the ear to catch the laughter 
and the eye to fancy that it could see 
the rippling of the stream of life. Uni- 
versal }vIasonry, would make universal 
peace, universal contentment of soul, a 
universal belief in God. and a universal 
anticipation of eternal life. Masonry is 
the embodiment of all truth." 
— E. F. Lamb, in Masonic Voice-Review. 

All truth includes the truth as it is 
in Jesus. Universal anticipation of eter- 
nal life could not. in the nature of things, 
be the outcome of Universal IVIasonry ; 
in fact there could be no such thing 
as Universal }^Iasonry, for no woman 
and far from all men are eligible. AMiile 
not universal, can ]\Iasonry show such 
an actual record as far as it has gone? 



TESTLMONY OF ADHERLNQ MASONS. 

Xot all adhering ]\Iasons will refuse 
to admit that ^lasonry has really been 
exposed, or even to indicate some partic- 
ular exposure that can be relied on. Tlie 
writer could cite repeated instance ^^ in 
his own experience, but will only men- 
tion that the first book of the kind he 
ever owned was one of which he did not 
know until its title was given by a Free- 
mason who had seen it used in the lodge 
room when an officer was unfamiliar w ith 
his part. Such an instance may be taken 
as an example of one kind of private 
testimony to the exposures of Freema- 
sonry. 

An example of public exposure is fur- 
nished by an incident in the history of 
the State of Rliode Island. Already un- 
counted ^lasons had renounced Masonry, 
and regarding it as no longer secret made 
little scruple of admitting that it had 



been exposed, when the Legislature of 
that State appointed a committee to make 
an investigation. This committee was 
empowered to put witnesses under oath 
so that false testimony involved peril 
of penalty for perjury. Regular Masons 
who had not abandoned Masonry, but 
still clung to the order were called. 
Knowing that perjury was under the cir- 
cumstances impracticable, because it 
could not be hidden when multitudes 
would tell the truth, these told the truth 
under compulsion, being under oath and 
penalty. ■ These witnesses had taken ten 
degrees. These revelations are part of 
the records of the State of Rhode Is- 
land. They are based, not on the charges 
of outsiders, nor on the allegations of 
seceded ^lasons, but on the reluctant ad- 
missions of adhering IMasons from .vhom 
they were drawn exactly as testim.ony is 
forcibly wrested from unwilling wit- 
nesses who tell the truth on their peril 
in court. It is testimony of ordinary 
adhering ^lasons. 



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54 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, IJXH. 



HIGH SCHOOL BRAND. 

The high school brand of "frat" goods 
— or bads — is rapidly working itself out 
of the market. A Boston newspaper of 
]^Iav 1 8. refers to it in a short editorial 
paragraph, saying : 

'•Tbe Melrose authorities have long been 
fighting the secret society nonsense in the 
town's high school, and now this branding of 
an initiate comes as a last straw. The chil- 
dren's -fraternities' should go." 

]^Ielrose is in the yicinity of Boston, 
where the codfish odor of "fraternity," 
caught and cured by patented processes, 
is doubtless natural. Intense indignation, 
howeyer. stirred all ^lelrose when three 
boys were cruelly and fraternally brand- 
ed' The parents threatened that if the 
scars proyed to be permanent, prosecu- 
tion would follow. The school superin- 
tendent said that if such treatment were 
giyen his own boy, he would see to it 
tl^a^ the guilty parties ^yere punished. 
The chairman of the school committee 
denounced the act as an outrage. He 
declared himself in fayor of abohshino- 
all secret societies in the high school. 
Eyery niember of the committee con- 
demned the cruelty perpetrated by the 
Delta Phi, and in this the entire faculty 
ioined. When the chief of police was 
told of it, he said that the boys who 
would do such a thing ought to be -s^nt 
to iail. 

There is plenty of trouble for all con- 
cerned, including parents on both sides. 
And it all grows out of that hotbed of 
mischief. The Secret System. 

The initiation took place in Wyoming 
Cemetery, between ten and twelye o'clock 
at night^-or, ^Masonically speaking, some- 
^vhere toward Low Twelye. Three boys 
were initiated into Our Xoble Order, 
about twenty-fiye members being pres- 
ent. Among the yarious ceremonies was 
that of rolling the three ambitious can- 
didates down hill in a barrel. The Delta 
Phi. or, in other words, the licensed gang 
of hazers, formed a circle about the three 
boys whose cheeks were to be marked. 
Then with a solution of nitrate of silyer 
a triangle \yas drawn on the right cheek 
of each boy, and a circle with a line 
drawn through it on the left cheek of 
each of the three. As these would form 
the Greek letters Delta Phi, the smooth. 



boyish faces were probably scarred with 
these initials of the secret society. The 
marks were about two inches in diameter. 

Two of the boys were blindfolded ; 
the other was held by the arms. At the 
tmie there was no pain, so our report 
says, but the next day the sufferins^s of 
the boys were yery great and they were 
treated at the hospital. 

Another report locates the initiation in 
Pine Banks Park, and states that before 
the branding the boys had been torment- 
ed to exhaustion, in eyery conceiyable 
manner, and it is after all alleged that 
they realized what was being done 
enough not to dare struggle lest their 
eyes should be injured. 

Although deplored, this help is almost 
welcomed, as it aids the committee in 
bringing to an approyed conclusion its 
already progressing -attempt to abolish 
the ''frat" nuisance as *'in eyery way 
detrimental to the interests of the school." 
The chairman says r "If ]\Ielrose has any 
sanity, there will certainly be no objec- 
tions raised by those who haye hereto- 
fore championed the secret society." 



OBLIVIOUS VICTIMS. 

The boy ^\■ho closed his school com- 
position on pins with an attempt to hit 
the nail — or pin — on the head, made an 
interesting point by remarking, "Pins 
haye sayed a great many liyes — by not 
swallowing them." There are one or 
two things in the last issue of the Cyno- 
sure that so expose secret society ob- 
liyiousness as to tempt one to borrow the 
boy's form of statement . and say, Ma- 
sonry has -sayed a great many men from 
its worst effects — by their not under- 
standing it. 

One instance is found on page 3, in 
the letter from Toledo. This one in- 
yolyes the Alasonic principle as it reap- 
pears in the }Jaccabees. It so happened 
that ^Ir. Brenner, who was at once call- 
ed ignorant when he showed his knowl- 
edge, w^as able to teach these people what 
they had not noticed. The \yay in which 
the teaching was receiyed was itself a 
further yindication of the innocency of 
intention hitherto characterizing the 
president who had failed to understand 
one of the salient principles of her own 



June, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



society. The ladies did not know that 
the name of Jesus was purposely ruled 
out of their lodge prayers : thousands of 
other lodge members have probably 
never thought about such a thing. Their 
first search gave them a surprise, and 
they were not yet satisfied that this was 
so ; other books, they were sure, would 
prove the objector wrong. Admitting all 
that may be alleged of the untrustworthi- 
ness of what Masons say about Masonry, 
we think it probable that a very large 
fraction of Christian lodge membership 
is, in the same way, unconscious of this 
rule of lodges, and, if questioned, would 
answer somewhat as these people did, 
yet with perfect honesty. 

Another instance appears in President 
Blanchard's letter on page 9. It is the 
story of the young man on the train, 
who, doubtless, meant to speak with a 
good degree of sincerity when he told 
Dr. Blanchard that "nobody caii be a 
Mason who is not a Christian." Of 
course, the statement is to the last de- 
gree absurd and is constantly contradict- 
ed by ordinary facts. Likely enough, the 
young man had a hazy idea of what it 
w^as to be a Christian. Very likely also 
he was not fully aware as yet what it 
was to be a ]\Iason. 

Both those letters in the ]\Iay number 
furnish food for thought, not only for 
those who do not understand lodge prin- 
ciples exposed in them, but also for 
those who do understand, and , assume 
that lodge members also understand, the 
principles of lodgery. Imagining this, 
one is perplexed by the conduct of some 
members of lodges, who, as Christians, 
have seemed to profess better things. 

Loyalty to our Lord is, of course, in- 
compatible with loyalty to his enemies, 
when these are recognized as his foes. 
There may be some excuse in failure of 
recognition. How can it fail in some 
cases is still a mystery, but great blind- 
ness and stupidity seem possible to in- 
telligent as well as stupid men. The in- 
fluence of lodge cant and sing-song must 
be reckoned. If pins save lives "by not 
swallowing them," let us hope that 
lodges save character by not understand- 
ing them. However absurd the phrase- 
ology, there may be validity in the fact. 



A PERMANENT HIATUS. 

Under the plea of inoommunicableness 
something vital is omitted from every 
]\Iasonic claim, and likewise from every 
invitation to membership and assurance 
given any prospective candidate. Great 
assumptions are made on behalf of the 
institution, but in such general tern is 
that an inquirer is left dependent on the 
judgment of another and provided with 
little from which to form an opinion of 
his own. One or two particulars mav be 
stated vaguely, but there is always a 
hiatus so obvious and so sensibly real- 
ized that nothing but a plea of compelled 
secrecy makes it tolerable, not to say 
courteous and respectful. 

Using such a method no drummer 
could sell the smallest bill of goods. A 
merchant would resent the attempt as an 
insult. Kindred frauds are often per- 
petrated in various kinds of business 
transactions, but not by means of blunt 
refusal to make statements called for. 
Answers may be false but are not re- 
fused. If they were, the trade would at 
once be oil. Statements may be incom- 
plete, but they are not avowedly so. Yet 
]\Iasonry demands that far weightier 
transactions be undertaken on va^ue as- 
surances suspiciously incomplete. Busi- 
ness methods are openly abandoned, so- 
cial customs give place to one not ap- 
proved among men in general, and men 
consciously consent to abdicate the exer- 
cise of their own judgment. 

This renunciation of custom, precedent 
and rule, this abnegation of self govern- 
ment, might seem less intolerable if noth- 
ing of serious importance were involved. 
But that is no trifle which needs to be 
sworn ; it is not a light matter to make 
life long pledges ; the very assurances 
and claims that have attracted the can- 
didate magnify the undertaking ; vet he 
abandons himself, more blindly than he 
would trade a horse. 



\\'e have received a copy of the very 
able sermon of Rev. Harvey E. Simon, 
of Ashland, Ohio, on "Secret Societies 
and the Church." which was delivered 
before his congregation the early part 
of this year. A\'e hope to favor our 
readers with a large portion of it as soon 
as possible. 



oG 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June. 1901 



mm of @ur Porg. 



Kcv. James P. Stoddard, correspond- 
ing secretary and general agent of the 
Xew England Christian Association, 
writes in a recent letter : 

"I read the Cynosure with much satis- 
faction and interest, noting, as it seems 
to me, a constant advance toward an 
ideal magazine in its line. 

"My last trip was to Auburn and 
L.ewiston, Maine, where I employed two 
lads and put out about 4,00^0 tracts. The 
Elaine ]\I. E. Conference was in session 
at Auburn at the time, and while, of 
course, I did not get the platform to 
speak there, I met wdth no opposition in 
tract and personal work among the min- 
isters. The same was true at the Mas- 
sacliusetts Conference, which met in 
Lvnn the week before. I met a number 
of friends in both conferences, and when 
I approached Bishop Warren he extend- 
ed his hand, referred to our meeting in 
New Orleans several years ago, and ask- 
ed, 'Are you still in the same work?' 
When I assured him that I was he re- 
plied, There is certainly need enough of 
it,' and followed this remark with a few 
words complimentary to any man who 
dared to stand for his convictions against 
great odds." 



image, but to be separate and to walk 
with God, enjoying the sweet peace that, 
like a mighty river, is running through 
mv soul." 



One of the godly workers in our field 
is Mr. A. D. Cline of Kentucky. We 
hope soon to publish his testimony as to 
why he is a seceder. Under date of May 
13 he whites: 

"The devil is stirred here, and we are 
expecting great victory through the 
name of Jesus. Oh! it is fearful to 
think of people, and especially ministers, 
who are openly speaking falsely against 
what we know to be the truth ; but God 
can w^ork and none can hinder, and we 
find people that are waking up and 
opening their eyes to see this great evil, 
and we find one here and there that says 
he has quit his lodge. Well, God's chil- 
dren are still praying and looking up, 
expecting victory, and as for me, I have 
purposed in my heart not to defile my- 
self and not to bow down to the great 



^Ir. S. A. Chase, now of New Jer- 
sey, writes of the need of Christian testi- 
mony in that State : 

"The last Sunday in April, I believe 
it was, was Oddfellows' day, and many 
of the churches in Camden and Phila- 
delphia had special services for them, 
the members, of course, sitting in body 
of house. The lodge seems stronger 
with the chtarch here than in your sec- 
tion of the country.. The ministers don't 
realize, don't comprehend, or are gross- 
ly lacking in courage. In my occasional 
'buzzmg' Masons for their lodge connec- 
tions, silence and avoidance is almost the 
universal tactic as soon as they find out 
I know anything about the order. Of 
course, they can't argue with any fair- 
ness. This, of course, is a partial admis- 
sion that they are in the wrong, for no 
man wdll fail to defend himself when he 
is in the right." 



PENNSYLVANIA QONVENTION. 

The State secretary. Elder G. N. Fal- 
kenstein, forwarded tlie minutes of the 
Pennsylvania Association, which were 
received as due. They were in unusual- 
ly fine shape. Unfortunately, they were 
overlooked in making up the last number 
of the Cynosure. We can only give ex- 
tracts herein, as follows : 
State Officers. 

President — Rev. A. D. Zahniser, Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

Vice President — Rev. Wm. M. Howe, 
Johnstown, Pa. 

Secretarv — Rev. R. H. Martin, Beaver 
Falls. 

Treasurer — H. C. Cassel, Philadel- 
phia. 

Finances. 

The finance committee reported the 
total receipts to have been $65.85 ; the 
total expenses, $52.95 ; balance in treas- 
urv. $12.90. 

State Work. 

"The committee on State work re- 
ports that the anti-secrecy work has been 
pushed during the year in this State, 
with encouraging results, and recom- 



June, UK) 7. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



mends that the new State officers con- 
stitute a committee with power to em- 
ploy persons to dehver anti-secrecy lec- 
tures from time to time in answer to 
calls, and for such services the lecturer 
shall receive three dollars and traveling 
expenses." 

The following resolution, adopted by 
the convention, is amusing as well as in- 
teresting : 

"Resolved, That we are somewhat 
concerned, and have our sense of curi- 
osity aroused, by the bill recently intro- 
duced in the Legislature of Pennsylvania 
by Representative Decker, of Lehigh, to 
protect secret organizations from being 
exposed by those who are designated as 
charlatans, and prevent the sale of reve- 
lations of their inner workings. We here- 
by apprize all who are concerned in the 
bill that we can afford to pay the $500 
fine, and serve a term of one year in 
prison, if the several lodges which we 
are exposing will admit the truth of the 
valid exposes extant. By such proof lliey 
will greatly contribute to the advance- 
ment of the very cause which we repre- 
sent and in which we are engaged.'' 



i\lrs. S. E. Bailey, of Dermott, Ark., 
writes under date of April 2'] last, of 
furnishing a lady with some of our 
tracts. The lady was accustomed to 
hand them out to those who stopped to 
water their horses near her hou.s^. She 
gave one to a Baptist minister, who read 
the tract and made a' little fun of it, but 
some time after came back and told the 
lady that he had read and re-read the 
tract which she gave him, and was con- 
vinced that the lodge was not the place 
for God's ministers, and told her that he 
had severed his connection with all se- 
cret orders and that he wished to thank 
her for giving him the tract. 



This item of news from the Washing- 
ton {D. C.) Times of May 6 is given be- 
cause of the fact that the deceased was 
both an Elk and a Catholic : 

"J. D. Burns, a member of the Elks, 
is dead, and his funeral will be held from 
St. Martin's Catholic Church to-morrow 
morning at 10 o'clock, Reverend Father 
Hannan conducting the services." 



W. B. STODDARD'S LETTER. 

National Hotel, Buft'alo, X. Y., 

May 16, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure — I report a little early 
this month, as the comin - da}s are to 
be especiall)- busy. It was six years ago 
that I held meetings with Mennonite 
friends at Bluffton, Ohio. Since then 
many things have happened. Students in 
the college were glad to hear what I had 
to say. New churches in Bluffton and 
at Pandora (near by) gave me a large 
hearing, and contributed to the cause. I 
gave six addresses to receptive audiences. 
Pastors Lichti and Hege gave special 
help in arranging meetings. I hope to 
accept the invitation to come again in 
the near future. 

I am always glad to visit Berne, In- 
diana. There are many friends at this 
place who welcome the Cynosure and re- 
joice in the work. A pastor of this place 
related an interesting experience in our 
line. At a former charge he accepted an 
invitation to preach to the Knights of 
Pythias. He took for his subject, "Friend- 
ship." After referring to friendshin in 
general and the claims of the lodge in 
this direction, he said: 'T now wish to 
introduce you to my Friend. My Friend 
says, 'Love your enemies, do good to 
them that hate you.' '' In short, he held 
up Christ and Christianity. This very 
naturally made the lodgemen angry. They 
of course expected he would, as some 
time-servers do, hold up the lodge as 
having great teaching. 

At Fort Wayne, Indiana, I found a 
missionary Bible training school, delight- 
fully located for a retired place to study. 
President Schultz was most cordial, and 
thoug'h many things were pressing, found 
an hour for the N. C. A. representative 
to address the students. A kind contribu- 
tion was given in aid of the work. A 
visit to the Concordia Seminary of the 
Missouri Lutheran church, in Fort 
Wayne, discovered a large institution 
with two hundred and thirty young men 
in its care. The special drill was on. and 
there seemed to be no opportunity to con- 
sider the lodge. President Luecke ex- 
pressed the hope that a lecture for the 
boys could be arranged later. 

A conference with our General Secre- 



58 



(^lIKlSilAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 19()i 



tary at Chicago resulted in the plan to 
piish the work in western Xew York dur- 
ing the month of May, in Ohio during 
June, and in central New York during 
July. It has been over twenty years since 
aggressive work was done in this section. 
There is surely a crying need. Lodges, 
big and little, like the Kansas grasshop- 
pers, eat everything green and leave deso- 
lation as they nniltiplv. I am hearing 
of lodge preachers who have been led 
into all manner of sins. One was run- 
ning a gambling arrangement in his 
church, offering chances on a ring said 
to be worth $50. The aggregate amount 
asked from those taking part in the gam- 
ble was $150. Any Christian should know 
that this cheating gambler should be in 
jail instead of in the pulpit. 

En route I met Ohio Synod Lutheran 
pastors in conference at Sharon, Pa. I 
found our good friend Irvine Caldwell, 
of West Middlesex, Pa., had met with 
a serious loss in the destruction by fire of 
a large barn that was struck by lightning. 
Two other barns nearby burned during 
the same storm. 

At Cambridge Springs, Pa., I met oLl 
and new friends. Through the kindness 
01 Dr. Gray I was given a permit to 
drink of the water that manv find help- 
ful. ' - 

The lodges have largely taken in the 
p^:ople at Erie, Pa. Some friends ^hcre 
take the Cynosure and want lectures. 

At Mayville,, New York, I found oUl 
father Merritt, now in his eighty-seventh 
year. When Brother S. E. Starry and T. 
over twenty years ago, w^orked the Ma- 
sonic degrees in halls and churches in 
western New York, and there was no 
small stir among the craft, Brother Mer- 
ritt contributed of his means and played 
the part of the Worshipful Master. lie 
has found it easier to appear as a Mason 
than to convince Masons that he is not of 
their number, after he has given the 
signs. He loves to think and talk of the 
old times, and much appreciated my 
visit. There are kind friends in May- 
vili'/ who pray and contribute to our 
work. 

Jamestown, New York, is getting to be 
a manufacturing center. About one -half 
the people are of Swedish origin. They 



once were free from lodge entanglements, 
but, alas ! some have given way. Pas- 
tors see and feel the evil influences of 
the lodges there. I am planning to help 
with lectures, etc. 

Last Sabbath I preached and lectured 
in the Wesleyan Methodist church near 
Levant, New York. The day was pleas- 
ajit. the attendance good. There were 
lodge people in the audience. My home 
y^^s with Brother A. D. Fero, the pastor, 
lie is doing good work. 

On Monday evening I spoke to those 
who gathered in the Gerry, New Yorl:, 
Free Methodist church. There is an or- 
phanage at this place, having about 
eighty of the needy little ones of earth 
in care. Also an old folks' home. Any 
v/ishing to contribute to a noble Chris- 
tian work can" send gifts to either of 
these homes. Both are in care of earnest 
Christian people. 

While at Jamestown I much enjo'/ed 
the hospitality of Bishop Sellew and nis 
good wdfe. During their recent trip 
around the world they gathered many 
curios that are worth. a trip to see. Th(-e 
people are doing a great work. 

Six of the Buffalo pastors have sub- 
scribed for the Cynosure since my com- 
ing and others will follow. To-morrow 
I hope to see the old Capw^ell home at 
Dale, New York, where I spent many 
happy days. If Providence favors, I go 
to Houghton Wesleyan Seminary for 
Sabbath. I am to lecture in the large 
Missouri Lutheran church of which Rev. 
Seick is pastor, on Monday evening. 
Other lectures are being arranged. 

I have written to Ohio friends. If 
replies are favorable, we shall hope for 
a State Convention to gather in Zanes- 
ville the last week in June. Let us pray 
that God will bless all efforts to the honor 
of His name. W. B. Stoddard. 



MICHIGAN AGENT'S REPORT. 

Sterling, Michigan, May 18, 1907. 

Dear Brother Phillips — I went from 
Tipton to Spring Arbor on April 23. At- 
tended an interesting prayer meeting in 
the evening at the home of the Free 
Methodist pastor. Rev. S. M. Stone. 
Next mornino- I grave a short talk before 
the students of the seminary, after chapel 



June, 1901 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



59 



exercises, on college fraternities. Brother 
B. J. Vincent, the principal, is v.ery much 
interested in the work of Anti-secrecw 
He kindly made arrangements for me to 
give several addresses on Secret Socie- 
ties in the Seminary auditorium. In the 
evening of the 24th, I lectured on The 
Principles of Secrecy to a good-sized au- 
dience. The next evening I spoke on 
The Unscripturalness of all Lodge Oaths, 
for all violate Lev. 5 :4-5, and all stand in 
the way of complete consecration to God. 
On Friday afternoon, after the close of 
the Seminary exercises, I spoke again on 
The So-called Lodge Benevolence, and 
also the injustice fostered, carried out 
and smuggled by secret societies. I also 
sold quite a number of books here, al- 
though a good many were already sup- 
plied. 

My stay at Spring Arbor was quite 
pleasant. I was very hospitably enter- 
tained in the home of Rev. S. ]\L Stone, 
the pastor of the Free ^Methodist church. 
I find most all the Free ]\Iethodist min- 
isters loyal to the principles of Anti- 
secrecy. Prof. B. J. Mncent, the prin- 
cipal of the Seminary, endeavored to 
make my stay both pleasant and profit- 
able. 

I next went to Battle Creek, but I could 
not find any open door there. However, 
I got to preach at the Methodist ^Mission, 
and distributed a number of tracts. 

]\Iy next stopping place was Holland. 
Here I was entertained very kirKlly in 
the home of Rev. A. R. ^lerrill, pastor 
of the \\>sleyan Methodist church, and 
secretary of the ?vlichigan State Christian 
Association. On the evening of ]\Iay 3 
I lectured on Secrecy in the \\'esleyan 
Methodist church. The weather was 
stormy, but the congregation was fair." 
On Sunday evening, the 5th, I preached 
in the same church on Separation from 
the World. There was good interest and 
attendance. 

On Monday evening the First Chris- 
tian Reformed church had a congrega- 
tional business meeting. The pastor. Rev. 
De Hahn. requested me to attend and 
give a talk after the business was finish- 
ed. It was an interesting sigiit to see 
the lar^re auditorium lialf full of men 



alone. There must have been about four 
hundred. I thought, here is a good ex- 
ample of an anti-secret church, which has 
its full share of men. Ministers are soli- 
cited and advised to join lodges, so as 
to win the men. Facts and statistics are 
against it. The churches which tolerate 
secret societies have fewer men than 
those which do not tolerate them. Christ 
is more attractive than secret societies. 

Xext morning Prof. Stegink invited 
me to address the Christian Reformed 
public school. The children of three 
rooms were crowded into one. They all 
listened very attentively while I talked 
to them about the evils of high school 
and college fraternities. At the close 
every one pledged himself to preserve his 
freedom, and never become enslaved to 
any secret institution. 

I sold quite a number of books in Hol- 
land, among all classes — ministers, teach- 
ers, business men, students and others. 

From Holland I went over to Chicago 
on the boat. There I spent several pleas- 
ant hours at the national headquarters. 
AMien I returned to Holland, the \\>s- 
leyan Ministerial Association was in ses- 
sion. Here, I heard, a number of Wes- 
leyan ministers made some good points 
against the Secret Kingdom. I also 
gave a short address. 

After returning to Elkton, I came to 
]\Ielita, in Arenac County. Here I preach- 
ed in the Wesleyan I\Iethodist church. 
There was so much interest that the pas- 
tor. Rev. G. W. Corey, requested me 
to hold meetings a few days for him. 

On ^Monday night I addressed the 
]\Ielita Citizens' Prohibition League on 
The Relation of the Lodge to the Sa- 
loon. At the close, one man, a back- 
slider, arose and confessed his backslid- 
ing and requested prayers. We stopped 
the program and had prayer. Xext 
morning he found peace and pardon. 

The remainder of the week I held 
revival services for Rev. G. ^^^ Corey. 
The interest increased greatly and the 
congregation trebled before the week 
closed. On Sunday morning we had 
three seekers. One was happily con- 
verted to God. So the Lord still works 
amonof men. G. A. Pesfram. 



60 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June. 1907. 



FRANCIS JAMES DAVIDSON'S REPORT. 

Greenville, ]\Iiss., May 17, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure — I have traveled ex- 
tensively since January, having covered 
3,6co miles and delivered 225 sermons 
and lectures, and distributed 10,000 
copies of religious and anti-secrecy 
tracts, and secured 500 subscribers to the 
Christian Cynosure and the Foreig'n Mis- 
sion Herald. I have made 1,000 reli- 
gious calls, in which I read the Bible, had 
family prayers, and discussed the lodo-e 
and other religious subjects. I have 
written 700 letters and postal cards. My 
expenses have been $151.25. My re- 
ceipts for literature sold has been $45. 
My collection for all purposes including 
foreign missions, have been $210.15, 
which has left me a balance of $63.90 
over and above all receipts from all 
sources ; but I rejoice that it is not by 
might nor by power, but by my spirit 
saith Jehovah. While I need the loaves 
and fishes, I have a higher aspiration 
actuating me than mere cents and dol- 
lars. 

I held a three days' institute meeting 
with the Bethlehem church of this city. 
The protracted rainy weather has caused 
all crops to be greatly hindered, which 
works a hardship to the poor. Neverthe- 
less they find money somewhere to keep 
up their lodge dues and assessments, and 
go on excursions. 

The Cynosure is read and greatly dis- 
cussed by the sons and daughters of the 
secret empire here in Greenville. 
AT BOVINA, MISS. 

The secret empire has very few sub- 
jects. I secured several Cynosure read- 
ers and did some good missionary work 
while visiting and distributing literature. 
I hope to attend the Warren County 
Baptist Association, which meets here on 
June 6. Quite a number of negroes in 
this section own farms of from 25 to 300 
acres, with good houses and orchards. 
The two races get along very harmoni- 
ously together. The negroes exercise no 
rights further than tilling the soil, and 
paying their debts. 

AT YAZOO CITY, MISS. 

I added a few more readers to the 
Cynosure and left a few tracts in good 
hands. When I preached here on March 
25, God wonderfully blessed the meeting. 



and five made confession of faith that 
night. 

Mrs. E. E. B. Covington, of Green- 
ville, who delivered several addresses 
here on ''Religious, Moral and Intellec- 
tual Development," was assaulted and 
beaten by a northern white man a few 
days ago, for reproving negro women for 
living in secret as well as open concubi- 
nage with white men — men who would 
neither own their unlawful children nor 
recognize them on the public streets. 
This unprovoked attack, save as it in- 
directly reproved this man for this very 
sin, caused a great deal of bitter race 
feeling for a few days, which might have 
proven serious, had not the very best 
class of white citizens come to the rescue 
of Mrs. Covington. The white man was 
fined $160 and taught a lasting lesson in 
the southern town .by a southern mayor. 
AT WINONA, MISS. 

I met the usual welcome, and preached 
the Commencement sermon for the Gren- 
ada and Zion College. I held a three 
days' institute which was very highly 
commended, and I think will bear fruit. 
I also secured a few more Cynosure 
readers and distributed tracts. 

AT GREENWOOD, MISS. 

I received a hearty welcome from Rev. 
H. W. White, who had arranged a meet- 
ing for me, but rain prevented the gath- 
ering of the people. I secured a few 
Cynosure readers and distributed tracts 
which I hope will do good. 

AT MOORHEAD, MISS. 

I found a friend of our cause in the 
superintendent of the infirmary. I preach- 
ed at night to a large audience and dis- 
tributed tracts. This city was settled a 
few years ago by northern Christians, 
and has the reputation of being the best 
and quietest town in the Sunflower coun- 
ty. There is no friction here between 
the races. The negroes operate one of 
the best brick stores, as well as several 
minor business places. There is a large, 
modern cotton mill and factory here, 
where the fleecy staple is made into cot- 
ton goods. 

AT INDIANOLA, MISS. 

I met a cordial welcome from Rev. T. 
B. Miles. He is an intelligent young min- 
ister, who, although deceived into joining 



Jane. llXiT. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



01 



the lodge a few years ago, is fully con- 
vinced of their anti- Christian spirit and 
is now strongly contending for a pure 
Gospel church separate from the world. 
He is a pastor of four churches and' 
moderator of the Sunflower County Bap- 
tist Association. I secured a few Cyno- 
sure readers, distributed tracts, visited 
the public school, lectured to them and 
left feeling that some good seed had 
been sown to the glorv and honor of 
God. 

AT ARCOLA, MISS. 
I addressed the Sunday School of 
Union Baptist Church, but while I was 
speaking a deacon came in and shouted, 
''Hit's late, time ter close dis here meet- 
in'." A few weeks ago when I was here, 
he refused to allow the church to be 
opened or the bell to ring for my serv- 
ices, notwithstanding the expressed wish 
of the pastor. 

I took occasion to attend an Odd Fel- 
low's service, held in the Hclly Grove 
Baptist Church. ^Ir. Johnson, the mas- 
ter of ceremonies, acted both wise and 
manly. He was very careful and guard- 
ed in what he said, and treated the lodo-e 
as a human invention, and held up the 
church as divine. The contrast and what 
followed was very marked. Deacon An- 
drew Hill praised the lodge above all 
other organizations, and struck a blow 
at all who do not join the lodge, styling - 
them as wanting both in knowledge and 
character. 

Rev. X. R. Matthews preached the 
sermon for them from the text: ''Come 
unto me all ye that labor, and are heavy 
laden, and I will give you rest." He 
commended all secret orders, and declar- 
ed that God had something to do with 
organizing them, because they were mak- 
ing the world better, bringing the negroes 
together, and building homes for orphans 
and widows. He declared "there is noth- 
ing wrong in secret societies which ought 
to keep Christians out." All good Chris- 
tians ought to join the lodge, "cause it 
would make dem better Christians." At 
the end of his sermon, however, he held 
up Christ as the only true way. and urged 
men to come to Him ; but he branched 
off again, quoting the text and declar- 
ing that all people should come to the 



lodge. Rev. :\Ir. Davis, a young Baptist 
minister of Leland, arose, arid quoting 
the same text declared that all the lead"^ 
ing men and all the educated men are 
secret order men. He told the audience 
that the text means "Com.e into the Odd 
Fellows' lodge; all secret orders is good 
and uplifting, and makes us better men 
and wonien ; everybody ought to join 
secret orders. God is the "Most Xoble 
Great Grand Father in Heaven." He 
swayed his audience and held them spell- 
bound. 

How can we expect a very general im- 
provement in the religious, m.oral and in- 
tellectual development of the negro so 
long as he is afflicted with such leaders ? 

At night 1 preached to a full house, 
but as I dwelt at length on what is- re- 
quired of Christians, and that God w^anrs 
us to be separate from the world, manv 
srose and repaired to the Methodist 
Church next dcor, wliere a man was ad- 
vertised to "cure them and make their 
souls alive with the flammg Word.". 

I forgot to give a few figures which 
the master of ceremonies gave in the 
Odd Fellows' meeting to which I refer- 
red. 

"The Odd Fellows is paying cut one 
dollar per minute, S500 per day. Si 2.000 
per month. \Yq raise S13.000 per month 
in ^lississippi, and pay out the above 
amounts as stated. \\'e have 13.000 Odd 
Fellows in good and regular standing. 
Our net increase last year was 5,000. Let 
the readers of the C}-nosure flgure on 
the amount that they v\-ould pav in a 
month if they paid at the rate of $i.co 
per minute, and collected that amouni 
from 13,000 members. If he could un- 
derstand hew it was done he would per- 
haps then understand some of the secret 
and hidden mysteries of the order. 

AT CA^IETA, .MISS., 
an appointment had been arranged for, 
but severe weatlier prevented a gather- 
ing. I secured a few new subscribers, 
talked of the evils of lodges to a few, 
and departed. 

I pray God for the opening of the eyes 
of my poor, deluded people to the evils 
of secret societies, no matter what the 
professed objects of these orders, the re- 



G2 



CHK1STIA^' CYXOSUKB. 



June, 190^ 



suits are harmful. I'ray for our deliv- 
erance from the unequal yoke of bond- 
ao-e. Francis [. Davidson.. 



FROM MRS. WOODS. 

Pine Bluff. Ark.. ^lav 13, 1907. 
Wm. I. Phillips: 

Dear Brother — I told you in my last 
letter some things the preachers were 
saying. \\d\, when I left that place I 
went to Brinkley, where my sister lives, 
with my secret order books. She is a 
member of the M. E. Church, so she 
asked me to go to her church with her, 
which I was glad to do. I went and she 
introduced me to her pastor, who said 
he w^as glad to meet with a missionary. 
He insisted on having me lecture to his 
people. I was so glad to get a chance 
to speak a word for Christ and show 
them my lodge books and tracts. I said, 
many good things for Jesus and at the 
last I laid my lodge books on the table 
and told them I had them to sell. I gave 
them a good many tracts. My sister be- 
longed to two orders at that time. I 
gave her the tracts, "Why I Left the Re- 
bekah Lodge." My sister quit both of 
these orders the next week. 

Well, when I got through with my 
lecture on secret societies those brothers 
were hot. They came w^here I took din- 
ner, three of them, and askeci me where 
did I get those books. I told them from 
the National Christian Association. One 
of them bought a Knights of Pythias 
ritual from me. They said that company 
(the N. C. A.) ought to be burnt up. 
One fellow said, "We wiU get them." 
I said, "They have already got you." 

I think they must have gone on horse- 
back that night and told all their men in 
the country ; five men came to my sis- 
ter's house, next day, that lived eight 
miles in the country, to see about those 
books. One man, a friend of my sister's 
husband, saw the books and got so mad 
that my sister w^as scared nearly out of 
her wits. She was afraid he would kill 
me, so she said to him, "You are my hus- 
band's friend ; I know you will not kill 
my sister." He said, "No, I am hke the 
fellow was about the bad dog that was 
biting the people in the settlement; I 
won't kill her, but I will give her such 



a bad name that somebody else will kill 
her." He is a steward of the A. M. E. 
Church and said that right before my 
face. 

After he left my sister begged me to 
let secret order books alone and go on 
and do mission work. She said, 'T 
know they are wrong; that tract was 
enough for me." 1 said, "Well, there is 
somebody else in these orders that is as 
blind as you were, and if Lstop handling- 
these books and tracts they will die blind 
and go to hell, and their blood would be 
on me." (Ezekiel 33: 6.) I said, "My 
sister, I would sin against God if L did 
not let the people know they were 
wrong." (James 4: 17.) My sister then 
fell down on her knees and cried to God 
to save me from harm. 

About one hour after that a white 
gentleman came in that we knew from 
childhood. I went into the next room 
and brought out my books and showed 
them to him. He looked at them till his 
eyes fell on a K. P. ritual, When he saw 
that book his coi/ntenance fell. I looked 
right in his eve and asked him how he 
liked that book. He said, "Lizzie, I am 
a K. P." I said, "Well, I got you that 
time." He said, "Yes, you have got all 
that we have." He said, "Lizzie, I think 
the Catholic Church is writing us up.'^ 
I said, "Oh, no, the Catholics are a secret 
order themselves." I said, "There are 
seventeen denominations tearing you up, 
and they are Christian men and women 
that have taken a stand for God." He 
said, "Well, if they are going to break 
up the K. P. lodge I hope they will break 
them all up." I said, "Yes, they are go- 
ing to hew old Agag down." (I Sam- 
uel 15: 32.) 

More to follow. 

Yours for Christian service, 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods. 
P. S. — This text is my motto : Rev. 
2: 10. 



Wc may not be able to convert the 
world, but we can do our part. That is 
all God, asks of us. It is tliy hand and 
thy might which God calls for. "Let 
him that heareth say. Come." He is a 
poor Christian indeed who cannot speak 
that one word of one syllable. 



June, 1901 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



63 



Irom ®ur aiail 



Litchfield, ^linn. 
I find the Cynosure a great help in 
fighting the lodges. 

(Rev.) Theodore Thurow. 



Brookville. Ohio. 
Fight boldly on. Turn on m(->re light. 
Tiie lodge cannot stand much of it. As 
soon as the light is on, they come out 
with their pewter sabers and rooster 
feathers to fight back. I recently ordered 
one hundred tracts, "Two Xights in a 
Lodge Room," and distributed them. 
Thev did much good. Yours in the work, 

Henrv ^Miller. 



Amboy, 111. 
I love the Cynosure and have taken it 
ever since its erdstence. Don't despair; 
Cod is with vou to destroy the anti- 
Christ. ' (Rev.) C. Bender. 



Corinna, ]\Iaine. 
I have read, loved and admired the 
Cvnosure for a quarter of a century or 
more. I am getting to be an old man. I 
shall never forget you dear people who 
have stood by its side so long and so 
well. "God bless them,'' is my prayer 
b\- dav and by night. Yours truly, 

Joseph Smith. 



Albia, Ky. 

I am so well pleased with the ^larch 
number of the Christian Cynosure that I 
want to get some sample copies of that 
number so I can send them to some peo- 
ple and try to get them to take Uie maga- 
zine. 

The secret societies are very strong 
and mean here, and I am doing all I 
can against them. I try to get the peo- 
ple to come out of them, as the Bible 
says (II Cor. 6: 17). I am glad to see 
the great work a'OU are doing against the 
works of darkness (Eph. 5:11). I wish 
vou much success. I have preached 
against the orders and they have threat- 
ened to kill me. But, of course, I have 
just preached on all the same (Luke 12: 
4) , and when they saw I did not fear 



them the}- got quiet, (jo on v.'ith the 
good work, and I will do all I can. I am 
}'Ours in the one good work, 

J. L. Davis (Evangelist). 



Xardin, Okla., Dec. 10, 1906. 
Enclosed find $1 for which please send 
Christian Cynosure for one }'ear. I was 
at a conference, talking about the results 
I had in a lodge fight in ni}- congregation, 
when one of my brethren recommended 
to me your magazine, from which to gain 
material against the secret societies. 
Yours truly, (Rev.) G. H. Hilmer, 

Ev. Luth. Pastor. 



Rev. William C. Paden of Billings, 
Okla., in a recent letter writes : 

"We had a small showing recently on 
the secret society question that gave me 
much disgust. An evangelist — ^Irs. ]\Ia- 
son, from Australia — gave over a two 
weeks' series of meetings here in the 
Christian church in our village. I was 
down to hear her a few evenings. She 
was a free speaker and emphasized her 
adherence to the Bible after the manner 
of the Christian brethren. But one 
evening, toward the close, she spoke in 
strong terms of her approbation of the 
Eastern Star and also of Freemasonry. 
'Tlicy arc founded on file Bible: She 
drew a strong parallel between their 
teachings and the teachings of the Bible ! 
Either she knew or did not know, and is 
culpable in either case. ^luch injury is 
done to the cause of truth by such pub- 
lic teachers. 

"1 read that Evangelist Sunday in his 
evangelistic meetings at Kankakee, 111., 
early this year, has been bearing like 
false witness with respect to the lodge. 
I do not care to carry such responsibil- 
itv." 



Waverlv, Pa. 
:\Ir. Wm. I. Phillips: 

Dear Sir — I thought some of not send- 
ing for the magazine after my subscrip- 
tion ran out, but I got to thinking it 
would be like parting with an old friend. 
I have been taking it since soon after it 
wa<? first published. I will renew for one 
year more. I am past 82 years. 

Simon Besecker. 



lU CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. Jnue. 1CH37. 

STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
CONCERNING LODGES 

FOR SALE BY 

The National Christian Association 
221 West Madison Street^ Chicago, Illinois. 



IMPORTANT INFORMATION -- HOW TO ORDER 

The safe«t as -^-ell as tke cheapest ways to get books are as follows: 

Always remit the full amount for your order by Bank Draft on CHICAGO or NEW YORK, 
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Write your name and post-office address PLAINLY and IN FULL, giving street address, post-office 
box number, or number of R. F. D. route and box number. If order is to be sent by express, name your 
express office (if different from post office\ and the express company by T^'hich to ship. 

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taken (no books shipped on approval; collection charges must be paid by customer. 

State BINDING and PRICE of EACH book ordered. 

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handle ANY books not advertised. 

TERMS: CASH WITH ORDER. We do not open accounts with individuals. Special discount 
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ON FREEMASONRY OTHER LODGE RITUALS 

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The complete ritual of the three degrees of .*^i>i^ .Ji^v^ivi-. i ij 

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Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the TRATED. 

institution and a critical analysis of the character The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, 
of each degree, hy President J. Blanchard. of Encampment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. By 
Wheaton College. :>lonitoriaI quotations and many a Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, 
notes from standard Masonic authorities confirm and guaranteed to he strictly accurate, with a 
the truthfulness of this work and show the " sketch of the origin, history and character of 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The the order, over one hundred foot-note quotations 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. from standard authorities, showing the character 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unitv' Lodge. No. 'l91, and teachings of the order, and an analysis of each 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, degree by President J. Blanchard. This ritual 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue corresponds exactly with the "Charge Books"' fur- 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations nished by the Sovereign Grand Lodge. Clotli, 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- $1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

L'nS'oi^-thl ?e|rie'"wIt°h"the°'dr''/s'^'of' cand!: REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS EIT- 

dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 UAL. 

pages, clotli, $1.00; paper cover, 60 cents. An exact copy of the new official ritual 

nxTA-DmTTTj Tk-ciriTs-P-co adopted by the Supreme Lodge of the World, with 

CHAPTER DEGREES. the secret work added and fully illustrated. Clotli, 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 75 cents; paper cover, 35 cents. 

Ma?ter'°Mosr Excllleot MasKrand^^Ro^fi i?S MODEEN WOODMEN OF AMEEICA EIT- 

degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal UAL. 

Chapter of the United States of America. Com- Complete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and illus- ficiarv and Fraternal degrees (illustrated), with 
trations. It gives the correct method of con- "unwritten" or gecret work, installation, funeral 
ferring the . degrees and the proper manner of ceremonies, odes and hymns. 35 cents. 
conducting the business of the Lodge. The __^^„.p.p^ pp-n TVTT'-M RTTTTAT. 
"secret work" is given in full, including the oaths, i*±iVi&i*iJ iiiuU jyiiiJN xtiiUAXi. 
obligations, signs^ grips and passwords. All of The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
which are correct and can be relied upon. The ac- Order of Rpd Men. comprising the Adoption De- 
curacy cf this work has been attested bv high and gree. Hunters Decree. Warrior's Degree Chiefs 
unimpeachable Masonic authoritv. Clcth, $1.2S| Deeree : with the odes, etc. Cloti, 75 cents; 
paper cover. 60 cents. paper, 35 cente. 



K^^GHT TEMPLAEISM ELLUSTEATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commanderv. comprising the 
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excellent Master. Knight of the Red Cross. Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A lock of 341 
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SCOTCH EITE MASONEY ILLUSTEATED 
The complete ritual oi the Scottish Rite. 4th 
to 33rd degrees inclusive, by a Sovereign Grand 
Commander. Profusely illustrated. The first 
chapter is devoted to an historical sketch of the 
Rite by President J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege, who also furnishes the introduction and analy- 
sis of the character of each degree. Over four 
hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
Masonic authorities « three hundred and ninety- 
nine of them foot-notes ) show the character and 
object of these degrees and also afford incontro- 
vertible proof of the correctness of the ritual. The 
work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
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HAN'DBOOK OF FEEE:MAS0NEY. 

By Edmond Ronayr.t-. last Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 63r». Chicago. This book gives 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
officer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry" — Entered Ap- 
prentice. Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
Lodge, and the signs, grips, passwords, etc.. all 
of which are accurately illustrated with So en- 
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c':ored verbatim, and can" t-e relied upon as cor- 
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clotli, $1.00. 

MYSTIC SHELN-E LLiU STEATED. 

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TINKHY ON MASONEY. 

"The Character. Claims and Practical Work- 
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G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President FinneV 
was a "bright Mason." but left the lodge when 
he tecame a Christian. This t-ook has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Clothe 75 cents; paper, 
50 cents. 

WASHINGTON, LINCOLN AND THEIE Ca 
PATEIOTS OPPOSED TO SECEET Sa 
CIETIES. 
Tiiis booklet contains fifteen portraits of 

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OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGEEES 

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FEEEMASONBY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 
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By Rev. James P. Stc^idard. This is an at- 
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conspiracies, symbolized in the 'Book of Revela- 
tion" ?" and is there now in active operation a 
system approximating the description given in 
Revelation? '^' == := a book both instructive and 
Interesting. 30 conts. 

MASONIC OUTEAGES. 

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SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

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SEEMON ON SECEETISM. 

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p 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS 



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EXPERIENCE OF STEPHEN MERRITT, 
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WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

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TWO NIGHTS IN A LODGE ROOM. 

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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 
221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



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CONTENTS. 



The National Anniversary — ■ 

News Items 65, 66 

Group of Delegates (from photograph) . .67 
Convention Report — Thursday Afternoon 

Session 68 

Address by Rev. J. P. Stoddard 68 

Educational Influence of the Lodge. By 

Rev. H. H. Hinman ......71 

Address by Mrs. Amanda Smith 73 

Address by Rev. G. A. Pegram 76 

Delusive Teaching in Present-day Preach- 
ing. By Rev. William Evans, D. D..81 

Treasurer's Annual Report 87 

Convention Letters from Absent Mem- 
bers 87 

News of Our Work — 

Ohio State Convention 92 

Rev. Swartz, Fraternal Delegate to Free 

Methodist General Conference 92 

Eastern Secretary's Report 92 

Agent Davidson's Report 98 

Report of Rev. G. A. Pegram 94 

Sherman Churches are Peculiar; Oddfel- 
lows Hear a Sermon .86 




MODERN SECRET SOCIETIES 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D, D., Pres. Wheaton College. 

FEATURES OF THE BOOK 

An important subject clearly 
and comprehensively, handled. 
Is kindly in tone^ 'j» '""vlded into 
short, interestiuo hapters, and 
is admirably ecio' ted to aid busy 
people. It ans^;/oi'8 the question, 
what Jesus would have one do. 

The Christian Endeavob 
World calls it : 

"AN ILLUMINATING BOOK." 
Plan of the Work : Part First 
answers object! or.r. and clears 
away the obstacles to a candid 
consideration of the question. 
Part Second treats of Free- 
masonry as the key to the whole subject. Part 
Third relates to subsidiary orders — industrial, 
insurance, temperance and other lodges. Part 
Fourth considers important questions grow- 
ing out of this discussion, such as: "What Do 
Lodge Burials Teach?" "Does Opposition to 
Lodges Injure the Persons or Churches that 0^ 
fer It? " " The Duty of the Hour," etc. 

300 pages ; cloth, 75 cents ; leather, $1.00. Ad- 
dress all orders to 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



221 West Madison Street, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Folly, Expense and Danger 

OF* 

Secret Societies. 

By CHARLES A. BLANCHARD, President 
of Wheaton College. 

They may be rudely classified as religious; 
«. g., the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfellow- 
ship, the Knights of Pythias, etc. : political, as 
the Know-nothings, Knights of the Golden 
Circle, the Order of American Deputies, the 
^uklux-Klan, the White League, etc.: indus- 
trial; as the unions of carpenters, bricklayers, 
conductors, engineers, etc.: insurance; as the 
Royal Arcanum, the Modern Woodmen, the 
/)rder of the Iron Hall, the Ancient Order of 
United Mechanics, etc.: and the social; as the 
college fraternities. Postpaid S cents each. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 
Entered at the Post Office, Chicago. III., at 



ser^ond class matte* 



VOLUME XL. 



CHICAGO, JlLY, 1907. 



NUMBER 3. 



THE NATIONAL ANNIVERSARY 

Thursday and Friday, June 13th and 14th, 1907. 



After days of cold and clouds and rain, 
the morning of the opening of the An- 
nual Convention was bright, warm and 
sunshiny. The two days of the Confer- 
ence were ideal, and the conference itself, 
except as to attendance, was all that could 
be desired. It is proposed to furnish the 
readers of the Cynosure with the ad- 
dresses and reports of the results of the 
business transacted. We wish that all 
our readers could have been present and 
have partaken in the enthusiasm which 
was created by the various addresses but 
which is largely lost in reading from the 
printed page. 

The officers of last year were re-elect- 
ed, with the exception of Rev. J. Groen, 
in whose place as Vice-President Rev. A. 
C. Dixon, D. D., of Chicago, was chosen, 
and on the Board of Directors, in place 
of Mr. John Morrison, Rev. B. H. Ei- 
nink, of Chicago, was elected. President 
Blanchard expressed his wish that some 
one else might be chosen as the head of 
the Association, since he had held the po- 
sition for several years ; but it was the 
earnest request of the members present at 
the Annual Meeting, that he accept the 
office for the coming year. The officers 
for the year 1907-1908 are: President, 
Rev. C. A. Blanchard, D. D. ; Vice-Pres- 
ident, Rev. A. C. Dixon, D. D. ; Record- 
ing Secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg ; Gen- 
eral Secretary and Treasurer, Wm. I. 
Phillips ; Board of Directors, Messrs. E. 

A. Cook, VV. B. Rose. C. A. Blanchard, 

B. H. Einink, S. H. Swartz, E. Breen, 
E. B. Stewart, Robert Clarke, B. E. 



Bergesen, J. M. Plitchcock, and H. F. 
Kletzing. 

The members of the Committee pre- 
senting the above names for election 
were: Rev. J. B. Stoddard, Boston; Rev. 
J. Groen, Grand Rapids, Mich. ; Mr. J. T. 
Cullor, West Liberty, Mo.; Rev. E. B. 
Stewart, Chicago; Rev. H. H. Hinman, 
Oberlin, Ohio; and Mr. A. J. Millard, 
Little Rock, Ark. 

The following persons were recom- 
mended for membership in the corporate 
body: Rev. L. G. Almen, St. Peter, 
Minn. ; Mrs. Emma Vvhitham, Pontiac, 
PL ; Miss Nancy S. Coleman, Sabetha, 
Kan. ; Mr. R. M. Stevenson, Siloam 
Springs, Ark. ; Mrs. Clara E. Morrill, 
Laconia, N. H. ; Mr. and Mrs. J. C. 
Woodward, Adams Center, N. Y. ; Mr. 
Samuel Russell, Kewanee, PL ; Mr. Nor- 
man Countryman, Rochelle, PI. ; Mrs. 
Mary P. Smith, Roxbury, Ohio ; IMiss 
Susan F. Hinman, Oberlin, Ohio ; Mr. 
and Mrs. R. A. Cullor, Lemonville, Mo. ; 
Rev. W. F. Cochran, Plainfield, PI. ; and 
Mrs. Amanda Smith, Harvey, PI. 

No one becomes a member of the cor- 
porate body, or an officer of the Associa- 
tion, until after the membership or the 
office has b^en formally accepted. Each 
of the above-named persons will be duly 
notified by the General Secretary of his 
(or her) election. We trust to number 
them all among the corporate members, 
since they have been for many years in 
sympathy with, and have also been active- 
ly helpful in advancing, the Work of the 
Association. 



GO 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1907. 




the program of the Convention of the 
National Christian Association. 



^yHEAT0N COLLEGE, 
In which Convention Met. 

The afternoon session of the first day 
of the Annual Convention was largely 
given up to extemporary addresses by 
different delegates present, and was one 
of the most enthusiastic sessions of the 
Conference. Some might wonder why 
such a wide range of topics was included 
in the discussions of this Annual Conven- 
tion. Not only was the Lodge discussed, 
but special emphasis was laid by one of 
the speakers upon the inspiration of the 
Bible, the deity of Christ, and the blood 
atonement; and the address of the last 
evening was a terrific arraignment of 
Christian Science. We wish to call the 
attention of those who are not acquainted 
with its Constitution, to the fact that the 
National Christian Association's business 
and object is not only to testify against 
Secret Societies, but ''other anti-Christian 
movements.'' The higher critics to-day 
are attacking and undermining faith in 
the Bible. Another special point of at- 
tack is the deity of Christ, and also His 
atonement. Satan is ''the god of this 
world," and as one speaker said, ''The 
world is full of religions, and every one 
of them is antagonistic to the Christian 
religion." As this Association is organ- 
ized to warn against and to remove those 
things which hinder the salvation of souls 
and the building up of Christ's Kingdom, 
it was eminently proper that such a pro- 
gram as was enjoyed should have been 



It was suggested by Mr. A. J. Millard, 
of Little Rock, Ark., that since two of 
the old veterans might possibly never at- 
tend another annual meeting, it would be 
pleasant to have their pictures taken, in 
a group of other delegates who might 
be willing. Mr. Roy Snell, who was 
present at the meetings consented to take 
the picture, and gathered a group under 
the trees on the college campus at the 
close of one of the sessions. In order 
from left to right, those sitting down arc: 
Mr. A. J. Millard, Little Rock, Ark. ; 
Mrs. Amanda Smith, Harvey, 111.; Rev. 
W. O. Dinius, Zion City, 111.; Mr. and 
Mrs. R. A. Cullor, Lemonville, Mo.; 
Rev. J. P. Stoddard, Boston, Mass. ; Rev. 
H. H. Hinman, Oberlin, Ohio; Rev. H. 
A. Day, Grand Rapids, Mich.; Mrs. li. 
Whitham, Pontiac, 111. ; Mrs. W. I. Phil- 
h'p.t, Wheaton, 111. Those standing, be- 
ginning at the left hand, are: Mr. F. A. 
Wood, Wheaton, 111. ; Miss Maris, Chica- 
go. 111. ; Rev. Samuel H. Swartz, Seneca, 
III.; Miss S. F. Hinman, Oberlin, Ohio; 
Rev. E. Breen, Chicago, 111. ; Rev. E. 
H. Parkinson, Chicago, 111. ; Mr. Nelson, 
Wheaton, 111. ; Rev. J. Groen, Grand 
Rapids, Mich. ; Rev. G. A. Pegram, Elk- 
ton, Mich.; Mr. J. T. Cullor, West Lib- 
erty, Mo.; Rev. W. F. Cochran, Plain- 
field, 111,, and President C. A. Blanchard, 
Wheaton, 111. 



There is something wrong with the vis- 
ion of him who cannot read in the works 
of God a hidden revelation of profound- 

er things. 



The loyal Christian who is willing to 
suffer rather than deny his Lord may be 
cast into a fiery furnace, but he need not 
fear, his Lord will not leave him there 
alone. 



July. 190' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 




fxS 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1907. 



CONVENTION REPORT. 
Thursday Afternoon Session. 

Rev. Samuel H. Swartz, Chairman. 

Prayer by Rev. H. H. Hinman. 

^Ir. Swartz : Coming from my home 
this morning to this Convention, a gen- 
tleman friend sat by me in the car. and 
he said, "Where are you going? are you 
going for a visit ?" I said, '*No ; I am 
going to attend the Convention of the 
National Christian Association, at Whea- 
ton." (This man is a member of my 
church.) He said, "The National Chris- 
tian Association?" ''Yes." 'T never 
heard of it. You do not mean the Y. M. 
C. A. ?"" "No," I said, "It is an organi- 
zation in opposition to Secret Societies," 
and you would have thought I had drop- 
ped a bomb in the seat. He said, "You 
are not engaged in any such business as 
that, are vou ?" I said, "Yes, most hear- 
tily ; have been for a long time, and ex- 
pect to continue in it until the Father 
says, Tt is enough, come up higher.' " 

I was thinking, as I was sitting on the 
platform here this afternoon, of the hon- 
ored and translated president of this col- 
lege, Jonathan Blanchard, the father of 
the present president, and of a number 
of others who are in sympathy and har- 
mony with me along this line of protect- 
ing the church against Secretism.- This 
movement originated in Pittsburg, if my 
memory serves me right, about 1868. I 
never shall forget the first time I met 
President Blanchard's father, a splendid 
old Roman. You could not look at him 
for a moment without realizing that he 
was a tower of strength. You had not 
to look at him very long before you be- 
came convinced that there was nothing 
in human 'flesh that could frighten him. 
He was a man who had come to his con- 
victions, not by any movement of feel- 
ing, but by the press of conscience con- 
secrated to God, and having found a 
place where his feet could stand, until 
the day of his death, he proved that they 
were planted to stay. I have always 
counted it a great privilege to have grasp- 
ed his hand and called him friend. I 
am always glad to remember that there 
is one chair in my parlor that Jonathan 
Blanchard sat in three or four times while 



he talked with me, and I am very care- 
ful of it, for there are gathered about 
it a great many delightful memories. I 
had some preconceived notions about the 
evils of Secretism before I had the priv- 
ilege of knowing this grand old man, but 
how it lifted me up out of the labyrinth 
of darkness and doubt that gathered 
around about me ! For I was hampered 
for a good many years by the "good 
man" theory. I looked at E)r. D. D. and 
LL. D. and he was a good man and all 
this and that, and he was great in the 
church ; and I thought, "Where is the 
harm? it must be ail right, or these 
men would not give themselves to it." 
But Jonathan Blanchard wiped the cob- 
webs off my poor eyes, and I am glad 
that it was my privilege to know him. 
I have a very tender spot in mv heart 
for President Charles Blanchard. I think 
I love him better than I do my brother, 
but I just venerate the memory of his 
grand old father — the sturdy old oak that 
all the whirlwinds of opposition could 
not uproot, and did not even twist. 

Since 1868 this organization has been 
on its feet and doing "its work, and some, 
are here that knew it in its beginning — 
or pretty nearly in its beginning. Our 
dear old brother Hinman knows all 
about it from its inception. A good many 
have gone over to enjoy the results of 
their life, in the presence of the Father, 
and some of us w^ho are nearer than we 
once were are working with our might 
to make us worthy to stand in such a 
place. We have some of those old heroes 
here this afternoon. Brother J. P. Stod- 
dard is one of the earlier workers in this 
service, and as I have gone over this 
country from Iowa to Michigan, and in 
Pennsylvania, in this work, I have met 
his name everywhere. They know him, 
and he has left the impress of his 
thought and power in these places where 
he has worked, and so I am going to 
ask him to talk to you this afternoon. 

Rev. J. P: Stoddard : I am glad to be 
here. I am glad to see the faces that 1 
have seen in other days. These are old 
familiar soldiers with me m this great 
conflict. I greet you. I bring you greet- 
ings of the New England Association. 
I bring to you many encouraging words 



July, 1907, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



69 




JAMES P. STODDARD. 

as to the condition of that part of the 
country, even though we have parted 
with some of our best men — Brother 
Bergesen and Brother Dixon — who have 
been led to leave us for other fields of 
labor. The work is going on all the 
time. I am glad to see the younger faces 
with the old stagers, for the old ones 
will soon be absent. I am reminded that 
the voices I have heard ringing here in 
this old hall in other days in the defense 
of every g-ood cause, are silent to mortal 
ears, but they are now singing in the 
choirs of God. But the echoes of their 
utterances are still ringing down the 
years. And when those of us who are 
here will be wearing crowns of glory, 
if we walk in the way of righteousness, 
and will sing in that choir, these young 
men and women must take up the bur- 
dens that we lay down and carry on the 
work. I rejoice to see the yoimger faces 
here to-day. I suppose it will be proper 
for me to bring some report from the 
Orient to the Occident. Out here you 
are looking to the East for light ; I want 



to say to you that we are not beyond 
where the sun rises — it still rises in the 
East, even if. vv^e are in Boston ; and 
we are looking that way for light. 1 
am glad to bring to you words of en- 
couragement, and to say to you, if you 
are pleased with the samples of men that 
we have sent you, or who have left us 
without our consent, we have more oi 
the same sort — I would not say better, 
because you might not agree with me ! 

God is at work in New England. I 
want you to keep this fact in mind. Men 
are not carrying on the work down 
there: there is One greater than the 
armies of Xapoleon and their famed lead- 
er, v/ho is leading step by step, day by 
day, month by month, and year by year. 
The New England Association clasps 
hands with the parent association as its 
child, but one aspiring to be worthy of 
the source from which it sprung. I say 
(jod is in the movement. Some of you 
know how my companions and myself 
went there ; we took nothing but the 
prayers and the good will of the breth- 
ren here, except that Brother Phillips, 
I believe, gave me one hundred dollars 
to pay the traveling expenses out there ; 
that is what we had to begin with. Well, 
it was enough. I have come to a time of 
life and experience when I pity children 
that are reared from their birth in afflu- 
ence, and who inherit everything that 
money can buy. They are to be pitied 
more than the children who are educated 
in Wheaton College and from thence sent 
out with right ideas about immortality 
and about these questions that are agitat- 
ing the labor institutions of the country. 
We had enough. I did not think so at 
the time, but God thought so ; and it 
was in His plan and was better than my 
wa}"s. We began there with a very small 
beginning. We can trace the good hand 
of God in all of our good ; sometimes in 
holding us back, sometimes in. withhold- 
ing in His great mercy, and sometimes 
in bestowing all. It has all been the 
hand of God. He has brought us through 
manv difficulties — difficulties to us, 
though they were not difficulties to Him. 
Times have been when it seemed as 
though we had nothing of human sup- 
port to lean on ; times when we could 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1907. 



see that the experience was worth more 
than money. 

But I must speak of the condition in 
New England to-day. Joseph Cook has 
gone ; that sainted man who spoke to 
you here in this hall at the time of the 
World's Fair in Chicago, of his work 
there. He is gone, and others have gone ; 
those pillars of strength and towers of 
luminous thought and conscience ; but 
God has a few left, and we have come 
along until we have a home. It is a 
good deal to have a home. 1 can see 
the faces of persons here that even when 
they got married did not have homes of 
their own. I was in that class, and I 
remember that when there was a place 
in the world that had shingles on it that 
I called my home, I thought it was a 
great event in my life. It was an event 
when Philo Carpenter tendered the home 
and headquarters of the National Chris- 
tian Association on condition that thirty 
thousand dollars should be raised to sup- 
port the anti-secrecy work. It was an 
event when Philo Carpenter accepted the 
thirty thousand dollars and deeded that 
building to the National Christian As- 
sociation ; it then had a home, a roof and 
a shelter, a place where it could defend 
itself and where the law would defend 
it as it prosecuted its work. 

Well, Brother Bergesen here knows 
what the New England home is ; he has 
been there, an efficient worker in New 
England. Its location is very desirable ; 
in the heart of the city, at the junction of 
important streets, and only a short dis- 
tance from the libraries and music halls 
and other public places. And I can say 
today that that building is paid for ; there 
is not a cubic inch in the building that 
is not paid for; there is not a brick in 
the five stories that is not paid for ; not a 
ti^e on the roof, nor an article of furni- 
ture in the house, that is not paid for; 
and I am going to tell you Who has done 
it. God has done it, and God owns that 
liouse ; and every day, either in Boston 
or out of it, I am reminded of the fact. 
We say that it belongs to the New Eng- 
land Christian Association ; but we hold 
the deed of it for Him, subject to His 
ilisix)sal. It is marvelous in my eyes; 
it is wonderful. Some of you know that 



George Buck gave us ten thousand dol- 
lars in his Will, conditioned on our rais- 
ing fifteen thousand dollars additional 
within one year, all to be put into this 
w^ork. It fell to my lot to raise that 
fifteen thousand dollars, spot cash. It 
looked to me like quite an undertaking. 
If I bad had the persuasive eloquence of 
your college president, and the eclat that 
education gives to a movement, and the 
endorsement and the dignity that comes 
through the general desire to protect 
education, it would not have looked sO' 
formidable, to me; but think of it ! the 
most unpopular man in New England,, 
and the most unpopular cause, I was go- 
ing to say, that God's sun shone upon 
in that whole country, starting out ta 
rai.se fifteen thousand dollars in cash — - 
a!l to be in cash — in one year ! You can 
apprehend something of the problem and 
the difficulty, and while I felt this, I w^as- 
glad to go and do it, and I was chosen 
of God, and chosen to help Him, and 
I was blessed in my labor. I went to- 
work and gathered that money into the 
First National Bank of Boston three days 
before the time that it had absolutely to- 
be raised. I notified the trustees who 
held the ten thousand dollars that the 
required amount and forty-two dollars 
and some cents over was on deposit in 
the First National Bank, and I was ready 
to meet them. When they came, I pre- 
sented them a little slip of paper, which 
was a certified check showing that the 
whole amount of fifteen thousand and 
forty-two dollars and some cents was de- 
posited in the Fifst National Bank, and 
one said to the other, "I guess that is 
all right ; I guess there is only one thing 
to do," and I said, "I think so." They 
had anticipated the result, and so Mr. 
Brown took out of his pocket a certified 
check for ten thousand dollars and gave 
it to me, and I handed it to the treasurer. 
Brethren and sisters, if you know of any- 
body besides God that could do such a 
thing as that, I would Hke to know who 
it is. I take not one particle of credit 
to myself. If you do not believe that 
the good hand of God has been in that 
work, as I said, you are incredulous in- 
deed against a demonstration that is suffi- 
cient to hang any man for murder. 



July, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



71 



Now, it is wonderful what God can- 
do, inferred from what He has done, and 
so He moves on the hearts of the people. 
Why, there was a good lady whom I 
have had to do business with — well she 
had her own way of saying things, as 
well as of doing things, and it is a good 
thmg to have dealings with peculiar peo- 
ple at times, I find ; you get a kind of 
discipline which you cannot get in any 
other way — not very long ago I had quite 
a little business transaction with her in 
settling up her husband's estate. She 
thought that her husband had given con- 
siderable to the association. I received 
notice of her death, notice to appear at 
the Probate Court in Worcester. I was 
there a week ago last Tuesday at 9 
o'clock in the morning, and met Judge 
Forbes, whom I know. I did not sup- 
pose she had left anything for the asso- 
ciation ; I thought it was a little strange ; 
l)ut still I am interested in all good peo- 
ple, and all good causes, so I wenr. 
When the Will was opened I found she 
had left a thousand dollars for the as- 
sociation. It was a surprise to me — or 
would have been some time ago, but I 
am not surprised at anything now. Who 
but God did that, or could do it? You 
could not do it ; I do not believe President 
Bianchard could do it without God'? 
help. 

So the good hand of God has been 
leading us along step by step. -We have 
a building there now that is worth $25,- 
000. I suppose if it had to be $old to- 
day it could not be sold for more than 
$20,000, but property values are advanc- 
ing; it is not for sale, however, it is 
for use. 

I want to say to you that the God of 
the Orient is the God of the Occident. 
1 could begin at the commencement of 
this movement, when I became identified 
with it and worked for some time for 
just what the people would give me and 
trace from my own personal knowledge 
and saw the growth and development of 
it, but you have some of you seen it. 
'Tear not, little flock ; it is your Father's 
good pleasure to give you the kingdom." 
This is God's movement; it is God's 
cause; this is God's country, and it shall 
be an empire for our Lord Jesus Christ. 



We have only to fight for a little sea.-on, 
and if He comes we will till then work 
for Him ; and, if He says, Rest until I 
come, we will rejoice. Be faithful unto 
death and God shall reward you. 



Mr. Swartz : We have another mem- 
ber of the old guard with us this after- 
noon, one who has seen many battles, 
one who has stood in the fight fearless- 
ly, not for the honor of men that comes 
from it — for let me tell you, young man, 
that is not honor ; because true honor does 
not come this way — not for the honor 
that comes from men, but for the glory 
of God. I want to introduce to you 
Pev. H. H. Hinman, one of the fathers 
in the Gospel and one of the fathers in 
this Cause. 

Mr. Hinman : I thank the Heavenly 
Father that I am once more permitted to 
meet with the National Christian Asso- 
ciation in its Annual Meeting and to join 
in its testimony against Secret Societies. 
It is doubtless the last time that I shall 
ever do so and I wish to emphasize all 
I have said in the past, by once more 
affirming some of those evils which make 
it the duty of all good citizens to cry 
out in protest against the present uncon- 
cern on this vital question. 

I have become old and feeble ; I do 
not attempt to talk in public ; I have 
written down a few lines expressing my 
views on the subject of Secret Societies, 
and have asked my daughter to read them 
to you. I will beg to be excused from 
making any speech, but shall simply in- 
troduce to you my daughter, and ask her 
to read. 

Mr. Swartz : Brother Hinman's 
daughter will read what he has written. 
Brother Hinman, it is tnie, is just wait- 
ing in the twilight, and sometime between 
the gloaming- and the dawning- the Father 
will send His messenger and kiss him 
into eternal life. 

EDUCATIONAL INFLUENCE OF THE 
LODGE. 

REV. H. H. HINMAN. 

Among- the more obvious of the evils 
of the lodge system are: ist. The un- 
equal yoking of believers with unbeliev- 
ers in associations that are not of Divine 
appointment and are not for the promo- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1007. 



tion of the Kingdom of Christ. Thvs is 
distill ctl;,- forbidden in God's word (II. 
Cor, 6 : 14-18). 2d. The union in a wor- 
ship that is not in the name of Clifist and 
does not even profess to be distinctively 
Christian. 3d. The uniting" of cere- 
monies which at best are simply frivolous, 
and 4th, the uniting in oaths and cove- 
nants that are extrajudicial and profane. 
The promise to do or to conceal w-hat 
the promiser is presumed to be entirely 
ignorant of and upon the moral nature 
of which he is not at liberty to pronounce 
a judgment, makes a human institution 
rather than the law^ of God the supreme 
rule of his life. Xo one has a right to 
enter into such a covenant. 




nix MAX. 



But what I wish to notice particularly 
is the covenant of inviolable secrecy. This 
is the basic principle of the entire sys- 
tem. It is the educational influence of 
sworn secrecy that corrupts society. This 
is illustrated by the Brownville affair. 
It is not singular that there should be 
colored soldiers ; as citizens they have 
like duties and responsibilities v/itli 
others. Nor is it strange that under 
probable provocation they should, some 
or them, be excited to unlawful riot re- 



sulting in the death of certain persons. 
Neither the race nor the brigade are to 
be held responsible for the acts of .'hcse 
rioters. But the great wrong, for which 
the entire body of colored soldiers was. 
responsible, was in the refusal to tell 
what they knezv — that they did not feel 
bound to expose their comrades and 
heartily unite with all good citizens in 
vindication of the law and for public se- 
curity. It was for this great wrong that 
they were discharged by the President. 
We do not know whether there was any 
special promise made by these soldiers 
to conceal the crimes of their comrades ; 
but we do know that the society of Free 
Masons, both white and colored, includ- 
ing a majority of the members of Con- 
gress, the President and Vice President 
of the United States and many professed 
ministers of the Gospel, are bound in 
an oath to conceal the crimes of their 
Masonic brethren under some circum- 
stances and that there are not wanting 
many instances in which this covenant 
has been kept. The abduction and mur- 
der of Wm. Morgan _ must have been 
known to many Free Masons who felt 
bound by their oaths to keep silent. I. 
do not mean to affirm that all Free i^.Ia- 
sons conceal crime. What I do affirm 
i,;, that it is an educational influence 
which powerfully tends to corrupt so- 
ciety. 

The vast amount of juvenile crime, 
alike the disgrace and the problem of our 
city governments, is largely upheld and 
promoted by the practice of refusing to 
tell of the crimes of their associates. Boys 
regard it as dishonorable to do so. They 
are educated in this^ perverted sense of 
honor and patriotism by the example of 
their fathers and by public officials. 

This malign education is largely due 
to the great horde of secret societies. 
Secret societies in our high schools are 
coming to be very generally regarded as 
highly injurious to good morals and 
school discipHne. They are simply cor- 
rupters of our youth. But precisely the 
same objections hold against college and 
all other secret fraternities ; until we can 
do away with the educational influence 
of the secret lodge system, we have no 
right to expect universal honesty, frank- 



July, 190T, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



ness and simplicity of character among 
the rising generation. 



Mr. Swartz : We have with us to- 
day an honored servant of God who was 
born in bondage, physically, as she was 
conceived and born in sin morally and 
spiritually. She has lived to slip away 
from the fleshly bondage, and by the 
infinite grace of our divine Redeemer she 
has gotten out from under the condemna- 
tion from sin, and has the precious seal 
of Christ's covenant upon her as His 
child. She has traveled all over the 
world. I sat here tli inking about it a 
moment ago, as I looked into her face. 
It has been my privilege to travel wide- 
ly myself, and in going to many differ- 
ent climes I have met many different 
people, under many different circum- 
stances, and yet, I thought, God by His 
great economy has led this woman from 
corner to corner of the world, and she 
has gone as a witness of the living God, 
proclaiming the risen One, and holding 
Him up, and she has won thousands upon 
thousands of stars for her crown. I am 
not surprised to find her here, and ready 
to talk on this subject. I introduce to 
you Sister Amanda Smith. 

Mrs. Amanda Smith : I would not 
have missed this meeting for anything, 
and I thank the doctor here and all the 
rest of the people who had to do with 
the invitation of my coming and giving 
a testimony. As Mr. Hinman's paper 
was being read just now, I went back 
in my mind and thought how I washed 
I had known there was such an asso- 
ciation as this twenty years ago. I did 
not know that people dared to talk about 
these things. I thought that people were 
kind of muzzled ; that there was a kind of 
death penalty if you should speak out 
^vhat were your convictions of things as 
have been expressed in the paper that 
was just now read. 

I was born the 23d day of January, 
1837. I was converted on the 17th day 
of March, 1856; I sought and obtained 
pardon through faith in Jesus Christ. I 
received the baptism of the Holy Spirit, 
which sanctified my heart, the first Sun- 
day in September, 1868. It was won- 
derful, the light that dawned on my soul, 




MRS. AMANDA SMITH. 

as never before. My husbands, both of 
them (I have been married twice) were 
high Masons and Odd Fellows — very 
high-up, big men. Somehow or other, 
the light that dawned on me under this 
special baptism seemed to clear my spirit- 
ual vision and brought me to seriously 
consider things that I used to think were 
very nice. I remember when we first 
came to New York from Philadelphia, 
my husband was very anxious that I 
should join what w^as called the Heroines 
of Jericho. None but Master Masons 
and their wives could belong. We wxre 
strangers, and the lodge, they claimed, 
got you into society; and of course my 
husband was very anxious that I should 
move in that society that was up. I liked 
it myself pretty well ; it meant when you 
belonged there, that you were a little 
above the average, don't you know? 

So I was induced to join the Heroines 
of Jericho, and a little later — I lived close 
to God, and prayed and wanted to walk- 
in the light as He gave it to me — I found 
myself suddenly coming into contact with 
a trouble in my conscience in regard to 
these things, and it was a great trouble 
to me to just make up my mind that I 
would not be bound by them. There 
were other troubles in connection with 
the church, and I felt that I must get 
out of it. I talked to some of my friends 
about leaving the lodge, who were sur- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1907. 



prised, and they hooted at the idea, and 
they told me about the different degrees, 
and how I would be promoted if I would 
stay in. and be way up here and there. 
AMien I would attend meetings, one of 
the things that would fix the condition 
in my mind was a revival. We had a 
meeting, the colored people, like we used 
to have, where people got converted and 
happy (we have gotten like other folks 
and don't have these old time revivals 
as we used to have) ; I noticed many of 
these people, members of the church, who 
had children and friends who were seek- 
ing the Lord, that on the night of the 
society meetings they would not be at 
the church meetings, or maybe vvould 
come late, and sometimes the meetings 
would drag for want of help ; and as a 
rule the best workers in the church were 
the ones who united with the societies, 
both men and women. These peo- 
ple would stay away from the church 
meetings, or if they came in late they 
were cold and indifterent and sat away 
back; their interest was all gone into 
the secret society, so that when they came 
into the meetings they were kind of dead 
and played out — didn't sing, didn't +akc 
hold — or if there was anybody having a 
great struggle and he got converted, 
there would be a little enthusiasm at the 
time, but there it ended. If you said 
anything about it they would get very an- 
gry at you, you know. Nobody dared 
say a word to them about it. I began to 
think. How is it? And when I would go 
to the society and speak about it, and 
would say, "It is meeting night and I 
will not be here," they would go for 
me. So I began to get more and more 
convicted. ■ And then I noticed the spirit 
which they would manifest many times 
under little tests. I have seen the society 
people get as mad as hornets, and say 
such hard things that just a real uncon- 
verted person that had no religion at all, 
and made no profession, would not mani- 
fest a more ugly spirit. I have seen it 
so many times. I remember one woman 
I called upon in Baltimore, a member of 
a secret society. They got their sick 
benefit, so much, if they were not seen 
out of bed — the terrible deception in this 
•"?se. I knew this woman very well; she 



had been sick a long time, but she was 
not confined to her bed; she could just sit 
up. This morning she got up and had 
her wrapper and slippers on and was 
sitting by the window. The bell rang, 
and she said, ''Look out and see who 
it is." I looked out at the window (the 
shutters were bowed), and I described 
the person who was standing at the door. 
She said, 'That is so and so from the 
visiting society," and she jumped into 
bed with slippers and all on, to make be- 
lieve she had not been up. I said, 'T do 
not believe in that sort of thing." I got 
mad right then and there. I said, "I 
would not do that thing, if I never got 
an3thing out of the society." I said, 'Tt 
is deception. It is not right. In order 
to get your dues that you have paid into 
the society, you have to make believe 
that you are not what you really are; 
because if they catch you sitting up you 
cannot get your dues, the whole thing 
is done, and it might be weeks before 
you could get out." Lots of things like 
that came along. It was not an easv 
thing for me to break with the society, 
because I had a great many friends and 
they tried to persuade me, and I tried to 
persuade myself that it was right because 
they were kind friends, and good and 
nice people, and I wanted to keep in with 
them (I don't mean in the sense that 
we use ''keeping in" with people, but I 
did not want to do anything that would 
break up the friendship and be rude and 
rough, and all that sort of thing), but 
I . found I had got to a place where I 
had to dare myself, and I said, "B7 
the grace of God I am out of this thing.'^ 
I remember the last woman I talked 
to. Her husband was a high Mason and 
my husband w^as a high Mason, and they 
were all against me, and they looked 
cold at me and snubbed me and all that 
sort of thing, which was very hard to 
bear. But I got down to business and 
got out; and how glad I am that the 
Lord delivered me from all these snares f 
I remember when the light dawned on 
me about the Free Masonry. My hus- 
band was a Mason and all, and I was 
afraid of him. The devil said to me, 
"Just as sure as you say a word about 
it they will kill you." And then I thought 



July, 1901 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



of the abduction of Morgan, which I had 
read about; and he said, "They will think 
you have got some of their books and are 
reading them, and women have no busi- 
ness reading Masons' books." I got 
scared, riding around in the cars at night, 
and I thought, ''Some night they will 
do you just like they did Morgan." That 
is what the devil told me. At any rate 
I think he told me ; it seemed very much 
like his talk. I think it must have been 
him, and it frightened me. I went on 
in this state for days and weeks and 
months. Sometimes I would get up in 
the meeting, and I would want to just 
out with it and tell what I felt — how 
the Lodge was hindering the progress of 
the church ; but the devil said, "Now just 
as sure as you tell it — you have to go 
such and such places when it is night, 
and some of these nights you will be 
dragged off the cars and you will be dead, 
and then you cannot say anything. It 
looked to me as though it was so, and 
I kept it in my heart. I went out to 
Chester Heights camp meeting. I was 
talking to Dr. Patterson, who lived in 
Philadelphia, a great Mason, a white 
man, a splendid man of God, but he was 
bound by this fraternity. In this meet- 
ing I up and out with my trouble, which 
had held on to tne so long; I could not 
keep it, and I said, Live or die, sink o-r 
swim, I will tell how I feel about it" ; 
and I remember Dr. Patterson 4:ame up 
and shook hands and said, "Nobody is 
going to kill you ; it is all right ; I be- 
lieve the Lord put it into your heart to 
say it, and it is all right, and you will 
not be killed." I kind of did not care 
if I was, then; I had got desperate. I 
got where I did not care much about any- 
thing that men did, just so I knew that 
I was in the favor of God and pleased 
Him. So I got along with that. 

It seems to me a meeting like this, and 
the testimony in this paper that has just 
been read, give light and strength and 
help to all people who are tempted; for 
surely every word of testimony in this 
program, so far as my knowledge goes, 
and my convictions go, whether they be 
present or what has been in the past, is 
just as true as preaching; all the hind- 
rances to progress in the education of 



the young, the hindrances to spiritual de- 
velopment in the church, I have seen ; not 
only in one place, but in every place 
where this spirit rules and predominates, 
there is the same result. 

I once saw a great party of the Ma- 
sons, and the thing that I cried over, and 
felt most sorry over, in that beautiful 
profession, was a blind man, a high Ma- 
son, but he was blind; and I said, "O 
Lord, that is the condition of the whole 
crowd; all of them blind as bats," and 
I said, "The saddest thing on the face 
of the earth is a blind Free Mason." 
They were all blind, going along with 
the music playing; they looked grand, 
but they were blind, all of them. • But 
this man was physically blind. 

I used to cry over these things. I 
would cry and feel so sorry in my heart, 
and would like so much to give a little 
testimony at those times. You know how 
it is, when any special inspiration for a 
testimony, a real conviction, comes to you, 
that is the time that you can just let it 
go ; then how much good it would do ! 
How many times I have got to that point 
where I thought, "I just wish I could 
tell them how I feel about it!" That is 
the way it has been. I do not know that 
we need anything else now than simply 
to know whether or not the testimonies 
in these programs have ever been your 
convictions; and if they have been, and 
you have got through, you have done a 
wonderful thing to get through. 

I am glad that God has some people, 
and I am glad that these old gentlemen 
are here and those ladies are here. We 
can get into a meeting of this kind (if 
this was the other kind we could not 
get in) and I think the Lord wants us 
to speak candidly and kindly to each 
other, and if you cannot do it consecu- 
tively, read the testimonies in the pro- 
gram, and when you recognize these 
facts stated in the testimonies; — to me 
they are facts — of course they bring them 
out in a more clear, definite and orderly 
manner than I could — just say, '^'That is 
so ; that is just what I think." I remem- 
ber how Brother Stoddard year after 
year would be at the camp meeting, and 
would give me literature ; and he has 
gone around as a faithful, valiant soldier 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1007. 



of the cross, testifying- and protesting 
every clay. I expect he has had a good 
many hard knocks, bnt he is wilhng to 
do it. I pray that the Lord may bless 
every yoinig man and woman here. To 
you that have a good deal of time before 
you I say, It is good to help somebody 
else out of a snare into which you may 
have fallen. 



Song by Mrs. Amanda Snuth : "He 
Rolled the Sea Awav." 



^Ir. Swartz : I have been carried 
away back this afternoon, while I sat 
here and listen to Sister Amanda Smith. 
I met her thirty odd years ago. When 
I first met her in New York — she can 
sing to-day, but she could sing then. I 
tell you she could SING then. I heard 
her sing thirty-five years ago, when she 
would just make the tears roll down vour 
cheeks. I was born a Methodist, a roar- 
ing, shouting Methodist ; I was convert- 
ed all alone with my mother, I was not 
converted in a revival, or at camp meet- 
ing, I was converted all alone, on my 
eleventh birthday, in my mother's bed 
chamber, as we knelt together at the 
chair that had been my cradle; and as 
my mother, with her hands upon my 
head, prayed that God would saye her 
boy, and then I prayed, and God in an- 
swer to my prayer came into my heart on 
that beautiful May morning, I just jump- 
ed to my feet, and wrapped my arms 
about my mother's neck, and I said, 
"Glory ! I don't know what it is, and I 
don't care, but I have got it ! Hallelujah !" 
I have had it ever since. You have car- 
ried me away back. Sister Amanda, to 
those old days at home, where I first 
saw your face. Those links, they come 
into life, you know, and they pick up 
the broken threads of the warp and woof 
and join them together again. It makes 
me think of the time that is coming, when 
we get done with the battle here below, 
and the broken threads will be reunited. 
President, your father will be there, and 
I loved him ; and my father will be there, 
and our mothers, and our loved ones ; the 
broken threads are all going to be re- 
united by and by, and blessed be God, 
the higher register of our voices will all 



be restored, and we will sing F sharp as 
clear as we ever sung it when a boy or 
girl. 

I have another party I want to talk 
this afternoon — Brother Pegram, a 
Methodist minister, a man who knows 
something about the iron that comes into 
a man's blood when he does his duty; a 
man that knows something of the cost 
of doing his duty; it costs' just as much 
to be loyal to the Lord Jesus Christ to- 
day as it ever did. There may be half- 
hearted ones who apologize for the devil, 
and you can carry a soft covered Bible 
under your arm for respectability's sake, 
and have a real good time, but when you 
get ready to be out and out for God 
Almighty on every question that touches 
humanity, and reaches up to God's 
throne, you are not going to have easy 
sailing. The devil is not done yet. His 
funeral has not been appointed. Maybe 
it is a good thing for us ; it will keep 
us fighting until the Father sends His 
discharge, which brings us as worn vet- 
erans to home in glory by and by. 

Rev. G. a. Pegram : Brother chairman, 
I was not aware of why I was put on this 
program. I suppose I am the youngest 
member of this fighting fraternity, so far 
as organized anti-secrec}^ is concerned. 
I thought that probably they wanted to 
put me on the program as a sample of 
the products of secret societies. I have 
been a Methodist Episcopal minister for 
a little over seven years, and I have lost 
nearly one thousand dollars of salary be- 
cause I was opposed to Secret Societies. 
It is strange, when I left Boston I weigh- 
ed about 165 pounds, and I began to 
preach, and ever since that the secret 
societies have been trying to starve me 
out, and you see how they are succeed- 
ing. Now I do not know whether Broth- 
er Groen has suffered more than I have 
or not ; we are going to settle that before 
we leave this town, but this is a sample 
of their product ; they have been trying 
to starve me out for seven years, and I do 
not know how it will come out, but I 
am still going on to perfection. 

Well, thank the Lord, I am laying up 
treasures in heaven. Brethren, I realize 
this, that whatever is cut off of my sal- 



July, 11X)1 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



ary, even after it is promised and they 
do not promise, probably, as much as they 
ought to — I reaHze that what they do cut 
off is laid up in heaven, and I am get- 
ting a good bank account. I am giving 
a tenth of all the rest and I believe I am 
becoming a millionaire in glory. 

\Vq are all soldiers here, and Sister 
Smith was talking about ''rolling the sea 
away." You remember that ^Nloses told 
the children of Israel to stand still; that 
is just like presiding elders talk to young 
preachers, but the great Bishop of our 
souls sent down a message from the 
throne, "Speak to the children of Israel 
that they go forward.'' I suppose that 
among so man\- old veterans there are 
some who were veterans in military war- 
fare, and it just reminds me of a story. 
When ]^IcClellan had the army of the 
Potomac, and he w^as not doing anything 
only parading and drilling the army, Lin- 
coln sent word to him, "If you are not 
going to do anything with the army, I 
would like to borrow it a while."' That 
just reminds me of a great many profess- 
ed followers of Our Lord Jesus Christ ; 
the Captain of our salvation has a fight- 
ing army, and while some would stand 
still, the great Bishop of our souls says, 
"Speak to the children of Israel that they 
go forward" — and that does not mean to 
stand and mark time, either. You know 
there are a great many people, when the 
Captain of our salvation says, "Speak to 
the children of Israel that they go for- 
ward," they just mark time, and they 
never get anywhere. Friends, I believe 
that our duty is on the firing line. I like 
the smell of gunpowder sometimes. I 
never like to hear roars, but I like the 
smell of gunpowder. 

This seems to be a kind of a reminis- 
cent meeting, and I do not know that I 
have anything better to tell than my ex- 
perience. I want to say how much I 
owe to the speakers who have preceded 
me. Brother Stoddard was the first one 
that started me out in definite anti-secrecy 
work. I was attending the Boston School 
of Theology, and he had a quiet way of 
going around and giving a kind and 
sympathetic shake of the hand, and un- 
obtrusively slipping some tracts into my 
hand : and actually he got me to be a 



kind of lieutenant for him in the theologi- 
cal school. Well, I have never laid it 
up against him, and I am glad to meet 
him to-day, and I have always had a kind 
feeling toward that dear old brother, or 
father, and I hope he has been going 
up there to the theological school ever 
since. I remember some experiences I 
had while there. I applied for a charge 
while I was in the theological school. I 
worked myself through three higher 
schools in order to preach for the Meth- 
odist church. I had eleven years' work 
in the higher schools, and it was not 
wonderful that I was a skeleton, weigh- 
ing 165 pounds when I came out; it was 
liarder than the lodge has been, I never 
could get a charge while I was in the 
theological school. Time and again I 
would apply, and they would go and see 
the professor, and I suppose I must have 
been a bad one, I cannot account for it 
in any other way ; the people talked as 
if they certainly liked me ; there might 
have been people who would talk one 
vray and act another, or would talk one 
way to one person and another way to 
another ; but they seemed to relish it 
when I went out to preach for them, 
and sometimes they asked, '■\\'hy don't 
you send that man Pegram to preach?" 
but I never could get a charge^there 
was a strong college fraternity, that 
boasted, boasted, that all the .good ap- 
pointments belonged to their boys I That 
just reminds me, I recommended one 
brother to go out to Xorwood to get the 
secretaryship of the Y. ]\I. C. A. there, 
and he told me he went out and went to 
the lodge the first night and attended a 
banquet to get a pull. 

By the way. I do not suppose Sister 
Smith remembers me, but at the L^rbana 
camp meeting, L^rbana, Ohio, she talked 
on the Gospel of John, 17th chapter, at 
a time when I was going through some 
of the fights I had. She came to the 
point, "Father, keep through Thy name 
tliose whom Thou hast given to me," and 
she said, "That is it ; I have been talking 
of keeping myself: He is to keep me." 
Thank the Lord, that is what I do now. 
We are always talking about keeping our 
religion, it is to keep us : we are not 
to keep God, God is to keep us. It re- 



7S 



OHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1907, 



minds me of that figure of the Christ over 
the Y. M. C. A, building in Boston, with 
a hand holding it, and over it, '1 hold 
and am held." Some of the college stu- 
dents here, sometimes when you are ex- 
perimenting with electricity, you get hold 
of the handles, and it gets hold of you 
— you have had the experience. 

I ask, "Have you got hold of Christ 
aright, and have you got hold of the 
truth aright? If so, it wiU hold you. Do 
we hold our convictions of the truth so 
that we cannot get away from them? 
Galileo, when he was released from 
prison, stamped his foot upon the earth 
and said, ''The world moves anyway, the 
world does move." Brethren, that is an 
idea for us ; in spite of what the people 
of the world tell us to-day, that it does 
not move, we can say, in the name of 
God who has commanded it to move, 
''The world does move." 

I do not know whether any of you have 
ever been up in the Elkhorn region of 
West Virginia, one of the worst places 
in the world. Nearly every country of 
Europe and some other countries, and 
nearly every State in this Nation, is rep- 
resented there. I was sent up there on 
my first charge after I graduated from 
college, inexperienced, unsophisticated ; 
when I told my people at home that I 
was going up into the Elkhorn region, 
they looked at me in blank amazement, 
and wondered if that was the last time 
that they would lay their eyes upon me. 
Thirteen men were shot in one night 
within a stone's throw of my church, five 
of them killed outright. The presiding 
elder said, 'T do not believe in Secret 
Societies ; I am glad that you do not ; I 
hope you never will join." Presiding 
elders can give advice; that we all know 
— "When you^go up there be careful, be 
very careful." It is very wise to be able 
to say something without saying any- 
thing. Why, it takes a lawyer to do that 
business ! *'Be very careful not to say 
anything about the Lodge, because that 
is a mission charge, that is a new coun- 
try, and it will injure your influence and 
injure your church, and might destroy 
the v/ork," etc. I went up there. Oh, 
the glorious times I used to have, going 
out on the mountains to pray, when 



Heaven would ''come down my soul to 
greet, while glory crowned the mercy- 
seat." I would go down there to fight 
the battles, where one's life was in dan- 
ger. Why, some of the ministers up 
there went armed. I went armed in the 
might of Israel's God. I was astonished 
at the very first prayer meeting to find 
every member of the church except one 
good old man, had gone to the lodge in- 
stead of the prayer meeting. I had the 
preacher and that old man and some 
women and little children and one or two 
people from another church, at the prayer 
meeting. It was not a Methodist prayer 
meeting, but it was a prayer meeting. 
It was supposed to be a Methodist prayer 
meeting; that is what I called it out of 
courtesy to the Methodist Episcopal 
church ; but it was more of an outsider's 
prayer meeting. I told my presiding eld- 
er it was a Methodist prayer meeting. 
I did not know any better, where I was 
reared, than when prayer meeting night 
came to trudge along through the mud 
until I got there, and I thought every 
other Methodist was- just like me; I was 
astonished to find that folks were differ- 
ent from what I was in that point. I 
have walked several miles, after hard 
work all day, just to be at a good old- 
fashioned prayer meeting. When I found 
my members, over whom God had set 
me as a watch, going to the lodge in- 
stead of to the prayer meeting, I won- 
dered what I ought to say; but the pre- 
siding elder said I must be careful, very 
careful, exceedingly careful. They did 
the same thing the next week and the 
next week. Brethren, the point I am 
getting at is this : the presiding elder said 
I must not speak out; God's Word said 
I must. I came to that place where I was 
neglecting my duty, and was not realiz- 
ing it either ; and when I went out on the 
mountain to pray, just as Moses did, just 
as Jesus did when He was here; the 
time came when I did not pray, did not 
have the glorious times I had formerly. 
When I would get down to pray I would 
nicely fold my hands and close my eyes, 
to make it just as sacred and reverent 
and earnest as possible; but the thing- 
would not go, I would try it again and 
wake up from my reverie, and would be- 



Jul3^ 1901 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



79 



gin all over by thanking the Lord. I 
nearly always got just about through 
thanking the Lord — the Lord would let 
me do that, but I was not doing what He 
wanted rrie to do, and He wanted me to 
keep my mouth shut about the rest, and 
so I could get about two or three sen- 
tences of thanking the Lord, and I never 
could get any farther. I would nerve 
myself up and begin, and I would thank 
the Lord over again, to give me a new 
start you know, and v/hen I would come 
to that jumping-ofif point I would just 
stop, and I would say to myself, "Prob- 
ably I would better go at it systemati- 
cally; first, I will pray for myself, and 
then for the official board (sometimes 
they need it), and then 1 will pray for 
the Sunday school and the Epworth 
League, and the penitents and the new 
converts" ; and so I began, and I thanked 
the Lord again, and then I would begin 
to pray, but I did not pray ; and I went 
through with that day after day for sev- 
eral weeks, and finally I wondered if I 
was losing my Christian experience, or 
if I had stepped over the dead line, com- 
mitted the unpardonable, sin, or had 
sinned against the Holy Ghost, and I 
asked the Lord what was the matter, and 
the Lord began to burn into my heart 
and conscience the necessity of my speak- 
ing against the Lodge, and warning 
against the Lodge. But the presiding 
elder said I must not. And tHen my life 
was in danger; at that time I was in 
rather a dilapidated condition from nerv- 
ous prostration, and a bigger man than 
Brother Groen or myself stood before me 
and said, *'If you preach such things you 
will lose your head — he had killed two 
men, and I did not know whether I would 
be the third or not. I felt that it was 
not wise to provoke him unnecessarily. 
I said what I said very easily ; I observed 
the presiding elder's advice to be very 
careful. Well, that burden grew on me, 
and it grew more and more, and I would 
try to pray more and more, but I would 
say, ''1 have to be careful what I say 
on that subject, and I am going to be 
exceedingly careful about everything 
else; I am going to study the Bible, I 
am going to pray more, I will visit more, 
I will try to preach better." But the 



Lord held me to that point. Brethren, it 
is one point that represents the con- 
troversy between us and God, and when 
we yield the one point, that represents 
our will. Don't you see it? That one 
point represented my will toward God. 
I did the other things because it pleased 
me to do them, and I did not do that one 
thing because it did not please me ; and 
I struggled over that day after day, and 
week after week, until my distress be- 
came so great that, as David said, "It 
was as fire shut up in my bones." If any 
of you have had the experience of deep 
conviction on account of some wrong or 
some duty, so that it seemed that your 
whole being was on fire, you know "that 
was my experience. Brethren, I never 
had the headache, and I did not have 
it then ; but my head would wool-gather, 
my head and brain were hot, and my 
scalp was dry, so that my hair stood up 
and I could not get it to lie down. You 
don't know the struggle that people 
sometimes have to go through when they 
try to be true to God. That was not all. 
I came to the place where I made a 
promise of everything else that I would 
do for the Lord except the one thing. 
The burden became greater, the battle 
harder between me and God, until finally 
it seemed that I was standing on the 
verge of the bottomless pit, and if I did 
not yield I would topple in; and at last 
I said, "Lord, I will do it, if I do lose 
my head"; but I said to myself, "Now 
I am still going to keep the presiding 
elder's advice — I have got beyond the 
point where I am looking to the presiding 
elder's advice — I am now going to be 
very careful, and work out a real nice, 
gentle, polished, refined, sympathetic, 
pathetic sermon on the Lodge, that won't 
hurt anybody" — as if you could hit the 
Saloon or Lodge and give it a black eye 
without hurting it! I was young and 
green, and did not know any better, but 
I thought I could do it. I found peace 
in my soul, praise the Lord. I had been 
collecting a church debt. They threat- 
ened to sell the church under a mortgage, 
and I said, "I will have to collect this," 
because I was loyal to the church, and 
did not want it sold. I collecte<l that 
debt, and got it paid, and I came to Sun- 










-JJgr 



July. 1901 



CHKI«T1AN Ci^NOSUKE. 



81 



I can get happy on the Lodge Question, 
and I suppose that is the reason that 
young men will get up and confess Christ 
and start for heaven, when you are 
preaching on the Lodge. Why not, if it 
is right? God has said that we are to 
declare the Word, and it is not for us 
to question the will of God. Tennyson 
wrote of that noble six hundred : 

"Theirs not to make reply, 

Theirs not to reason why, 

Theirs but to do and die. 

Into the valley of death 
Itode the six hundred." 

And their fame has come down 
through the ages, in history and in 
poetry, and art will commemorate their 
fidelity to their country, and their king. 
Our King is g-reater, and why cannot we 
be just as true as they, to better prin- 
ciples, to a better King, to a more glori- 
ous inheritance than the noble six hun- 
dred will ever have. 

I am glad for the privilege of speaking 
to you, and of hearing these dear old 
fathers. It encourages me to be here. 
Sometimes when I feel that I am stand- 
ing alone, and it seems that my life will 
be spoiled in spite of all the sacrifice that 
I have made to serve my church and 
the world, and it seems the door is clos- 
ed, and the whole thing will collapse, I 
say, "Thank God, there are others "who 
can sympathize with me." Thank the 
Lord, who can keep me happy, gloriously 
happy, and keep the fire of heavenly love 
burning in my soul, while the fire of hell 
is without. Oh, praise the Lord for the 
salvation that saves, and keeps us glori- 
ously under such circumstances. 



The martyr-fires are found along the 
straight and narrow way that leads unto 
life eternal. The devil has freed the 
broad road of all such illumination. Men 
who travel that way have no principles 
that are worth dying for. 



If in the desert of life we look for 
our palm trees and w^ells of water, should 
we not also expect a sandy waste and a 
bitter fountain now and then? 



DELUSIVE TEACHING IN PRESENT- 
DAY PREACHING. 

BY KEV. WILLIAM EVANS, D. D. 
Address at National Convention, Friday After- 
noon, .Tune 14tii. 

We are told that in the last da}s some 
shall depart from the faith. I am not 
here to discuss the question whether these 
are the last days or not. I have my own 
personal views about these things. But 
of this I am absolutely sure, that whether 
these be the last davs or not, manv are 




Heaven has no smiles for the man who 
mopes. 



WILLIAM EVANS. 

departing from the faith. Of that we are 
sure, and therefore it is our duty to draw 
attention to these things. We must see 
to it that fundamentals are the principal 
things. Essentials are the things to be 
emphasized ; and there are certain per- 
verse tendencies in modern preaching 
which we need to recognize. 

Perverse Tendencies with Regard to the 
Bible. 

First of all, there are the perverse ten- 
dencies with regard to the Bible. A man's 
views of the Bible determine his views 
of Christ. Tell me what a man be- 
lieves about the New Testament, and I 



82 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 190-; 



will tell you at once what that man be- 
lieves about Christ. If he has a limited 
view of inspiration, he has a limited view 
of Christ, for the New Testament is par- 
ticularly the book of Christ. If you take 
the Old Testament and put it in the fire ; 
if you g-o the wide world over (saying- 
two or three lines in Josephus and Taci- 
tus),, where can you find a scrap of writ- 
ing or history or narrative anywhere 
about Christ, except in the New Testa- 
ment? The New Testament is the very 
book of Christ. Christ is its beginning, 
as Christ is its end. The very moment I 
can see that a man is beginning to let up 
on the inspiration of the New Testament, 
it is time to feel around and see if that 
man is not beginning to let up on 
the doctrine of Christ. It is a 
pretty safe assertion, that your at- 
titude towards the Bible, and especially 
towards the New Testament, is your at- 
titude towards Christ. 

The Bible should mean no less 
to the Christian than it did to Christ? 
Should the Bible mean any less to the 
Church than it meant to the Church's 
Master ? Is it not true that what is indis- 
pensable to the Redeemer is absolutely in- 
dispensable to the redeemed ? Now then, 
what was Christ's estimate of the Bible? 
What things did He esteem essential and 
necessary? They can be no less essen- 
tial and no less necessary for me. I be- 
lieve that the whole Bible is equally 
inspired; for these men wrote not of 
themselves, but the same Holy Spirit that 
penned Matthew penned Romans. These 
are not the w^ords of men, but the words 
of the Holy Spirit. I do not know that 
I am very fond of the terms Johannine 
iind Petrine theology. I do not know 
but that they have dangerous tendencies. 
It is the theology of the Holy Ghost that 
we want to recognise. Now you read 
through your Bible and see how Jesus 
Christ handled the Scriptures. Did He 
appeal to them as ultimate authority, or 
did He not? Did He not say, again and 
again, 'Thus saith the Scriptures"? Did 
He not appeal to them as the ultimate rule 
of faith and practice? Did He not gov- 
ern His own life by them ? Did He not say 
distinctly and definitely that the Scrip- 
tures were of God, that they were the 



Word of God? The Scripture could not 
be broken; it could not pass away. It 
spoke of Him, it was related to Him, it 
pointed to Him. I say again, the Bible 
can mean no less to me than it meant to 
my Master; and it can mean no less to 
the Church than it meant to the Church's 
Master. 

Now it is wonderful, is it not, how the 
critics are telling us that Moses did not 
write the Pentateuch? Of course, Jesus 
said he did, but the critics say he did 
not. They take, for instance, the story of 
Jonah: "It is not historic;" therefore it 
is thrown overboard. There is the story 
of Sodom and Gomorrah, of Lot's wife,, 
the story of the garden of Eden, the story 
of the fall ; these are being tossed out as 
uninspired and secondary, as unprofitable. 
But is it not remarkable that every one 
of these things that the critics throw out 
are just the very things that Jesus Christ 
put His stamp on when He was here? 
''As it was in the days before the flood" ; 
"Remember Lot's wife" ; "As Jonas was 
three days and three nights in the whale's 
belly, so shall the So^ of Man be three 
days and three nights in the heart of the 
earth" ; "Had ye believed Moses, ye 
would have believed me" ; "Beginning at 
Moses and all the prophets, He expound- 
ed unto them in all the Scriptures," etc. 
The very things which they say are not 
inspired are the very things that Jesus 
Christ said were inspired, and are the 
very things that He put His seal of ap- 
proval on. 

Now am I going to believe Christ, or 
am I going to believe the critics ? "Well," 
they say, "He did not know any better.'^ 
They quote very glibly the passage, "Of 
that day knoweth no man, no, not the 
angels which are in heaven, neither the 
Son, but the Father." While I am will- 
ing to concede a voluntary omitting of 
certain knowledge not necessary for 
revelation or redemption, nevertheless, 
when I come face to face with that propo- 
sition, I say, one of two or three things 
happens. Either Jesus Christ did not 
know any different, and spoke as though 
He did — if that is true, what be- 
comes of His omniscience? Then he did 
not know all things. If it was a delusion 
of the people that Moses wrote the Pen- 



July, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



S.3 



tateuch, and Christ coincided with that 
delusion, not knowing any better, or 
knowing it to be a dehision, supported it 
anyway, then what becomes of His truth ? 
Xow there is another view, and that is, 
that it was just as he said. And do you 
know that is the least difficult view to 
accept ? I think sometimes we fail to get 
hold of the greatest difficulties. Speak- 
ing about the difficulty of a whale swal- 
lowing Jonah — that is not the most 
miraculous thing in the book of Jonah. 
How a prophet could get away from the 
presence of God, is m^ore wonderful to 
me than that the whale swallowed Jonah. 
I find this m some present-day preach- 
ing, that the Bible is looked upon with 
suspicion as it enters the witness-stand. 
Xow I have no right to look with sus- 
picion upon its witness. If the Bible is 
admitted into the witness-stand to give 
its own testimony, it should at least be 
given credibility: it should at least be 
granted that it is honest in its statements ; 
and yet the average man, who holds it 
as a non-inspired book, takes up the Bible 
just as he listens to the testimony of a 
thief or a robber ; he is on his guard 
against it all the time, and he is steeling 
himself against any view that it may be 
inspired. I should listen to the Bible it- 
self, not to any criticism that has slopped 
over on the sacred page. I take 
the Bible, and in it I ,read. "All 
Scripture is given by inspiration of 
God." Xow I do not care whether you 
read from the authorized or revised ver- 
sion; I do not care whether you say "all 
Scripture," or ''every Scripture." If you 
say ''every Scripture," very well, I will 
take you to the context ; I will show you 
that the Scriptures that Paul is referring 
to is the entire Old Testament, the 
sacred writings. This book says that all 
Scripture is God-breathed. Let me go 
back; for instance, here is the garden of 
Eden, God making man; here is man 
formed of the dust of the ground; now 
what do you see lying there on the 
ground in the garden of Eden? A life- 
less form of clay, that is all. And now 
God breathes into that lifeless form ; and 
what does it become ? A living soul. Just 
inbreathed bv Deitv, that is man. 



is it not? Xow I come to this 
A\'ord. I find a human element in it; 
it is true they are human words, given 
through instrumentalities. We see each 
writer has his own way of expressing 
things, his idiosyncrasies, which are pe- 
culiar to each man; they are there; the 
human element is not obliterated; but 
there is God breathing into these men, 
directing, suggesting, revealing, con- 
trolling what they say, so that they are 
kept from recording error. You take 
that divine breathing out of the Bil^.e, 
and you have got pure literature, that is 
all. You take the Spirit of God out of 
man, and you have got just dust_, that is 
all. Dust inbreathed by Deity, that is 
man ; and this word inbreathed by Deit}' 
— that is inspiration — is the Bible ; and 
when you take that out of the Bible, you 
have nothing but an ordinary classic, or- 
dinary literature, that is all. 

W't have been seeing what the Bible 
says about itself, and furthermore, it says 
this — in the letter of Peter, he says, "The 
prophecy came not in old time by the 
will of man." You know there are some 
people who say that David sat down one 
day and said, "X'ow I am going to think 
of spiritual things ; I am going to medi- 
tate" ; and so he sat down, and 
meditated, and said, "The Lord is my 
shepherd''; and "The Lord is my light 
and my salvation" ; and while he was 
thinking of God, these thoughts came to 
him, just as they come to you, and he 
wrote them down. W't have the actual 
meditation of man; in other words, we 
have man's thoughts about God. That is 
their theory. But this verse in Peter 
teaches me that the Scripture came not 
in olden time by the will of man, but 
"holy men of God spake as they were 
moved by the Holy Ghost" ; and it is the 
present participle — they spake and wrote 
as they were being moved to do so by the 
Holy Ghost, as they were borne along, not 
at their own suggestion but at His. So if 
I am to take the Bible's own testimony as 
to its inspiration, I am told that it is God- 
breathed; that holy men of God did not 
write it of. themselves — they did not sit 
down and write it when they felt hke 
doing it, but the Holy Ghost moved them 



84 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July. 1907. 



to write it. That is the Bible's definition 
of inspiration. 

Xow you may speak of the Bible as 
literature, and I do not object to that, for 
it is literature to a certain point ; but be- 
yond that point — and how much lies be- 
_vond that point — it is the Father's love- 
letter to His child. 

An}- preaching- that disregards the ele- 
ment of inspiration is delusive feaehiiig. 
I am not now entering on the question as 
to any theories of inspiration, whether 
mechanical, partial or full. Personally, 
I am inclined to the full inspiration of 
the Scripture. This is the great truth, 
that these words were inspired of God. 

The Deity of Christ. 

Xow there is another element that pre- 
sents itself as fundamental in present-day 
preaching, and that is the deity of Christ. 
You know we used to speak sometime 
ago of the divinity of Christ, but we can- 
not do that any more ; we have to speak 
of the deity of Christ, for this reason : if 
}'0u are talking to a Christian Scientist, 
"for instance, or a Unitari?.n (for both 
stand on the same footing so far as this 
point is concerned) and you say to the 
Christian Scientist, "Do you believe that 
Jesus Christ is the Son of God?" He 
will answ^er, "Of course, we believe that 
Jesus Christ is the Son of God." I 
have been told that you do not believe in 
the divinity of Christ. ''Of course we 
believe in the divinity of Christ." You 
see, some unsophisticated Christians say 
these people are not so wrong after all. 
You believe in the divinity of Christ, 
you say. "Why, of course, I do." 
Well, but do you mean to say that 
you believe Jesus Christ was divine in 
1,^'e sense that nobody else is? "Oh, no." 
There is where you get him. He ^ays, 
"There is the divine in all of us, we all 
are the sons of God ; I believe in the uni- 
\ ei .' al fatherhood of God, and the luii- 
versal brotherhood of man." It is |:er- 
fcctly true that we are the sons of God mi 
the sense of creation, but oh, Jesus Christ 
was the Son of God in a sense that you 
anc^ I never can be sons of God. "To as 
man} as received him, to them gave He 
power to become the sons of God" — to 
hceGrne; He never became; He alwavs 



was, and I presume always will be, the 
Son of God. 

Now you know there is a popular the- 
ory to-day that Jesus Christ was a good 
man, the best man that ever lived, the 
ideal of humanity, the perfection of man- 
hood. Men are willing to place Him any- 
where except on the throne of Deity. I 
never have been able to recognize the 
claim of a good man. If I shoukl be sum- 
moned to appear in court to-morrow, and 
should take my oath on the Bible, and 
swore that I w^ould tell the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, 
God helping me ; and if then I should de- 
liberately turn around and swear falsely, 
what would the court do with me ? They 
would charge me with perjury, would they 
not? and they would send me to jail. And 
they ought to. And man who will lie 
under oath is not a good man, is he? 
Do you think he is? You read in the 
26th chapter of Matthew, and the parallel 
accounts in the other Gospels, where 
Christ is before the high priest. The 
high priest says, 'T adjure thee" — and 
that is putting a Jew "under oath — "I ad- 
jure thee by the living God." You know 
what that means to a Jew. A Jew will 
only pronounce the name of Jehovah once 
a year ; we have translated it on every 
page, we would just as soon say Jehovali 
as anything else ; we are losing our rev- 
erence. Caiaphas says, "I adjure thee 
by the living God, that thou tell us 
whether thou be the Christ, the Son of 
God?" And what does He answer? 
"Thou hast said." He said not only 
"Thou hast said," but "I am." Where is 
your "good man" theory? I never could 
see it. Unless Jesus Christ was the Son 
of the living God, He deliberately lied. 
He was either the most colossal fraud, 
or the most gigantic fact. He was 
the Son of God. Some people say that 
He never claimed to be the Son of God. 
What do you call that? Why did the 
Jews seek to kill Him? Because He had 
not only broken the Sabbath, but made 
Himself equal with God. You have to 
meet these claims ; therefore I say, any 
teaching that does not recognize in Jesus 
Christ, deity, is delusive teaching. 

I need not dwell on the fact of the 
humanity of Jesus, for that is em- 



July, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



8d 



phasized, and I think possibly over- 
emphasized to-day. It is the deity of 
Christ that we have to be particular 
about. Everything- else clusters around 
that truth. Church polity, modes of bap- 
tism, and a hundred other things can fall, 
but the doctrine of Christ must stand. 
You know there are some conservative 
Clitics who tell us that the Bible can be 
put aside altogether without the deity c^f 
Christ being affected. I am not saying 
whether that is right or wrong. ''Deny 
the Gospels ; prove them to be spurious ; 
that would not make any difference ; the 
liistoric Christ still stands, and the deity 
of Jesus is not dependent upon the Ctqs- 
]:>els." That is what they tell us. Per- 
sonally, I do not believe that. Deny llie 
deity of Jesus, and you have no testi- 
mony. There is no church that 
can be called a church ; there is 
nothing that can attach the name 
Christian to it, that does not hold to the 
deity of our Lord and Savior, Jesus 
Christ. And when it comes to evangelis- 
tic movements, and church federation, 
the deity of Jesus Christ should be the 
central gathering point. 

Delusive Teaching with Regard to the 
Atonement. 

There is one more point I want to 
speak of, and then I am through. That 
is the delusive teaching with regard to 
the atonement. The atonement is not 
popular to-day. People don't like the 
word blood. They say it savors too much 
of the> slaughter-house and it makes a 
person shiver. They don't like the thought 
of blood. And sometimes preachers are 
cowards, and they let it go. Some peo- 
ple say, "Why can't we translate the word 
blood; chang'e it and put the word 'love' 
in its place?" I am persuaded of this, 
l!ial when it comes to defining the terms 
of salvation you have to be very much 
more accurate than you do in making a 
contract. Words must be used that have 
no ambiguity. Suppose you were to take 
the word love and put it in the place of 
blood. Love might mean thirty or forty 
or fifty different things — affection, 
friendship, different degrees of friend- 
ship, benevolence, charity. If you 
are going to define the terms of 
salvation by the word love, do you 



see where you are? But you take 
the word blood, in an\- language ; what 
does it mean ':" It means blood, doesn't 
it? It means nothing else. And that is 
the reason why the Scripture says^ 
"Without shedding of blood is no re- 
mission of sins." Xow, then, when the 
death of Christ is presented in modern 
preaching, it sliould be presented is a 
substitutionary death, a vicarious death ; 
that is, death in the stead of somebody 
else. We take the teachings of Christ 
al30ut His life, about His death, and put 
them all together. Take, for instance, 
just this illustration, the words of die 
Lord at the institution of the Lord's Sup- 
per. "Take, drink, this cup is the Xew 
Testament in my blood, shed for \ou, 
and for many for the remission of sins." 
Some people say, 'Tt is a lie ; it was not 
shed for the remission of sins." Xow 
3^ou have to believe either the words of 
Jesus or the words of the critics. I have 
come face to face with this : "The Son of 
Man came not to be ministered unto, i^ut 
to minister, and to give his life a ran- 
som for many." A ransom means a pur- 
chase price, the price of redemption. 
"Himself bare our sins in His own body 
on the tree." What is the critic gomg 
to do with the 53d chapter of Isaiah? 
Critic as he is, he tells us that it refers 
to Christ. What are you going to da 
with these words : "He was wounded for 
our transgressions, he was bruised for 
our iniquities ; the chastisement of our 
peace was upon Him; and with His 
stripes we are healed. All we like sheep 
have gone astray ; we have turned every 
one to his o\yn way, and the Lord hath 
laid on Him the iniquit}' of us all"? 

People tell us that Jesus Christ suf- 
fered to show us how much He loved us ; 
that His death was an example. 
That has always seemed very fool- 
ish to me, for this reason : Suppose 
I am standing on the deck of a steamer, 
and I see a mother playing with a child 
in her arms. I come along, and say to the 
mother, "That is a beautiful child vou 
have there : I love that baby so 
nmch I could jump into the ocean 
and drown myself for it, and I will do it 
to show you how much I love the babv." 
And into the ocean I jump and drown 



SG 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1907. 



myself. Is that g-reat and beautiful? The 
person who would do so is a fool. Do 
you tell nie that God let his Son die that 
?.wful death, and that Jesus Christ died, 
just to show how much He loved us? 
You do not have to tell me that ; I do not 
need the death of Jesus Christ to show 
that God loved me ; people in the Old 
Testament knew that, before Christ came, 
and that brutal, bloody cross is not need- 
ed to show me that God loved me. 

Then there are some people who sav 
thc-t Jesus Christ suftered zvith us. That 
is getting a little nearer, but it is not 
enough. If I am sent to jail for some- 
thing, and you come to me and 
say, "1 think a great deal of you ; I am 
sorry that you are in this place ; I want 
to show you my friendship and my love, 
and so I will go to jail with you, and I 
will work on the stone-pile with you, by 
3^our side." Does that relieve my punish- 
!r-ent any ? What I want is to have some- 
body go to jail in my place, and let me 
go free; that is what I need. And this 
is my theory of the death of Jesus; He 
took my place. I stand where Barrabas 
stood on the crucifixion day, and see 
Ciirist on the cross that was made for 
me, where I should have been crucified. 
When I see the Son of God suspended 
between heaven and earth, I want to 
stand where Barabbas stood on the day 
of crucifixion, and say, 'T should have 
been there ; that cross was made for me." 
I do not understand the atonement. I 
suppose one of the best books is Denny 
on the Theory of the Atonement. I 
have read fifty theories of the atonement, 
and I never felt satisfied with any one of 
them, except Christ's. I am glad that I 
am not saved by any theory of the atone- 
ment; I do not understand it. A child 
doe^ not have to wait until he understands 
his mother's love, in order to appreciate 
and enjoy it. If he did, then he never 
would appreciate it, he never would en- 
joy it. If my boy must Avait until he un- 
derstands me before he knows and can 
ieej my loving interest in liim, then my 
boy will never know it, for he will never 
understand me. And I do not have to 
understand the Christ. When Jesus .^aid, 
*'My God, my God, why hast Thou for- 
saken me?" — if He said 'Why?" then I 



do not need to be surprised if I cannot 
understand His atonement ; but I believe 
it. 

There was a display of wax fig- 
ures in Seiger, Cooper's, I think it 
was, some years ago — of Christ be- 
fore Pilate ; and I remember go- 
ing to look at that exhibit. There were 
a number of people gathered around the 
great table of life-size wax figures. There 
sat Pilate on the throne ; there stood 
Christ with hands tied behind him ; there 
stood the howling Jews, and the false wit- 
nesses. I will never forget the impression 
that scene made on my mind. I was so 
o\ercome that I turned to a man beside 
me, and said, ''What is He to you?" He 
looked at me as though he thought I was 
speaking in an unknown tongue. He said, 
"What is He to you ?" I turned away, I 
do not know what he thought; I have 
never met the man since; but I shall 
never forget how I felt, looking at that 
Christ. 

"Bearing shame and scoffing rude, 
In my place condemned He stood, 

Sealed my pardon with His blood. 
Hallelujah, what a Savior !" 

That is the Gospel to preach ; that is the 
atonement that men need to-day ; and it is 
the only theory of the Christ that will . 
save lost and ruined sinners. 



SHERMAN CHURCHES ARE PECULIAR. 

The Odd Fellows' lodge of Sherman 
were invited to the Universalist church 
to hear a sermon in commemoration of 
the 88th anniversary of their order. 

The pastor of the church preached an 
inspiring sermon. It was calculated to 
be a union service — but where were the 
Methodists, the Baptists and the Pres- 
byterians? They were conspicuous by 
their absence. The Methodist minister, 
although expected, did not appear and 
the trustees of the other two churches 
passed resolutions forbidding the pastors 
to assist. Where was the spirit of Odd 
Fellowship manifested? The three mys- 
tic links of the order, "Friendship, 
Brotherly Love, and Truth," were for- 
gotten in the narrow adherence to creed. 
— Mayville (N. Y.) Sentinel. 



July, 1907. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 87 

TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT. Phillips, up to April 30, 1907, inclusive. 

From May i, 1906, to April 30, 1907- and find that they are correctly kept, and 

RESOURCES., that there are vouchers for all expendi- 

Real Estate tures ; the vouchers and footings of the 

Carpenter Building $15,000.00 cash book having been examined by VV. 

Minnesota 1,200.00 B. Rose, at request of the Finance Com- 

Bills Receivable mittee. We also find that securities are 

General fund '. 6,355.00 on hand as stated in the annual report 

Merchandise on hand— coal, of the Treasurer. 

etc 73-71 We have also examined the report of 

Subscriptions due on Cynosure 210.60 Vv'm. H. Fischer, Trustee of Annuity 

Cynosure inventory 2,000.00 Funds, and find the same to be correct 

Books in stock 874.29 and in accordance with the books of the 

W. H. Fischer, trustee of An- Treasurer. 

nuity funds 8,880.00 E. Whipple, 

Fixtures 349-^^ H. A. Fischer, 

Publishing material ,. 785-^^ Auditors. 

Reference library 296.95 . 

Tracts in stock 451^-4^ /-r^Nix/cxT'nr.M i c-t'tcoc 

Martin land contract 1,859.68 .?'^'^^.''T1''^ LETTERS. 

Dawson farm interest ...... 5,000.00 ^ ^ Morenci, Mich May 23, 1907. 

Postage stamps on hand 22.S^o R^P/y/^g- to your highly appreciated 

Personal accounts due 250.55 ^^^'^^ ^^^^^ ?? ^^ ?^^^^ °^ °"^. ^^ ^^^ 

, . most respectable reform associations on 

$4-^ 610.6^ earth, I would say that it would be high- 
Cash on hand, May i, 1907.$ '329*57 ^^ gratifying to me to meet with you in 

your annual gathering at Wheaton and 

$4^,040.22 exchange greetings with the precious la- 

Li\BiLiTiES borers in this holy cause, some of whom 

Annuities ^ have met on the field of conflict in the 

Caowell $ 96.24 ^^ys of former years and learned to ap- 

gj^-^l^ 200.00 preciate — such as Stoddard, the Blanch- 

Tohnson 100.00 ards, Bernard, Rollins, Rathbun, Leving- 

qI^Iq 1,000.00 ton, Joseph Cook, and others "whose 

New York * 1,260.00 names are in the Lamb's book of life.'' 

Michigan 300.00 I cannot think with pleasure of the 

Woodward 50.00 old man at L , Conrad V., scream- 
Sundry Funds— ing at J. P. Stoddard, after the latter's 
Ohio Endowment $ 1,160.00 profound lecture on the Master's De- 
Pennsylvania Endowment . 100.00 gree: "If you will go to a place that I 

Milton Endowment 1,278.52 shall name and lecture as you have done 

Chicago Theological Semi- here, and come ^ away with your head 

nary 1 1.20 on, I have a hundred dollars in my pocket 

Cynosure Extension 20.39 to give you." This gave the crowd a 

Personal accounts payable .... 270.32 fine view of the blood in a Master Ma- 
Cynosure subscriptions paid in son's eye. Was he in love with the Bible 

advance 982.50 they parade? His Lutheran pastor was 

Capital account 37^11 1-05 also there, and also snarled at our fine 

lecturer. But I refrain from asking you 

$43,940.22 to think of the awful calamity which 

REPORT OF AUDITORS. camc Suddenly upon the pastor. "Ven- 

To the National Christian Association: geance is mine . . . saith the Lord." 

The undersigned, Auditors of the Na- May it please every reader of these 

tional Christian Association, have exam- lines to join with me in daily prayer that 

ined the books of your Treasurer, W. L God may be pleased to take speedy ven- 



ss 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1907. 



^eance on every blasphemous associa- 
tion. Amen. So let it be. 

(Rev.) J. K. Alwood. 



Stahl. Mo., May 25, 1907. 

I would be truly glad to meet with you 
all at W'heaton in the annual meeting- of 
the National Christian Association, op- 
posed to secret societies — or Baalism, 
Paganism — under different names, which 
change of names has ]io power to change 
the spirit or corrupting work among the 
nations ; and surely we must be living in 
the day of the deceptive working power 
of the three unclean spirits like frogs 
which John saw come out of the mouth 
of the dragon — beast — and false prophet 
— to deceive the kings and nations of the 
earth, to gather them together to the 
great battle (Rev. 16:13-14). When I 
see over three hundred clannish divisions 
here in x\merica (to say nothing of the 
world at large) I wonder how long God 
w^ill forbear and suffer such wickedness 
to reign till in His wrath He will pour 
out the whirlwind of His indignation. 
But the faithful can only cry aloud and 
spare not, like Jeremiah, whether they 
hear or refuse to hear. 

The Lord bless and comfort you all 
with a double portion of Jehu's and Jo- 
siah's might in your great battle, against 
all forms of Baalism, remembering that 
God alone can deliver you from the 
w^rath of such corrupting power. Let 
love abound among you ; see that ye love 
one another ; loving God with a pure 
heart fervently and one another as dear 
brethren. (Eld.) A. B. Lipp. 



Worcester, Mass., May 23, 1907. 
1 would be glad to be present at the 
-annual meeting for both the meeting and 
Wheaton College have attractions for 
me. Only yesterday in Boston at the 
"home of Rev. James P. Stoddard, we 
were talking of his contemplated trip to 
the meeting. I said I wished *I could 
attend. I still believe in the work of 
the National Christian Association. I 
have testified as to what my convictions 
were, over New England, and have been 
made to feel the cost of having such 
convictions and having the courage to 
speak theJi^ I certainly believe that 



any one who has convictions as to secret 
societies should speak out at any cost. In 
my lecture I have spoken my convictions 
as to how^ detrimental to the church was 
the lodge. Nowhere have I found lodg- 
ery as strong as in New England. This 
my home city is honeycombed with them. 
Of course, one needs ever to remember to 
be w^ise, with Heaven's wisdom, in this 
work. 

Now wishing and praying for God's 
blessings upon the coming meeting and 
all who may attend, I remain as ever, 
Your brother, (Rev.) N. W. Deveneau. 



Boston, June 7, 1907. 
Permit me to extend greetings to the 
National Convention to be held in Whea- 
ton, 111., the 13th and 14th inst., by the 
friends of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation. The cause which calls you to- 
gether is great above all measure. Like 
Samson in the temple of Dagon, you are 
to seize the pillars on which the temple 
of secrecy rests and overthrow this gi- 
gantic structure which Satan has prompt- 
ed men to set up in this land. The 
weapons of your warfare are not carnal, 
but mighty through God to the pulling 
down of strongholds. As the walls of 
Jericho fell when Israel had marched 
about them and sounded the ram's horns 
as God had indicated : so the secret lodge 
system will fall when you have sounded 
out the divinely appointed testimony 
against it. "And they overcame by the 
blood of the Lamb and by the word of 
their testimony." It is God's appointe-d 
way, to bring' victory out of seeming de- 
feat. Gustavus Adolphus fell on th^ 
field of Lutzen, but the Protestants broke 
the power of the Roman Catholic League 
and made the "Peace of Westphalia pos- 
sible," because 10,000 Swedes, that pene- 
trated the enemy's line as far as human 
power could go, stood there cutting down 
their foes until the last Swede had fal- 
len. The good soldiers of the cross of 
Christ in this convention may all fall in 
battle without seeing the lines of Satan's 
army broken ; but the victory of your 
faith is certain. Your earnest, cour- 
ageous, persistent, martyr-spirit causes 
trembling- in the ranks of these aliens. 
"God said, my people I will bring again 



July, iiXJI 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



89 



from Bashan hill ; yea, from the sea's 
devouring depths, them bring- again I 
will." (Rev.) J. M. Foster.* 



Muskegon, Mich., June ii, 1907. 
I am very sorry that it is positively im- 
possible for me to attend the annual 
meeting this week. Long before the 
date of meeting was known to me ar- 
rangements had been made that cannot 
well be changed. I would gladly have 
attended the meeting, for it was a course 
of pleasure and profit to me last year. 
But present or not please consider me 
with my church (Muskegon, Fourth 
Christian Reformed) anti-secret society. 
Please greet the brethren for me and 
believingly expect the divine blessing 
upon meeting and society. I inclose a 
dollar to aid the work. 

(Rev.) John W. Brink. 



Lockport, 111., June 11, 1907. 

It would be a great pleasure to me to 
meet with you in your annual gather- 
ing, and hear the words of encourage- 
ment given by the brave veterans of the 
conflict, before they are transferred 
across the river to the bannered hosts of 
the redeemed. 

The pressure of duties upon me here 
and the necessity of my being away to 
the trustee meeting and college com- 
mencement of next week, seem to require 
that I leave my accustomed seat vacant 
at your meeting this year. 

(Rev.) L. N. Stratton. 



Fort Scott, Kan., June 7, 1907. 
I long to be with you and meet the 
dear loved friends in convention. I have 
not been able to leave home or labor for 
the past four years. My heart is with 
you. I know and feel that all that has 
been said or done by reformers against 
the scourge of secret societies is true 
and the half- has not been told. Look at 
Boise ! and still the work of death and 
destruction goes on in secret orders. I 
wish I had a thousand lives to give and 
devote in the gospel as against the "anti- 
Christ." May the blessings and pres- 
ence of God rest upon you and lead in 
the vindication of truth. 

J. A. Richards. 



Pasadena, Cal., May 28, 1907. 

liow I would like to be with you at 
the coming N. 'C. A. meeting, and look 
into the faces of the dear, staunch friends 
of Christ and his church. 

Here on the Pacific Coast there is too 
much agreement between the followers 
of "light" and "darkness." May it soon 
change for the better. Greet Dr. Blanch- 
ard and all the friends. God bless the 
N. C. A. (Rev.) J. C. Brodfuhrer. 



Belle Center, O., Alav 



1907, 



I would be glad to attend your con- 
tention, but cannot at present. Am in 
sympathy with the anti-secret cause. I 
do not think church members should 
vote or help vote them into office. I for 
ont do not. God bless you in your labor 
for the cause of the Master. 

T. W. Stewart. 



Walden College, McPherson, Kan., ,^Iay 
26, 1907. 
It would be a great pleasure to me to 
be able to take in the offered opportuni- 
ties in information and inspiration to be 
given at your conference in Wheaton. 
But it seems to be impossible. I am en- 
gaged in a lecture course for the first 
h'cill of June in Minnesota and prepar- 
ing for an extended trip to Sweden early 
in July. Wishing you God's giea,test 
blessing upon vour doings, 

(Pres.) D. XyvalL 



Roxbury, O., May 24, 1907. 
I cannot attend the convention at 
Wheaton. I hope you will have a good 
convention and wish the National Chris- 
tian Association success. I believe secret 
orders are wrong and the people need to 
be enlightened in regard to the evils oi 
tliem. (Miss) Jessie E. Rarden.. 



Amboy, 111., June 12. 1907. 
By to-morrow you will be in annual 
session, at which time I hoped, ever 
.--ince the announcement, I could be witli 
you to enjoy the presence of God's noble 
Christian workers, who have taken such 
a grand stand against the greatest evil of 
the present day, viz., the Secret Lodge 
Sxstem. But my health does not pennit 
me ^o leave home. ]\la\ i'jod bless von 



00 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1907. 



and g'lve you great success in your meet- 
ing. 

As ever, vour brother in Christ, 

(Rev.) C. Bender. 



Oak Park, 111., June i, 1907. 
?\Jy Dear Sir — 

T thank you for the invitation to at- 
tend the Wheaton meetings. I am sorry 
that I must be in Dakota on the days 
Sf^t for the meetings, and shall be unable 
to be there. Cordiallv yours, 

(Rev.) W. E. Barton. 



Chicago, May 27, 1907. 
I am sorry to say that I cannot at- 
tend the annual meeting of the N. C. A. 
in AM">eaton this coming month. 

I leave for Michigan on the 5th of 
June and will not return until July 5tb. 
May the Lord bless the good work and 
cause it to prosper. 

(Rev.) B. H. Einink. 



The editor of The Free Methodist 
writes : 

Chicago, May 27, 1907. 

Thank you for the kindly invitation to 
attend the annual convention of the Ns.- 
tional Christian Association. In view of 
the nearness of our general conference 
and the increased labors on account 
thereof, I judge it will be impossible for 
me to com.ply with your request. I pray 
the Lord to give you a very profitable 
gathering, and also pray that the cause 
for which you so earnestly contend may 
continue to enjoy the blessing of the 
Lord, and that the coming convention 
may prove a stimulus to its onward prog- 
ress. 

Trusting you may have great pros- 
perity in your labor of love, I remain. 

Your brother in Jesus, 

C. B. Ebev. 



Columbus, O., May 27, 1907. 
I regret that I cannot meet with you ; 
niy prayers and my spirit will be with 
you, but One greater than I will be sure 
to be there, as it will be a gathering in 
His name. We know that the secret 
empire is against God, and that God is 
against it; and what He is against will 
eventually be overthrown. 



The lodge interferes with the admin- 
istration of justice, absorbs the hfe of 
the church, sets up a false religion, and 
a morality and a benevolence found- 
ed upon a false premise, and tends 
to destroy the conscience and obscure the 
moral vision. The enemy of all souls 
could not have devised a scheme fraught 
wiih more harm to the cause of Christ 
than the lodge system. It is calculated 
to deceive the very elect and lead the 
young and unwary from the paths of vir- 
tue and wisdom. Oh, that the church 
could see! Let us pray and work with a 
faith that will not falter — with God we 
are sure to win. Let us not grow weary 
in well doing. Great reforms work 
slowl\. A great shout will one day go 
up from the redeemed of the Lord, that 
the walls of sin and darkness are fallen, 
and that at last He who was the light of 
the world has come and rolled the mists 
away. 

Your brother in Christ. 

D. H. Harrington. 



I. Bennett Trout, editor of the Sunday 
School papers and quarterlies of the Ger- 
man Brethren Church, writes : 

Elgin, 111., June 11, 1907. 

It will not be possible for me to at- 
tend the annual meeting of the National 
Christian Association this year. I have 
juFt returned from a month's trip in Caii- 
fomia and cannot spare the time away 
from the office at present. I hope the 
meeting may be the most profitable one 
-vet held. I. B. Trout. 



Business manager of the Christian 
Witness and Advocate of Bible Holiness, 
writes : 

Chicago, May 28, 1907. 

As I cannot be at the annual meeting 
as I should like, permit me to say tiiat 
I am certainly greatly in sympathy with 
the work in which you are engaged, and 
am doing all I can to help in this work. 

God bless you and give you a blessed 
annual meeting. 

H. F. Kletzing. 



We were glad to hear from Mrs. Mary 
C. Baker, formerly office editor of the 
Free Methodist of Chicago; now editor 



Jill}-, 11X)7. 



CHRISTIAiN CYNOSURE. 



91 



cf "The Open Door;'' an official organ 
of the W. C. T. U. in Tennessee: 
Whittle Springs, Tenn., April 22, 1907. 

I would be very glad to attend the an- 
nual gathering in May, but the distance 
:s too far. I am in fullest accord with 
the principles of the N. C. A. I recog- 
nize the necessity of the association and 
believe it is doing vast good. May th^ 
Holy Spiiit make your gathering glorious 
witli Ilis presence and may great good 
be done thereby. (Mrs.) Mary C. Baker. 



Morning Sun, Iowa, June 11, 1907. 
I pray daily for the success of the 
work of the National Christian Associa- 
tion, but financially I am short of means. 
I rejoice to know of the convention. I 
pray th?.1 all may be enthused with the 
love of God "for there is none like unto 
our God who dwelleth on high" and 
'Tie is mighty to the pulling down of 
strongholds.'' (Mrs.) J. R. Johnson. 



The following is from Rev. Earnest 
Lee Thompson, pastor of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church at Stockton, 111., and 
brings the sad intelligence of his sick- 
ness. Bro. Thompson is a seceder, and 
a man who has the courage of his con- 
victions : 

Stockton, 111., x\pril 13, 1907. " 

I regret to tell you that my health }:-as 
failed me again and I have given up my 
public speaking and must avoid all ex- 
citement, at least for a long period. I 
wish I could come this year, but I shall 
have to refrain from doing so. I trust 
I bhall recover strength again and be 
able to do much in my calling yet before 
I go hence. (Rev.) E. L. Thompson. 



Northwood, Iowa, May 24, 1907. 
Your circular announcing the annual 
meeting of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation convention is at hand. I have been 
and am to-day intensely interested in the 
work of this association. I am sorry to 
say, as I often have said, that my work 
here in attending to five churches lays 
claim to all my time and strength, so that 
I cannot attend your meeting or other- 
wise work for the cause as I would like 
to. But I am with you in spirit and 
prayer and hope that the great work of 



the association may prosper in the future, 
as it has in the past. 

(Rev.) O. T. Lee. 



One of the long time sympathizers and 
supporters of the National Christian As- 
sociation in sending in her contribution 
for the work writes : 

Clarinda, la., June 5, 1907. 

I will not be able to attend the annual 
meeting and convention. Wishing you 
success and a good convention I am your 
friend in the work. 

(Mrs.) M. E. McKee. 



Rev. George Bradfield, pastor of the 
Free ]\Iethodist Church of St. Charles, 
III, was unable to attend the annual 
meeting, but the church elected Mr. Kirk 
Person and Mr. Wm. F. Jenson as dele- 
gates. Bro. Bradfield would have been 
present himself had it not been that the 
General Conference of his own church 
was in session at Greenville, 111., at the 
same time as our convention in Wheaton. 




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92 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1907. 



Mtm of ®ur Woxt 



The Ohio State Convention was held 
June 24th and 25th, in Zanesville, in the 
Clover Street Free iNIethodist Church. 
Zanesville is a railroad center and also is 
situated on the Muskingum River. 

Rev. J. E. ^^'illiam3, the pastor of the 
church in which the Convention assem- 
bled, gave the Address of Welcome, 
which was responded to by State Secre- 
tary Rev. A. K. Strane. of Reynoldsburg, 
Ohio. Among- the speakers were Rev. A. 
B. Dickie, Kimbolton, Ohio; Rev. A. A. 
Samson, New Concord, Ohio ; Capt. J. M. 
Scott, Granville, Ohio ; and Rxv. J. C. 
Webster. Bloomfield, Ohio. Here ap- 
peared for the first time in connection 
with our Work, Mr. Henry Richey 
Smith, Jr., of Leonardsburg, Ohio, who 
will spend the month of July in the field 
with Mr. Stoddard. We trust that God 
is preparing him for a leading place in 
our Work. He w^as graduated from the 
Ohio Wesleyan University on June 13th. 
His father was at one time president of 
the Ohio State Christian Association op- 
posed to Secret Societies. 



REV. SW ARTZ, FRATERNAL DELEGATE 



To General Conference of the Free Metho= 
dist Church at Greenville, 111. 

Seneca, 111., June 20, 1907. 

Dear Brethren: I have just returned 
from Greenville, 111., where I went as the 
servant of the National Christian x\sso- 
ciation, as its fraternal delegate to the 
General Conference of the Free Metho- 
dist Church. 

I expressed to them your greetings, 
and as opportunity was given me, I pre- 
sented the Cause for which we stand, and 
for which we labor, and assured them of 
your fraternal regard, and confidence in 
their hearty co-operation in the good 
Work for the emancipation of our fel- 
low-man from the infatuation and bond- 
age of the Lodge. I met a very cordial 
Christian welcome. General Superin- 
tendent Rev. W. A. Sellew made reply 
for the Conference, assuring me of their 
sympathy and joint labor in the principles 
for which we stand, and requested me to 



bear to you their most cordial greeting 
and assurance of their prayerful remem- 
brance for the success of your Work. 

This service was not only a labor of 
love, but an honor conferred upon me bv 
the National Christian Association, and 
a visit long to be remembered. 

Yours for service, 

Sam'l H. Swartz. 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

Zanesville, Ohio, June 18, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure — During the cool days 
of the past month your Eastern Secre- 
tary has been on the move. The visit to 
the old homes in the Empire State w?,s 
pleasant, and yet in some respects sad. 
Twenty-five years ago Mr. Franklin W. 
Capwell was leader of the Anti-secrecy 
forces in New York State. His home 
was the home of the N. C. A. represerita- 
tive. He was like a father to the writer ; 
never did he weary in the work, nor 
flinch because the cause was unpopular. 
I visited his old home at Dale, N. Y. 
In some respects it was the same, but 
the great heart that made it has ceased 
to beat. The trees have grown large and 
beautiful, but the hands that planted 
them for over seventeen years have rest- 
ed in the grave. The children are now 
n^en and women, and their children the 
boys and girls of to-day. How I wish 
I could write that they are all as faith- 
ful to truth and right as their father and 
mother ! Some are seeking to live right. 
We may hope the others will grow wiser 
as they grow older. 

The stone marking the grave of the 
faithful Peter D. Miller tells of a life 
consecrated to God and His truth. Mrs. 
Miller lives in Newfaue, a growing town 
near the old home. Brethren Alberty 
and Lewis, both now in their ninetieth 
year, are among those who were aroused 
by the Morgan murder to a life-long op- 
position to the organization that accom- 
plished this murder. They have borne 
their testimony and now^ await their 
heavenly call. 

It was a delight to see the progress 
made by our Wesleyan friends at Hougli- 
tcn, N. Y. When our convention was 
held there eighteen years ago, Houghton 
Seminary was a small, struggling school 



July, liXJl 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



03 



■\.-:th but twenty-five students and one 
building. Xow I found three large, well- 
equipped buildings, one hundred and 
iifty-two students and eleven professors 
and teachers. Fine residences have been 
erected, and they are building a large 
Tabernacle with splendid camp grounds. 
Here is a growing church and a rejoic- 
ing, "happy people, whose God is the 
Lord." If you are looking for a place 
where it is hard to do wrong and easy 
to do right, take a look at Hough*:on. 
^;o saloons, no theaters, no lodges. /V 
collection of ten dollars was handed your 
agent to aid the X. C. A. work. 

Buffalo, X. Y., was not the least in its 
contribution to X'. C. A. work. At my 
lecture in Pastor Seik's (Missouri Luth- 
eran) church there were some three hun- 
dred hearers, who contributed $9. 30 m 
addition to Cynosure subscriptions. Ther:^ 
are many in Buffalo who do not approve 
of the lodges. I am planning to nelp 
with more lectures, etc. 

Your agent always likes to meet wuh 
the Covenanters. He married one. At 
the Synod in Allegheny, Pa.. I found 
many new and old subscribers for the 
Cynosure. The Synod voted me a liear- 
itig, though not as good as some felt our 
cause deserved. Still. I was thankful for 
what opportunity was given. Other in- 
terests naturally felt their importance and 
got -he larger hearing. There is no gen- 
eral dii'position to change the law against 
the lodge in this church, as there is in 
souic others. 

A Sabbath at Tarentum and Hites, 
Pa., gave opportunity to speak to t'^.ose 
who appreciated and contributed in aid 
of our work, in the Free ^vlethodist 
churches at these places and some lodge 
people naturally did not like what was 
said. 

In preparing for the convention to 
gather in rhis city, June 24 and 25, tliere 
has been much to show divine help. 
Friends are responding nicely and we 
believe there is to be an uplifting iiime. 

Rev. A. B. Dickie, of the United Pres- 
byterian church, Kimbolton, Ohio, had a 
meeting announced at the Salem County 
churcli. We drove around to the f amb- 
ers during the day and got buttermilk 
and Cynosure subscriptions. When 'vc 



got to tl^e church there were 132 pre>- 
ent. Aside from a few lovers -with their 
girls, they were mostly women and young 
ladies (it looked like a ladies' missionary 
society). The men came later. The 
collection was not large, but the butter- 
milk was all right. I ani looking for 
Bro. Smith to join me and push the 
work here until after the convention. 
\V. B. Stoddard. 



AGENT DAVIDSON'S REPORT. 

Cairo, 111.. June 18. 1907. 

Dear Cynosure — It may seem strange 
to }-ou to read of my being in Cairo, 111. 
I received an invitation from the First 
Baptist church of this city to preach and 
lecture. This church has a membershij) 
of two hundred. I have received a call 
to serve them as pastor. 

Cairo is infested with various kinds of 
secret societies. There was a sermon 
preached for the juvenile lodges at the 
Fifteenth Street Freewill Baptist church, 
June 16, \vhich almost stripped every 
Sunday school of teachers and pupils. 
If I accept the pastoral work here, I am 
sure to run counter to the Secret Empire. 
I hope friends will pray that I may be 
strengthened^ for the fray. I have se- 
cured a few Cynosure readers here and 
pray God for an abundant harvest. 

AMiile attending the meeting of the 
A\'arren County Baptist Association, at 
Bovina. ^^liss.. Dr. A. ]M. Johnson, Presi- 
dent of the General Baptist Convention, 
dealt the Secret Lodge a terrific blow, 
which started the secret sons of darkness 
to stirring and fluttering. Dr. Johnson 
is an able Christian preacher, who is not 
in the least afraid to tell the truth. 

At Belzoni, Miss., 
I preached in Green Grove Baptist 
church, to a large and appreciative audi- 
ence, and also distributed tracts. I found 
that the anti-secrecy lecture delivered 
here, and the tracts given out. on a 
former visit, have brought forth good re- 
sults. I secured a few Cynosure subscrip- 
tions here, and received a hearty invita- 
tion to return at any time. 

At Silver City, Miss., 
I lectured to the Sunday school and 
|)reached at Sure Hope Baptist church. 
T secured a few new subscriptions and 
distributed tracts. 



94 



GHKISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1907. 



At Seymourville, La., 

I conducted a three-days' Ministers' In- 
stitute, at the Union Baptist church, 
which proved a grand success. I distri- 
buted quite a number of anti-secrecy 
tracts, deUvered four lectures and preach- 
ed three sermons. 

At New Orleans, La., 
I received a heartv welcome from Rev. 
J. Acox, Rev. H. P. Kelley, D. D., and a 
iiost of old friends. I preached for Rev. 
Acox, at St. Mark's Fourth Baptist 
church and for Dr. Kelley at Evangelist 
Baptist church. 

I officiated at two marriages of my old 
parishioners, viz. : Mr. A. W. Bell and 
Miss L. Franklin, Mr. T. Jones and Miss 
A. Bell, I secured a few Cynosure read- 
ers and departed northward. 

At Clarksdale, Miss., 
I preached the closing sermon of the 
Baptist Young People's State Conven- 
tion, and distributed tracts. I also lec- 
tured to a very large Sunday school at 
the First Baptist church. Rev. A. B. 
Cockrell, pastor of the Metropolitan 
church, is one of the ablest young men 
in the State and an ardent anti-secretist. 
The Convention met in his church. 

At Bovina, Miss., 
I had the pleasure of delivering three 
addresses and one sermon. I also preach- 
ed at Jones' Chapel, five miles out in the 
country. 

At Edwards, Miss., 
I lectured to a very large Sunday school 
at Friendship Baptist church, and preach- 
ed for them morning and evening. The 
seed I sowed here in April has produced 
good fruit, as the following, adopted by 
the Ministers' and Deacons' Institute, will 
show : 

''Resolved, That we condemn the busi- 
ness of secret societies being held in our 
churches, such as annual sermons, mak- 
ing public announcement, or any busi- 
ness pertaining to secret societies and 
that we will use our influence against 
. them." 

Mrs. Brown, one of the earnest Chris- 
tian workers here, is making arrange- 
ments for working women to give as 
God prospers them, in order to minister 
to the sick, the crippled and the poor, 
as a means to draw the Christians out of 
worldly societies. May God give her 



strength and make her work a glorious 
success. 

At Canton, Miss. 
At night I preached at Mount Zion 
church. Just as the services at the church 
closed, a poor negro woman whose father 
had died very suddenly, became violently 
insane. She ran into the house, locked 
the door, and set the house on fire, cre- 
mating herself and completely destroying 
the building. The scene was a horrible 
one. I am informed that this poor wom- 
an had been an ardent secretist. 
At Itta Bena, Miss., 
I held a two days' Institute, at the Bap- 
tist church. The first night, the lodge 
had a meeting at the M. E. church, which 
drew practically all the people from my 
meeting; but I think I made a good im- 
pression on those who were present. I 
preached one sermon and delivered one 
lecture in this place. Prof. C. H. Smith 
rendered me invaluable services and 
helped me greatly in the Institute. The 
Cynosure is making favorable impres- 
sions and paving the way for a better 
day among the churches here. 

Francis J. Davidson. 



REPORT OF REV. G. A. PEQRAM. 

Chicago, 111., June 17, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure — After the close of the 
special services in the Melita Wesleyan 
church, I was sick for several iaj/s. 
However, on Sunday evening I accepted 
a kind invitation from Rev. Mr. Gi^roy 
to preach for the M. E. church at Maple 
Ridge, Mich. As it was a stormy day,, 
the congregation was small. 

On May 29th I spoke at the Melita 
Free Methodist church on the injustice 
fostered and protected by lodges. I was 
invited to give another address after pray- 
er meeting the following evening. I spoke 
on the disloyalty of Masons to the Union 
curing the Civil War, and in present-doy 
civil affairs; showing also how contr;;ry 
to the Scriptures are the very principles 
of secrecy. It was enthusiastically re- 
ceived. After I closed Revs. Sibley and 
G. W. Corey, ministers of the Wesleyan 
church, arose and endorsed everything I 
said, and also gave some new good 
points. 

On June 2d I preached in the evening 



July, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



95 



to a crowded congregation in the Free 
Methodist church at Maple Ridge. We 
closed with an inspiring altar service. On 
Monday evening I addressed the Citizens' 
Prohibition League at the County Line, 
on the Relation of the Lodge to the Sa- 
loon. Usually the lodge will use all 
means to protect the saloonkeeper who 
is a member when under indictment. At 
the same time lodge members will tell 
outsiders their lodge is a temperance so- 
ciety, and that they do not permit their 
members to keep saloons or get drunk. 

Rev. D. W. Whybrew, the faithful and 
consecrated pastor of the Friends' church 
at Lupton, Mich., invited me to give an 
address to his people June 7th. Here I 
found a congregation of earnest seekers 
after truth. He kindly invited me to 
remain over the Sabbath. I did so and 
preached on Separation from the World, 
and in the evening on Christian Benevo- 
lence versus Lodge Commercialism. 
Among the few who were opposed to 
me — and there were only a few — I never 
saw any more bitter. Here, as well as 
at Maple Ridge, I found several eager to 
read the Cynosure. 

June nth found me again in Holland. 
This time I found a congregation of will- 
ing hearers in the Fourteenth Street 
Christian Reformed church. Rev. D. R. 
Drukker, pastor. These people seem to 
enjoy listening to a Bible discussion of 
the lodge. It was a pleasure to address 
them. 

The Lord kindly opened up the way for 
me to satisfy the desire of my heart to 
attend the annual convention of the Na- 
tional Christian Association at Wheaton, 
111. Wheaton is a kind of Mecca for anti- 
lodge people, for here have lived the 
founders of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation, Rev. Jonathan Blanchard, and 
his son, Charles A. Blanchard, the pres- 
ent president of Wheaton College. Us- 
ually a man in such position as Presi- 
dent Blanchard feels obliged to cater to 
public sentiment to win prestige and 
patronage. . But he does not seem to care 
for the patronage of policy, but prefers 
the patronage of principle. Here also 
lives the aggressive editor of the Cyno- 
suie, Wm. I. Phillips, whose experience 
seems to be developing that paper more 



and more into an ideal paper of its kind. 

It was an inspiration to hear old vet- 
erans tell of their trials and triumphs of 
other days and the hopeful outlook for 
the present and future. Here were heard 
line addresses on anti-secrecy and kindred 
topics; here we listened to helpful sug- 
gestions, quaint or risky experiences, 
piovidential deliverances and guidances, 
numerous encouraging testimonies, all in- 
terspersed with excellent miisic. It was 
enjoyable as well as inspiring and help- 
ful. 

On Saturday I went to Harvey, 111., to 
visit the Amanda Smith Orphans' Hon^e. 
It was a pleasure to see so many chil- 
dren so obedient and orderly. It 'is in- 
deed an excellent place for fatherless 
and motherless children to receive pro- 
tection, care and direction for life. I tiad 
the pleasure of addressing them twice. 
I also had the privilege of breaking the 
bread of life to the people of the Metho- 
dist church at Harvey, of which Rev. 
A. C. Myers is pastor. He is a seceder 
from two lodges. 

I have also visited Rest Cottage in 
Grand Rapids, another institution which 
deserves both patronage and support, 
while it is trying to redeem the fallen. 
Yours, G. A. Pegram. 



Mr. A. J. Millard, of Little Rock, Ark., 
left for a visit in Michigan immediately 
after the Annual Meeting. He writes 
under date of June 17 that "The con- 
vention was a love feast from beginning 
to end." The words of God's truth both 
''flashed and thundered forth," he says, 
and ''the audiences sat spell-bound" and 
showed its appreciation by the applause 
given at the close of each address. 



Sharp stones and briars are in the 
path of wicked men ; but the way of the 
good man is one of pleasantness. 



The world is as full of good chances 
as the sea of fishes. But then some peo- 
ple are too lazy to fish. 



Temptation tries us all ; but blessed is 
the man who, when temptation comes, 
has strength to resist it. 



riiUi^riAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1001 



STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
CONCERNING LODGES 

FOR SALE BV 

The National Christian Association 
221 West Madison Street, Chicago, Illinois^ 



IMPORTANT INFORMATION - HOW TO ORDER 

The safest as well as the cheapest ways to get books are as follows: 

Always remit the full amount for your order by Bank Draft on CHICAGO or NEW YORK, 
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handle ANY books not advertised, 

TERMS: CASH WITH ORDER. We do not open accounts with individuals. Special discount 
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ON FREEMASONRY 

FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of Unity Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
institution and a critical analysis of the character 
nf each degree, by I'resident J. Blanchard, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
totes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
/ae truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- 
presentation of the lodge-room and principal cere- 
monies of the degree, with the dress of candi- 
dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 
pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cover, 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the oening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and illus- 
trations. It gives the correct method of con- 
ferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the oaths, 
obligations, signs, grips and passwords. All of 
which are correct and can be relied upon. The ac- 
curacy of this work has been attested by high and 
unimpeachable Masonic authority. Cloth, $1.25; 
paper cover, 60 cents. 



OTHER LODGE RITUALS 
AND SECRETS 

REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP I L L U S - 
TRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the LodgCt 
Encampment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. By 
a Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, 
and guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a 
sketch of the origin, history and character of 
the order, over one hundred foot-note quotations 
from standard authorities, showing the character 
and teachings of the order, and an analysis of each 
degree by President .T. Blanchard. This ritual 
corresponds exactly with the "Charge Books" fur- 
nished by the Sovereign Grand Lodge. Cloth^ 
$1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIT- 
UAL. 

An exact copy of the new official ritual 
adopted by the Supreme Lodge of the World, with 
the secretwork added and fully illustrated. Cloth, 
75 cents; paper cover, 35 cents. 
MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
UAL. 

complete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
ficiary and Fraternal degrees (illustrated), witt> 
"unvvritten" or secret work, installation, funeral 
ceremonies, odes and hymns. 35 cents. 

REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
Grder of Red Men, comprising the Adoption De- 
gree, Hunter's Degree. Warrior's Degree, Chief's 
Degree: with the odes, etc. Cloth, 75 cents; 
paper, 35 cents. 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated r tual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commanderj-, comprising the 
degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master. Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A book of 341 
pages, in cloth, $1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

SCOTCH RITE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED 

The complete ritual of the Scottish Rite, 4th 
to H'Svd degrees inclusive, by a Sovereign Grand 
Commander. Profusely illustrated. The first 
chapter is devoted to an historical sketch of the 
Rite by President J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege, who also furnishes the introduction and analy- 
sis of the character of each degree. Over four 
hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
Masonic authorities (three hundred and ninety- 
nine of them foot-notes) show the character and 
object of these degrees and also afford incontro- 
vertible proof of the correctness of the ritual. The 
work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
1038 pages. Per set (2 vols.), cloth, $3.00. Per 
set, paper cover, $2.00. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne. Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639. Chicago. This book gives 
the correct or ''standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
oflScer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry" — Entered Ap- 
prentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
Lodge, and the signs, grips, passwords, etc., all 
of which are accurately illustrated with 85 en- 
gravings. The oaths, obligations and lectures are 
quoted verbatim, and can be relied upon as cor- 
rect. Contains the "unwritten" work. New 
Revised Edition, enlarged to 275 pages ; flexible 
Clotll, $1.00. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition, 40 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
ings of Freemasonry." By Ex-President Charles 
G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Clotli, 75 cents; paper, 
50 cents. 

WASHINGTON, LINCOLN AND THEIR CO- 
PATRIOTS OPPOSED TO SECRET SO- 
CIETIES. 

This booklet contains fifteen portraits of 
statesmen and their testimonies vindicating them 
from any charge of adherence to secret societies. 
10 cents. 

OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGREES 
OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get there thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes hundreds of horrible 
oaths. 15 cents. 

FREEMASONRY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 
LATION. 

By Rev. James P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
tempt to answer the questions : "Is a prodigious 
system, drawing into itself and unifying all minor 
conspiracies, symbolized in the 'Book of Revela- 
tion' ?" and is there now in active operation a 
system approximating the description given in 
Revelation? This is a book both instructive and 
interesting. 30 cents. 

MASONIC OUTRAGES. 

Compiled by Rev. H. H. Hinman, showing 
Masonic assault on lives of seceders, on reputation, 
and on free speech ; interference wMth justice in 
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REVISED REBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 
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Revised .amended official "Ritual for Rebekah 
Lodges, published by the Sovereign Grand Lodge, 
1. O. O. F.," with the "unwritten" (secret) work 
added and the- official "Ceremonies of Insti- 
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of Rebekah Lodges." 35 cents. 

A. O. U. W. RITUAL. 

The secret ceremonies, prayers, songs, etc., 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen have 
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Decorah, Iowa (R. F. D. 6), a very excellent 
Christian gentleman, and a seceder for conscience' 
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SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
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Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes : "That ser- 
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SERMON ON SECRETISM. 

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all. 5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY A FOURFOLD CONSPIR- 
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Address of President J. Blanchard. This is 
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SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

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PRES. H. H. GEORGE ON SECRET SOCIE- 
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A powerful address, showing clearly the duty 
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GRAND LODGE MASONRY. 

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INITIATE? 

By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
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THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
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PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SECRET 
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A most convincing argument against feilow- 
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SERMON ON MASONHY. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a 
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FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THE 
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By "Spectator." Atlanta. Ga. IG pages; 
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CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS 



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EXPERIENCE OF STEPHEN MERRITT, 
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WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

By Col. George R. Clarke. A Thirty-two De- 
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TWO NIGHTS IN A LODGE ROOM. 

Rev. M. L. Haney, a minister and evangelist 
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CHURCH AND LODGE. 

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LODGE RELIGION. 

The Fundamental Doctrine, the "Universal 
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THE l^ORSHIP OF SECRET SOCIETIES 
OFFERED TO SATAN. 

Address by President Blanchard at the An- 
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The Mother of Secret Societies not Jesuitism, 
but Masonry. The Governing Force is Masonry. 
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ODDFELLOWSHCP A RELIGIOUS INSTI- 
TUTION 

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WHY I LEFT THE REBEKA.H LODGE. 

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CATECHISM OF ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

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WHY DO MEN REMAIN ODDFELLOWS? 

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ARE INSURANCF LODGES CHRISTIAN? 

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LODGE BURIAL SERVICES. 

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NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 W. Xfl-adisou Street, OHIO AGO, ILI» 




High In The Re(jIoH5 

)\ Polar Hioht. 
'^f'.'^) Thou 5erv'5T 
A WAYMARK 





Churches 
and Lodges 

Christianity 
vs. Religions 

T/7e Virtues 
and the Lodge 

New Zealand 
Arbitration 

VV/yere Shall I 
Send My Boy? 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 
221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



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CONTENTS. 



Our New Year 97 

The Elks 97 

Where Shall I Send My Boy? 98 

Extra Luggage ..'..... 98 

A Queer 'Prediction 99 

New Zealand Arbitration 99 

The National Anniversary — 

Christianity vs. Religions. By Rev. 

Henry W. Stough 100 

Remarks by Mr. A. J. Millard 102 

Remarks by Mr. Julius Haavind 104 

President Blanchard's Appeal . 107 

Annual Report of Eastern Secretary .... 107 

Reckless Drivers 109 

Obituary — Rev. Edward Hildreth 109 

Serpents in the Eagle's Nest 110 

Honest but Misguided Ill 

News of Our Work 112 

Ohio Friends, Attention ! 112 

Ohio State Officers 112 

Address of Welcome to Ohio Convention. 

^By Rev. J. E. Williams 112 

The Virtues and the rx)dge. By Rev. A. 

A. Samson 115 

From the Michigan Agent 117 

Agent Davidson's Letter 117 

Agent Smith's Report 118 

Secretary Stoddard's Letter 118 

From Mrs. Woods 119 

Got Death Benefit from G. A. R 120 

Churches and Lodges 120 

Oddfellow Statistics , .122 

Knights of Khorassan 122 

Khorassan Clan at Greenville 122 

Nobilio-Morgan 123 

Sinister Oath of the "Black Hand" 123 



No Escape f i-om Black Hand 123 

Obituary — William Meredith .124 

From Our Mail 124 

More Than Two or Three Witnesses .126 



The HERALD OF THE KING 

AND MISSIONARY ADVOCATE 

Monthly, $1.00 Per Year. Sample Copies Free 
REV. JOHN W. WAIIV A. B., EDITOR. 

REV. W. A. McELPHATRICK, B. D., Associate 
Editor. 

(With corps of able contributors.) 
DETROIT, MICHIGAN 



SPECIAL FEATURES. 
"The Herald" is devoted to the subjects of 
Holiness, the Life of Faith, Study of Prophetic 
Truth, Brief Notice of World-Problems, the S. 
S. Lessons, and Missionary Information. 

Each issue contains a sermon on some phase 
of Experimental or Expositional Truth. 

A series of articles now being published on 
*'The Book of Revelation." 

A special department for Ministers on "Min- 
isterial and Homiletical Notes." 

TRIAL SUBSCRIPTIONS 

3 Months 10c; 6 Months 2Sc; 1 Year SOc 

Send us list of names for sample copies. 



Folly, Expense and Danger 

Secret Societies. 

By CHARLES A. BLANCHARD, President 
of Wheaton College. 

They may be rudely classified as religious; 
e. g., the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfellow- 
ship, the Knights of Pythias, etc.: political, as 
the Know-nothings, Knights of the Golden 
Circle, the Order of American Deputies, the 
Kuklux-Klan, the White League, etc.: indus- 
trial; as the unions of carpenters, bricklayers, 
conductors, engineers, etc.: insurance; as the 
Royal Arcanum, the Modern Woodmen, the 
])rder of the Iron Hall, the Ancient Order of 
United Mechanics, etc.: and the social; as the 
college fraternities. Postpaid 5 cents each. 



THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATiOft 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 

Entered at tlie Post Office. Chicago. 111., a* 
«e<^ond class matte* 





'JesDS answered him, — I spakt openly to the nurid; and in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XL. 



CHICAGO, AUGUST, 1907. 



NUMBER 4. 



OUR NEW YEAR. 

I am glad to have the privilege of 
speaking' to you once more regarding the 
great work to which we are called. I 
had felt that possibly some one else might 
serve you more effectively in the office to 
which I have been repeatedly elected, 
and suggested this to the brothers and 
sisters assembled in our last annual meet- 
ing. It seemed to be the will of God 
that I should continue in this position 
as president of the National Christian 
Association for another year, and I am 
anxious to be more efficient myself and 
to secure more service from you than 
heretofore. Will you not unite with me 
in prayer that God will make this a great 
3Tar in our history as an association. I 
think we have been less expectant than 
we should have been, and God is now 
as of old,- hindered by the unbelief of 
His people. We should look for larger 
things and seek to accomplish them. I 
sihall be glad to visit any cdmimunity 
during the coming year, where meetings 
are desired. If you wish some in your 
region, please write me. I may not be 
able to come to all points, but there are 
many workers who will be willing to 
assist if we give them something to do. 
Charles A. Blanchard. 



THE ELKS. 

That faithful friend of every good 
cause, Josiah W. Leeds, of West Chester, 
Pa., had an article in the Public Ledger, 
of Philadelphia, protesting the misappli- 
cation of the public funds in the appro- 
priation by the city of $50,000 of the 
taxpayers' money for the entertainment 
of a secret oath-bound society — the Elks. 
His words were timely. May Crod bless 
him for daring to stand alone. 

The Elks have come and eone. What 



do the Philadelphians think now of their 
^550,000 contribution? What do Chris- 
tians think of their silence? "Delegations 
of Elks fancifully attired" were announc- 
ed to arrive in the city of William Penn 
on the Sabbath ! They came and the city 
was given over to hilarity and carousal. 

An Elk member rode on a burro into 
the City Hall and up to the second floor 
to the Mayor's office. 

"Mayor Reyburn was attending a meeting 
of the rapid transit board and could not be 
seen. 

" 'Gid-dap,' said the Ellv to the burro. 
'We'll see Mr. Clay.' 

"Followed by a crowd, the Texan rode into 
the office of the director of public safety, 
where he was warmly welcomed. 

"Director Clay presented Pitt with the 
city's official badge and told him that the 
badge meant immunity from arrest. 

"He rode down the east staircase and 
started for Magistrate Gallagher's office. 
There the badge w^as ignored and a constable 
lX)unced upon him. It was demanded of the 
magistrate that a life sentence be imposed. 

" 'He's a brother Elk,' murmured the mag- 
istrate, after making some mysterious passes. 
T refuse to sentence him.* 

Fined Drinks for the Crowd. 

" 'Then I will,' roared Judge John Foy. 
who was present and who hates to see a 
miscarriage of justice; 'I will,' and, mount- 
ing the bench, he said : 

" 'I hereby sentence you to buy drinks for 
the crowd.' 

"Pitt rode out of the office, followed by 
the judge, jury and attorneys, into a near- 
by wet goods exchange and paid his fine. 

"The Colorado delegation has trouble on 
its hands. One of its members went out to 
Woodside Park last night and proceeded to 
ride indefinitely on the switchback on a pass. 
The switchback man protested, and the Elk 
chewed his ear almost off. As the peualt.v 
for this offense in Pennsylvania is twenty 



'.>8 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Au.ojiist. irVJT. 



years in the penitentiary, the result of the 
ride may be disastrous." 

The Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks had its origin in an effort to 
evade tlie Xew York State law (1866) 
which closed up all the saloons on Sun- 
da}-. According- to the Cyclopaedia of 
Fraternities "the real founders of the 
EVks may be safely classed as Free Ma- 
:-ons." 



'•Philadelphia. Pa.. July 18.— (Spe- 
cial.) — Two persons dead, fifty more dy- 
ing, and 4.430 suffering from stmstroke. 
is the grim aftermath of the Elks' parade 
in the citv to-dav." 



WHERE SHALL I SEND MY BOY? 

Tens of thousands of young people, 
fathers and mothers, are now" debating 
the College question. Where shall I go ? 
where shall we send? In many cases the 
decision will rest on mere earthly 
grounds. \\''here is there the most money, 
the most fashion, the best chance to help 
my child into worldly prominence. We 
have no message to those who are ani- 
mated by such desires. 

But there are others who are of an- 
other mind, who sincerely wish to get 
for themselves, or their children, that 
education, which shall make for the 
honor of Jesus Christ and the building 
lip of His church. To these persons we 
address a few words of exhortation. 

Do not send your children, if you 
are young, do not go yourself to a col- 
lege where the Bible is either ignored or 
discredited. There will be temptation 
and struggle enough for the man who 
goes into life fully armed. Do not trust 
your own soul or that of your child to 
the care of teachers, who by either ex- 
ample or precept, advise you to throw 
away your sword. "The sword of the 
Spirit which is the word of God." 

Do not send or go to a school the 
chief recommendation of which is that 
its students have money, or excel in 
•athletics or are very numerous. All 
these motives are of the earth. It is a 
sad thing to begin so great a work as 
the training of a soul on so low a plane. 
Men are better than sheep or bull dogs. 
They are not so much to be counted as 
to be iveighcd. The followers of Jesus 



Christ were few. poor and had little in- 
fluence, but they had vast |X)wer. 

Do not send your children, do not eo 
yourselves, where secret societies with 
their initiations, dances, snobbery, de- 
ceptions and frauds are permitted to 
dcs.troy beautiful young people zvith no 
protest from the teachers. The legisla- 
tures, boards of education and supreme 
courts of our nation from ocean to ocean 
are trying to save our young people 
from the ruinous influence of these fra- 
ternities. Do not patronize colleges 
where they are tolerated. 

It is natural that many of our readers 
should patronize Wheaton College in Illi- 
nois. It is one of the colleges which has 
from its foundation stood fast for a 
true faith, a clean life and a broad and 
generous culture. It has sent out a 
great host of men and women to testify 
for the truth and against evil. It has a 
right to expect the generous support of 
all earnest men and women, who are not 
sustaining some other college of like 
character. 



EXTRA LUGGAGE. 

The steamer Baltic brought a man to 
this country from England in season to 
attend the Knights' Conclave at Sara- 
toga. Besides his personal belongings, 
it brought the following- consignment of 
titles for use at the Triennial : 

Earl of Euston, Most Eminent and 
Supreme Grand Master of the Great 
Priory of the United Religious and Mili- 
tary Orders of the Templars of St. John 
of Jerusalem, Palestine and Malta, in 
England, Wales and the Dependencies 
Thereof. 



Metropolitan Holiness Camp Meeting. Aug. 
15 to Aug. 25. will be lield near Waukeslia, 
in one of the most beautiful summer resort 
regions of Wisconsin, 20 miles from Mil- 
waukee, and 120 miles from Chicago, on the 
Northwestern railroad. Tlie meeting Avill be 
red-lhot and on full gospel lines. Campers 
expected from coast to coast. Plan to come 
and bring your friends. For further in- 
formjation write to Edwin L. Harvey. Foun- 
tain Spring House. Waukesha. Wis. 



A tear is never too small to mirror 
the face of God. 



Au^riist. 1001 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



99 



A QUEER PREDICTION. 

Past Potentate Blake may not have 
got past the effect of Zem Zem pota- 
tions when he made the speech at the 
^hriners' demonstration in Boston, in 
which part of what he said w^as this : 

"I can't tell you, illustrious potentate 
and nobles, how pleased I am at the 
success of our celebration, and especial- 
ly of the magnificent and inspiring serv- 
ice of Sunday. I thank and congratu- 
late our illustrious potentate, not merely 
for what he has accomplished in the last 
few days, but for what he has done in 
assisting in the extension of our noble 
and beneficent order. 

"We hear, occasionally, from those 
wdio have not taken the pains to know 
us, some flippant, * careless and unjust 
criticism. I once spoke before another 
body, explaining the prerequisites to be- 
coming a Noble of our order — that the 
candidate must have attained to the dig- 
nity of a Knight Templar or to the 32d 
degree of the Scottish rite. But the time 
may come when the Mystic Shrine will 
be so universally respected for its worth 
that membership in it will be a prere- 
quisite to entrance into a Knights Tem- 
plar's commandery and to elevation to 
the 32d degree." 

It will be a long- pilgrimage throug^i 
the sandy desert we opine, before the 
so-called Christian Knights will become 
what they are by way of firsf becoming- 
Mohammedan Arabs. 



MASONS' WIVES. 

In answering a question, the Texas 
Freemason says that it has previously 
"asserted that it is one of the grandest 
features of this great institution that, 
without any obligation on her part, it 
gives to woman an equal share w^ith man 
of its beneficence and protection. This 
it does, not only to a ^Mason's wife, but 
it includes also his mother, sister and 
daughter." "^^ "^^ * "The claim must 
be founded upon his being in good stand- 
ing in some lodge and worthy to be rec- 
ognized as a brother." The wife's claim, 
moreover, extends bevond his life and 
avails equally for his widow. 

The writer appears to think that this 
is not always known. Yet a possible 



question is how much it would, in man\- 
cases, amount to. The ^lasonic order 
does not appear to be as good for such 
purposes as some others — for example, 
the Oddfellows. 

There are probably a good many othcr 
secret societies which give deceased mem- 
bers' families more money than the Ma- 
sonic one. 

But conceding all that ^lasonry claims, 
is any amount of aid worth purchasing at 
the cost in conduct, or character, or per- 
sonal freedom, or simplicity and clearness 
of record, that Masonry demands ? Is 
it desirable to the wnves of Masons tliat 
their husbands should do so much evil^ 
that to the wives themselves so lictle 
good may come ? 



NEW ZEALAND ARBITRATION. 

Xew Zealand has a compulsor}' arbi- 
tration law, covering, among others, the 
Slaughtermen's Union in the meat pack- 
ing industry. A while ago a group of 
Australians came, who soon after begin- 
ning work demanded higher wages, and 
not long afterward struck. 

This being in violation of local law, 
the arbitration court was invoked. The 
officials of the Slaughtermen's Union 
were called to court, but they explained 
that they were not responsible for the 
strike, the Australians having acted with- 
out authorization by the union. 

Upon this, the court fined each Aus- 
tralian $25. They responded that they 
had no money and could not pa}'. The 
minister of labor called upon the Su- 
preme Court to take cognizance of the 
case, with the result that the court quick- 
ly decided that the strikers, being viola- 
tors of law and disturbers of the peace, 
must pav as ordered, or else be sentenced 
to hard labor in prison for three months. 
Quickly the fines were paid and the men 
at work again. It was suspected that 
the money for the fines was provided by 
tlic union. 



r>uther used to say, "When «)ne conies 
and knocks at m\ heart and asks. 'Who 
lives here:' 1 replw Martin Luther used 
to, luit he has moved out, and Jesus 
Clirist lives here." 



100 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August. irX)7. 



The National Anniversary 



Thursday and Friday, Ju 
(Continued from 
CHRISTIANITY VS. RELIGIONS. 

BY REV. HENRY W. STOUGH. 
(Rev. Mr. Stougli. a ^Yell-know^ preaclier 
of the Gospel of Christ Jesus tbroiighout the 
United States, \Yas seen in the audience dur- 
ing the convention, and was called upon for 
a few remarks. Though Mr. Stough was not 
expecting to speak in the convention, we con- 
sider his extemporaiy address one that con- 
tains the fundamental truths for which the 
National Christian Association stands, and 
we are glad therefore to be able to present 
his remarks to the readers of the Cynosure. 
—Editor.) 

..1 never was in a Convention like this 
before, and I confess 1 do not know very 
much about the subject under discussion. 
I do not know very much about any one 
thing, but I know less about this than 
some other thing's. 

I suppose my view of things is not ex- 
actly in accord with all the things that a 
great many of you believe, as I under- 
stand the work of the Association. I 
rather take that to be the fact. How- 
ever, there is one very important thing 
that has been borne in upon my mind and 
soul, as T have gone- on in my work as an 
evangelist and in dealing with every 
problem that the church is concerned 
with ; I think the most important dis- 
covery that I have made during my min- 
istry is this : That the great controversy 
is not the controvers}^ of Christianity vs. 
Infidelity, but the controversy of Chris- 
tianity vs. Religion. Christianity came 
into a world that was full of religions, 
and by fighting made a place for itself 
among them. The great effort of the 
Poly Spirit has been to demonstrate that 
the religion of Christ, which we call 
Christianity/is the only religion through 
which men can find God. I have found, 
as I have worked the thing out in my own 
mind, and to some little extent in my 
preaching, that if we are going to be true 
ministers, our work must be Christo-cen- 
tric ; and when I say this, I say that 
which I am afraid a good many minis- 
ters, who really are orthodox, have not 
discovered. I think I had been a minister 



ne 13th and 14th, 1907. 
July Number.) 




HENRY W. STOUGH. 

a long while before I discovered that not 
all preaching we call preaching the Gos- 
pel is really and truly Gospel preaching. 
I do not think that the preaching of 
the Law which is so large a part of our 
ministry, is really preaching the Gospel. 
The fact is surprising. I remember when 
Mrs. Stough and I were East last sum- 
mer, and had occasion to hear various 
ministers preach, I remarked to her 
time and again that it was surprising to 
me how few ministers we heard; that 
were apparently orthodox, who were 
really making their sermons Christo- 
centric. There was a code of m.orals 
before Jesus Christ came into the w^orld. 
Aristotle's code was never excelled, and 
about sili that can be said on the subject 
of ethics was said by Aristotle and Plato 
and the other great philosophers of the 
East, and it was surprising to me to 
hear the ministers preaching- mere ethics. 



August, lOOl 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



101 



It is a great thing, if a man begins to 
study his Bible from the standpoint of the 
cross of Christ, and works out from that 
center in every direction in his doctrinal 
preaching; and in connection with that I 
feel quite sure that we can find in the 
Bible something- essential to us concern- 
ing the matter of Secrecy. There are 
certain enemies of the cross of Christ, 
and I believe that Secrecy is to a large 
extent an enemy of the cross of Christ ; 
judging the matter from the point of view 
that all our religious beliefs, and all our 
preaching, and all our living, should be 
Christo-centric. If you work that out, 
you will see where we are going with 
reference to a good many things that we 
say and do in our lives. 

The Character of Satan. 

One of the things in this connection 
that has been a great help to me, is a 
study of the character of Satan. There is 
no subject in the Bible that is more im- 
portant to the student than the study of 
the character of Satan. There is no doc- 
trine that we have been so misguided 
concerning, know so little about, have 
such warped and distorted notions con- 
cerning. I believe if one should take his 
concordance and his Bible text-book and 
work through just the Biblical references 
and teaching with regard to the char-acte.r 
of Satan, he would solve the problem of 
redemption. 

I do not believe anyone wilf ever un- 
derstand the redemption as it is in Jesus 
Christ, until he understands the problem 
of sin; and he never will understand the 
problem of sin unless he studies thor- 
oughly the author of sin. I found in a 
book some time ago a statement to this ef- 
fect, that you cannot find in the Word of 
God a single statement that Satan ever 
seeks to have men do that thing w^hich is 
contrary to their own judgment. Cer- 
tainly Satan is not a being with hoofs and 
horns and all that, but a mysterious being 
who in the midst of the sons of Godmoves 
in the very presence of God ; and that be- 
ing, though fallen, has not lost anything 
except his prestige. He is still the beau- 
tiful, the glorious ; he is still the one with 
matchless power ; he is the one whom you 
will find mentioned in Jude as being con- 
tended with by Michael, who "durst not 



bring against him a railing accusation'"' 
concerning the disposal of the body of 
Moses, saying, '''The Lord rebuke thee," 
showing that his power was still great 
and might}'. I suppose if we should 
read the book of Revelation in the light 
of the interpretation of the future fulfill- 
ment of the prophecy, we should discover 
this : that Satan has to-day access to the 
very throne of God. I suppose that 
would be a startling thing to most of us, 
and yet, if we think of the High Priestly 
work of Christ, the Advocate who mak- 
eth intercession for us continually, we 
would see that there is no reason why 
Jesus should be speaking , for us in the 
presence of God, as our Advocate, our 
Attorney, if there were not one who is 
there speaking against us ! Satan is the 
''accuser of the brethren" ; he is so called ; 
and in the court of Heaven to-day the 
throne of God is still open, and Satan has 
access to it as an accuser. Our Advocate, 
Jesus Christ, 'the High Priest, accom- 
plishes His priestly work — He, the slain 
sacrifice, risen from the dead, with His 
riven side and pierced hands, stands- in 
the presence of God pleading for you 
against the adversary, the accuser of the 
brethren. That is the controversy. 

Away back beyond the confines of time 
there was a controversy in heaven be- 
tween this mysterious being, Satan, and 
some other, whom we do not know, but 
the controversy was over the atoning 
blood of Jesus Christ, for Pie is the Lamb 
slain from the foundation of the world, 
long before He came to earth. The con- 
troversy began right there in heaven. 
God would redeem men through shed 
blood, and I think you will find that that 
was the thing which stirred the whole 
soul of the mysterious being, Satan. The 
moment that Satan struck this earth, he 
began to work to accomplish the down- 
fall of man; and he continued it with 
the coming of the second Adam, in con- 
nection with the temptations of Jesus. 
The controversy is now on, and the point 
is. How can God be worshiped? That is 
the controversy to-day. Sufan con feuds 
that God can be n'orshiped zvithout a 
Christ. You will find that Satan is just 
as much opposed to the wiles of the gam- 
bling hall and brothel, and these degrad- 



102 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1007. 



ing forms of sin, as you are. The vic- 
tims of these are the tiotsam and jetsam 
of his kingdom ; they are the beings who 
have tried to worship God without divine 
help through the atoning Christ. They 
have fallen by the wayside as failures, 
and Satan, as you may say, is kicking 
them out from under his feet, because 
the}- really testifv against His own power. 
Can God Be Worshiped Without Christ? 
Xow I maintain this (and it is as far as 
I can speak to the point) that any 
organization or system which teaches 
that there is any way to God except 
through an atoning Christ, is that which 
}ou and I should avoid -and rebuke, and 
fight against with all our souls, if we be 
true to Him. You notice in this world of 
men about us that we have many such 
systems. There is Mormonism. There is 
Bahaism — I suppose some of you may 
not know that there are several thous- 
and people in the United States who 
are Bahaists. Mrs. Phoebe Hearst, the 
mother of William Randolph Hearst, has 
been a Bahaist. Then there is Theoso- 
phy, and Secret Orders. The point is this : 
Thc\ arc all teaching a zvay to God apart 
from the revealed Christ. That is the 
sum and substance of the w^iole matter. 
When you strike that with reference to 
your own life, in your relation to Christ, 
in your study of the Word of God, and 
study of the problem of sin and redemp- 
tion, you have the crux of the thing ; you 
have it right in your own hand. I be- 
lieve what we need to do is to more and 
more rely on the Christ who said, 'T am 
the Way, the Truth and the Life ; no man 
cometh imto the Father but by Me." 

When men say, "Our Father which art 
in heaven," whether they say it in the 
lodge-room, or down at the Christian 
Science church, or wherever they say it, 
unless it be the Father revealed in the 
Bible, through Jesus Christ, it is blas- 
phemy. 

It is interesting to read in the nth 
chapter of Matthew, what the critics call 
a Johannine statement, ''Neither knoweth 
any man the Father, save the Son, and he 
to whomsoever the Son will reveal Him." 
That is to say, it is impossible to believe 
in God as a Father, or to come to Him in 
any personal way, except through the 



revelation of the Spirit of Christ. Now 
that is something which we might well 
ponder. Whenever you hear men praying, 
"Thou Great Architect of the Universe," 
you have blasphemy ; when you hear men 
praying as they pray in the organizations 
I have mentioned, you have blasphemy ; 
whenever you hear men preaching Christ 
otherwise than as the redeeming Christ,, 
you have blasphemy. 

Now I come back to where I started. 
The conflict of to-day is the conflict of 
Religions vs. Christianity ; as to whether 
man can zuorship God, can find God, ex- 
cept through Christ. I believe that is the 
heart of the controversy. And I really 
think that it would be exceedingly help- 
ful, if you would take your concordance 
and your Bible text-book and take the 
words, "Satan," "devil," "adversary," 
"accuser," and study the passages where 
they occur in your Revised and Authoriz- 
ed versions. Take for instance, 
"Lead us not into temptation, but 
deliver us from the Evil One" ; over and 
over again you will find that Jesus refers 
to the evil one, Satan. It is amazing, it is 
perfectly appalling, it is enough to stir 
the soul of the true Christian, to see how, 
to the ver}^ end, until he is chained and 
imprisoned in the pit, Satan keeps up 
this terrible conflict. 



(Continued from July Cynosure.) 

Mr. Swartz: There is another name 
here, A. J. Millard, Little Rock, Ar- 
kansas. We would like to hear from 
you, my brother. 

Mr. Millard: My dear friends, it is 
so late in the evening that I shall say 
very little. I did not come here to make 
an address, I came here to hear ad- 
dresses. I did not come here to teach 
you anything, but I came as a learner. It 
is a great pleasure to meet these old 
heroes who have been in the field for 
years. It gives my heart such pleasure 
and joy that I cannot express it. For 
sixteen years I have been a worker in 
this Cause, and bless God, I am so happy 
that I came here and have met old 
Brothers Flinman and Stoddard and 
Swartz and Dr. Blanchard; 

Sixteen years ago I happened to go 
to New York State on a visit to mv old 



Anirii>ft. r.MiT. 



CHIUSTIAN CYNOSURE. 



103 




A. J. ^[ILLARD. 

uncle. He put some books into my hands, 
and said, "Judson. I want you to study 
those books;" I went home and studied 
the books, and I was soundly converted 
froni Masonry, and I have been work- 
ing for this cause ever since. I was a 
member and a deacon of one of the larg- 
est Baptist churches in Little Rock, Ark. 

I went out into a little suburb ; there 
I found a brother wearing the square 
and compass in the pulpit, and the super- 
intendent of the Sunday School w^earing 
a square and compass. I said what am' 
I to do here ? I sent to Brother Phillips 
for anti-secrecy literature. I poured it 
into them, sent it to them by mail and 
put it in their pockets. In the prayer 
meeting I got to shouting like a Meth- 
odist ; yes, I got to shouting all through 
my soul ; the Lord put it into my heart 
to pray for this cause. I prayed in such 
a way that it was onl}' a few months un- 
til those Masons took off the square and 
compass, and threw them away. I did 
not seem to care, but the work went on 
and to-day there is not a Mason that 
belongs to that suburban church. 

I went out from that church and went 
to another, and went to preaching, and 
I began to talk with them, that the\- 
must not commit spiritual adultery, be- 
cause that was as bad as committing 
carnal adultery, that God's Word was 
true. The Baptist Association sent up 
a man to silence me, because I had been 



talking that way ; he went around to all 
the members of the church and said he 
would send thejn a pastor. I was not 
an ordained minister. I had a license 
to talk, that was all ; the Lord gave me a 
license to talk and that is better than 
an\- man could give, because He will 
open one's mouth and no man can shut 
it ; that is the kind of license I had, the 
Lord gave me a license ; they ''cut off 
my head" and put another man there, 
and in about six months that church 
was -completely dead — did not have any 
meeting ; they have not had any for 
three or four years. I came back to town 
and went out and joined another little 
church that had completely died, three 
months before. They had had no preach- 
ing. The vSunday School had run out. 
I said, brethren are you going to let this 
church die ? That will not do. I will 
come and help you in the Sunday School, 
and we will get the church revived. Since 
then they have had a revival meeting, 
and called a pastor, and the Sunday 
School that I started with five members, 
now has a membership of sixty, and not 
a square and compass comes into that 
church ! If God has used me, give God 
the glory. They wanted to pay me for 
coming to help the Sunday School. I 
said just thank God, don't thank me, I 
do not want any. 

Sometimes I meet with people and we 
have a battle almost. Going down to 
the publishing office of one of our Bap- 
tist papers that is published in our city 
— the Baptists are divided now, the 
Landmark Baptists and the other, Ad- 
vance Baptists. One believes in going- 
ahead, and the other backward, but to 
tell the truth, they are all going back- 
ward, as far as that is concerned, they 
are not going on. I went in to take a 
man the Oaths of ^Masonry, and some 
books. Lie said he belonged to one secret 
society, and he thought of joining the 
Masons. He belonged to the Modern 
Woodmen, and he said, 'T have a notion 
to join the Masons." I said you have? 
You belong to one ungodly association 
now. Oh, no, he said, he did not belong- 
to an}-. Certainly you have, I told him, 
you have a Brotherhood of the World. 
He says "certainly, but we don't call 



]04 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August. 1^7. 



them brothers, we call them sovereigns." 
I said when I buy a suit of clothes, I 
always like to try it on to see if it fits. 
\\'ould you like to know something about 
Masonry before you join it? Yes, he 
would. Well, I said, I will bring you 
the books. A brother who was present 
came and looked at a book and said, 
''that is not Masonic oaths." I said yes 
it is. "No, it is not, either, that is not 
Masonic oaths." I said they certainly 
are and I can prove it by Masons, and 
have proved it time and again. "Well, if 
they are the men that exposed them 
they, are a lot of dirty scoundrels." I 
have no doubt that w^ithin two or three 
}.-ears that man will quit the lodge. 

I have seen Masons throw their square 
and compass away after reading our lit- 
erature a few months. I can count them 
by the dozen, in the State of Arkansas. 
I have given them tracts, and put them 
in their pockets, and the next time I 
hear from them, thev have quit the lodge. 

Mr. Day: I believe Mr. Haavind is 
here now. Brother Julius Haavind, of 
Chicago, will speak to us on, 'Why I 
Am a Seceder." 

Mr. Haavind: I hope that what I 
have to say will be as a word of warn- 
ing; and if there is any young man 
here to-day that is thinking of joining a 
lodg-e. I hope my testimony will help 
him in such a way that he will not do 
so. I only wish that I had had the 
privilege of hearing Doctor Blanchard 
before I did; it might have saved me a 
number of years of sorrow. 

I was brought up in a Christian home, 
and when I was a young man about 
twenty-one years of age, I was an active 
worker in the church and Sunday 
School. About that time some of my 
friends, members of the Patriotic Order 
Sons of America, after a number of in- 
vitations, succeeded in inducing me to 
join that organization. A short time 
after joining I was appointed on the en- 
tertainment committee, and as we met to 
discuss what kind of entertainment we 
were to have, it was suggested that we 
have an entertainment and a dance. As 
a Christian, I objected to the dance. 
They used this argument : that we could 
have the entertainment and then those 



who wished might stay to the dance. 
Now, certainly, if they granted me the 
privilege of believing that it was not 
right to dance, I ought to grant them 
the privilege of believing that it uras 
right. We finally compromised in that 
way. You will find that is the life in 
the lod'ge all the way through — a life 
of compromise — and for that reason the 
Christian has no business belonging to 
the lodge. 

The night this entertainment came off, 
I went home, and others stayed for the 
dance. 

A short time afterwards we organized 
a military company in our lodge, and I 
became a member of it. Sometime later 
this military organization gave a dance. 
They issued a challenge to a neighboring 
company for a competitive drill, and 
this drill was to take place at the dance. 
Again I was confronted with the right 
and wrong of going to a dance. I being 
the corporal of the company, they used 
the argument that if I dropped out, I 
would spoil the chance of the company 
winning the prize ; consequently I went 
into the ante-room and waited until it 
'was time for the company to go on the 
fioor, and then went in and drilled with 
the company, going home immediately 
afterward. That was compromise num- 
ber two. 

Next I became the captain of that or- 
ganization. We received a number of 
invitations to drill at various places. The 
next was an invitation to drill at a 
masked ball. (You will notice how the 
steps led downward.) I hesitated about 
that — but, of course, the company could 
not drill without their captain. I went 
in a few moments before it was time for 
unmasking (we were to drill at twelve 
o'clock) and drilled the company. I went 
home immediately after the drill had 
been given. 

We received other invitations. The 
next time I went a little earlier, and in- 
stead of going home directly after the 
drill, I waited to receive the congratula- 
tions of those who were present, and 
notably the young ladies. About that 
time — you will see the steps were down 
and down — I received invitations to join 
in the square dance. Of course they 



AiT^st, 1007. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



105 



used the arg'ument : ''You may not think 
it is right to waltz, but certainly there 
is no harm in the square dance/' and so 
I entered into the square dance. You 
can see how it was not very long- before 
I had an insane desire to learn to dance. 
After that I dropped my Sunday School ; 
I dropped going to church — I became 
divorced, as it were, from the church. 
After that I learned to play cards, at 
parties Which that organization, with 
others, would give. So I came to do 
those things that I would not do before 
I went into that secret organization. 

About this time the church choir gave 
an entertainment at the home of one of 
its members, and I received an invita- 
tion. Sad to say, I met some of my 
lodge companions, was induced to drink, 
and I went to that church social, among 
my friends, intoxicated. I woke up to 
the fact of what the lodge was doing 
for me, but I did not drop out at that 
time. 

I^ter I became a member of the Na- 
tional Union (a secret insurance order). 
T was secretary of that organization for 
three years ; then I was elected presi- 
dent. The night that I was elected 
president I paid for a keg of beer out 
of my own pocket, which was drunk at 
the close of the meeting. As somebody 
may object to that statement, saying that 
the organization would not allow liquor 
in the council chamber, I will' say right 
here that this difficulty is overcome by 
adjourning and opening up under ''good 
of the order," and they can do just as 
they please then. 

A short time after my first year as 
president, I went into a religious service, 
and I again consecrated my heart to the 
Lord Jesus Christ. You can imagine the 
conflict that took place in my own heart. 
I was president of that secret organiza- 
tion, and, of course, as president, and as 
a Christian, I could not allow liquor to 
come into the council chamber. I fought 
against it, and I will say that I succeeded 
in keeping it out of the council chamber 
for the remaining time that I was the 
president of the organization. I was re- 
elected president for two other terms, so 
I was secretary of the organization three 
years, and president and delegate (the 



two latter offices went together), of the 
council. 

About that -time the National Chris- 
tian Association held a meeting in the 
Chicago Avenue church. I received an 
invitation to go, and at that meeting I 
heard Dr. Charles A. Blanchard deliver 
a lecture, which brought me to the de- 
cision that I would not any longer belong 
to the lodge. He was very fair; he did 
not attack the lodge, but he made this 
request at the beginning: he wanted all 
who were members of any secret society 
to stand up. After, they did that he 
said, "Now if I make any statemiCnt 
which is not right, I would like to be 
corrected," and from time to time he 
would say, "Is that so? Am I right?" 
Ke ended his lecture with these words: 
"Now if what I have said is true, and 
you are a Christian, what business have 
you in the lodge?" 

As he was speaking I felt that if he 
had known the story of my life from 
its beginning, he could not have told it 
more accurately. He told how the young 
man would come into the lodge room; 
there would be the altar, and on the altar 
the open Bible ; and hearing the chap- 
lain's prayer, he w^ould think it was a 
religiotis organization. I know I was 
impressed in that way. And he described 
step by step how one would be led awa\- 
from Christ and down and down, which 
I had to admit all along was true in my 
own case. 

In the council chamber, although I 
would not smoke, and although I would 
not play cards during the two years I 
was in that lodge; still, every time that 
organization gave an entertainment, or, 
as a delegate, I would have to visit other 
councils, I would have to sit by and see, 
under "good of the order," the liquor 
and the cigars passed. I realized in my 
own heart that for a Christian it was 
not right, and yet I compromised with 
that thing. Still I did not think that I 
ought to come out. But I finally came to 
the decision, as I just told you, that the 
tiling to do was to come out. 

What I wish to prove, more than an}-- 
thing else, by the story of my experi- 
ence, is this : To compromise with any 
sin is eventuallv to be overcome bv that 



km; 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Aiio?iist. 1!X)( 



sin. You can see that that was true in 
my own case. The things that I com- 
promised with — the dance, the card- 
table, the beer drinking — by these I was 
overcome, aUhough I had been broug'ht 
up in a Christian home. I thank God 
that such an association as this has been 
organized, and that meetings are being- 
held in various places in order that peo- 
ple ma}^ know that a person will be 
dragged down b\- going into secret so- 
cieties. 



]^Ir. Day : This timely address makes 
me feel like the old minister who w^as 
being questioned before his Conference 
as to his ability and the result of his 
labors. He had been twenty years on a 
field, and only one soul converted, as near 
as they could find out. After they had 
finished, the old man arose, with the 
tears coursing down his cheeks, and said. 
"Do you say there was one soul convert- 
ed, one soul saved, in twenty years?" 
They admitted that. "Well/' said the 
old man, "give me another twenty years, 
and let me have another chance, twenty 
years more of effort to save another 
soul." 

So I am glad that wt have such testi- 
monies as this to encourage us by the 
way in our arduous work ; sometimes dis- 
couraging, sometimes disheartening, 
sometimes the road is rough, and the 
night is very long — but there comes the 
morning; there come rays of light 
through the darkness ; there come words 
of truth to inspire us. I am glad, be- 
fore God and his Christ, for this dear 
voung man who has been rescued from 
these bonds of iniquity. 



When faith is dead the grave of Chris- 
tian zeal will be found near by. One 
monument will serve for both. 



The heart that is lifted heavenward 
bears the life up with it. 



He who plants a tree by the wayside, 
has conferred a blessing on every passer- 
by. 



The true Christian saint does not of- 
fend b}' making claims of superiority. 



Mr. Phillips : Did you try to get the 
young men out of the lodge that you got 
in? And what success did you have? 

A. To tell you the truth, that is the 
sad part of it. I met with very little suc- 
cess. They had become cold and indif- 
ferent to church work, and I had very lit- 
tle success in getting them out. The dan- 
ger with a young man's going into the 
lodge is on account of the influence he 
may have in getting others to join. He 
has not got the same power to get them 
out. 

Mr. Phillips : Were you superintendent 
of the Sunday school part of the time 
when you were in the lodge? 

A. Part of the time, yes, sir. After- 
wards I was brought face to face with 
the question that I must either give up 
the lodge or my Christian work. I woukl 
say this much, that as far as the Sunday 
school was concerned, that I was little 
more than a figurehead. I simply would 
come before the school and open it, and 
go through the form and close it — that 
was just about as far as my interest went» 
but after I had given up these lodges and 
devoted myself entirely to the work of 
the church, and the school, there was an 
immediate change in the school. We are 
taking a great deal of pride in our Sun- 
day school, in doing what is called the 
home work. When I was in the lodge 
all m}^ tirPiC was taken up in visiting the 
dififerent lodges I had charge of, as it 
was my dnt)/ to visit the CounciLs and en- 
courat'f.: and help them along. 

Q. You say the National Union was 
an insurance society? What objection do 
you have to belotis-jiiig to that ? 

A. At the conclusion of the session, 
under the good of the order, they would 
have these things I spoke of, the stag 
parties and the liquor and so on. 

Mr. Phillips : Did you have a burial 
service ? 

A. Yes, sir, the National Union had a 
burial service, of course. A feature of 
it was that it would lead you to think 
that a person was going to heaven, and 
the brethren would finally meet him there 
- — the same thing is in the Sons of Amer- 
ica. The burial service taught that you 
would meet in the Camp above. 

Q. Would you advise a man to go into 
the order for insurance ? 



AuLnist. 1{X>7. 



OHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



10( 



A. I would not, for this reason — that 
I do not believe anybody ought to go into 
an organization of that kind unless he is 
willing to help build up that organization, 
and how can a Christian give his time to 
building up organizations that he knows 
to be wrong, no matter if his family Is 
going to receive a benefit. 

Mr. Blanchard : What do you think we 
ought to do to prevent young men from 
going into the lodge — what can we do to 
get hold of young men ; how can wc 
reach them? 

A. The only way I know of is to have 
just such meetings as this — to show them 
the evil effects that the lodge has upon 
Christian young men. I believe that this 
result ought to be reached through the 
Sunday school. 

Mr. Ferris : Do you believe in taking 
that .up in the Christian Endeavor? 

A. It was in the Christian Endeavor 
of the Moody Church, I believe in a 
• Monday evening, that I heard this. 

Mr. Phillips : What lodge was it you 
were a member of? 

A. The first was the Patriotic Order 
of Sons of America. I got into that 
through their claim of patriotism. It 
was when Fifer was running for Gover- 
nor, and they were making a great deal 
of the "little red school house." If we 
were 'as active to get people to become 
Christians as they were to get men into 
the lodges, it would be well. The last 
order of which I was a member* was the 
National Union. 



PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S APPEAL. 

We Pray Less and Pay Less than We 

Ought. 

'T think that we all of us come short of 
the duty of the hour. 

''These lodges are numbered by thou- 
sands. There are three hundred differ- 
ent secret societies in the United States. 
Thev' claim six millions of men to-day as 
members ; they claim half a million wom- 
en as members, and the number of wom- 
en who are moving into these societies is 
greatly in excess of the number who 
formerly became engaged with them. 
They claim to be initiating at this time 
over two hundred thousand persons each 
year, and it does not require argument to 
show that a movement of that kind is at 



least a most serious import to the homes 
of the State and to the country. 

'Tf we are opposed to lodges we 
should let this disapproval become 
known. And yet, brothers and sisters, 
as pastors and members of churches, as 
Christian workers in various parts of the 
vineyard of Christ, our Master and Lord, 
I am satisfied that we pray less and that 
we give less toward this agitation, this 
enlightenment of the people, than the 
importance of the subject requires. 

'T think that with hundreds of min- 
isters of the gospel opposed to secret so- 
cieties, with scores of churches believ- 
ing that they are injurious, it seems to 
me that there ought to be a stream of 
men and women and a stream of money 
pouring into the headquarters at 221 
West Madison street, Chicago, which 
would make it far more effective to per- 
form the work than it heretofore has 
been. I believe that many who have 
been in their hearts opposed to secret 
societies, but have not been disposed to 
take hazards and risks ; I believe that the 
Lord will stir them up to do better than 
they have done. 

"1 believe by the blessing of God that 
we who are the opposers of secret soci- 
eties may be stirred to more valiant ex- 
ertions in regard to the truth, and in the 
great work of bringing men out from the 
secret societies and bringing them into 
the glorious liberty of the children of 
God, and that this may be the result let 
every Christian pray now and as the days 
shall pass, for Paul may plant and Apol- 
los water, but God gfiveth the increase." 



ANNUAL REPORT OF EASTERN SEC= 
RETARY. 

To the friends of the Antisecrecy Cause : 
Dear Brethren and Friends — The past 
year has brought unusual opportunity 
and blessing to your Eastern Secretan-. 
My work in the main has been conducted 
along usual lines. Opporttmities for 
reaching- the people have increased, and 
1 have exceeded my best expectations. 
Truly the Christ AX'b.om we love, and 
for Whose glory we lalx^r. has given 
the victories we enjoy. 

Probably the Satanic forces, manifest- 
ing themselves in different forms of the 
Secret Lod2:e, were never more active 



lOS 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 190"; 



than at the present time. As they pro- 
claim their folhes, those of the children 
of light who are not faint-hearted put 
forth greater energy, that the flood of 
iniquity may be stayed, some rescued 
and the man}* warned. 

^lany calls for help have come to 
which your agent has not been able to 
respond. The following- is my record 
for the past year: 

Lectures and sermons, 198. 

Calls, 2,505. 

Cynosure subscriptions secured, 1,034. 

Received from Cynosure subscriptions, 
$1,065.10. 

Collections, aside from moneys secur- 
ed for State Conventions, $342.78. 

Expenses : traveling, hotel and postage, 

$533-i9- 

I have not been without trials and 
discouragements. Believing it best to 
look mostly on the bright side, clouds 
may be excused from my report. God 
has given health. In the twenty thous- 
and or more miles traveled, no accident 
has come. The prayers of friends have 
been many, their contributions have been 
kind and best of all, we are absolutely 
sure of victory in the end. Why should 
our song be in the minor key, or our 
gratitude less than the highest? 
The State Conventions. 

It has been my privilege to participate 
in five of these gatherings during the 
year. The work and trials incident to 
the holding of these meetings can be 
known only to those who have had ex- 
perience. The spiritual feeling of friends, 
their church relations — in short, the 
general situation, has to be taken into 
account. The agent is expected to so 
arrange, that a Calvinist and an Arme- 
nian, a Quaker and a Free Methodist, 
a psalm-singer, a hymn-singer and one 
who does not sing at all, can feel at 
home in united effort against a common 
foe. 

With one exception, these State gath- 
erings were unusually well attended. At 
Berne, Indiana, it was estimated that 
there were one thousand present at the 
concluding service. Pella, Iowa; Mus- 
kegon. Michigan ; and Elizabethtown, 
Pennsylvania, all did splendidly. The 



assistance in the printing and circula- 
tion of programs, in the collection of 
funds, etc., given by our General Secre- 
tary, helped very much towards the re- 
sults obtained. I desire here to record 
m}- gratitude for the generous help given 
by our Board of Directors, and through 
our General Secretary. I believe they 
have soug-ht to do their best for me. I 
should be ungrateful indeed should I 
do less for the Association. 

A Larger Number of Schools Visited This 
Year. 

I believe it very important that the 
children be so instructed that they will 
regard the lodges in their true light. Be- 
ginning with the Christian schools found 
in Grand Rapids, Muskegon and Hol- 
land, Michigan, among our Christian, 
Reformed church friends, I have spoken 
in several of the day schools, telling the 
children of the foolish white men wiho 
play they are Red Men, and of others 
calhng themselves animal names — Elks, 
Eagles, Dogs, etc. The folly of such 
things is, of course, apparent to any 
child having common sense. 

In the Holiness tollege at Oskaloosa, 
Iowa; the United Brethren college at 
Huntington, Indiana; the German Bap- 
tist Brethren college at Huntingdon, 
Pennsylvania ; the Bible Training School 
at Fort Wayne, Indiana; the Capital 
University at Columbus, Ohio ; the Ger- 
man Baptist Brethren college at Eliza- 
bethtown, Pennsylvania ; the Mennonite 
college at Bluffton, Ohio, and the Wes- 
leyan Methodist college at Houghton, 
N. Y., I not only called attention to 
lodge folly, but to its dark and soul- 
destroying sin, being* arrayed as it is 
against the only One who can give hope 
to a lost world. 

The Synods and Conferences. 

As I have had opportunity I have 
brought our work to the attention of 
church courts. During the month of 
August I was permitted to addre^^s the 
friends gathered in three of the State 
meetings of the Missouri Lutheran 
Synod and the Ohio Synod. At these 
gatherings I secured two hundred and 
fifty readers for the Cynosure. Several 
schools and churches of these bodies have 



Au.ffus!:. ltX)7. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



109 



since welcomed my lectures, and an in- 
creasing number of invitations is being 
received. 

Throughout the year I have felt I 
was engaged in a blessed work, for a 
blessed cause, and of course have re- 
ceived a blessing. Yours in the Blessed 
Cause. W. pj. Stoddard. 



€5it0riaL 



RECKLESS DRIVERS. 

To what lengths will not men go, once 
they are attacked by the joiner bug? 
Here were the Xew York City drivers 
cutting oil ice from the masses and leav- 
ing the streets full of dangerous garbage 
just when summer heat was to be ex- 
pected. 

On the East Side, where rapidly putre- 
fying refuse was causing serious danger, 
hundreds of people hooted at workmen 
who were doing something to avert 
death from them and their children, and 
•even hurled missiles. Every cart had 
to be protected by the police. Detach- 
ments of officers also preceded, driving 
loafers off the streets and out of the sa- 
loons. Several drivers were badly beat- 
en. 

At one point there was a severe fight 
with the police. Everywhere it was 
fighting at once against assailants or 
threatening opponents, and against 
stench, filth and dangerous disease. In 
some places heaps of garbage filled the 
streets and putrefying refuse was taint- 
ing the air of the city. But all was of 
no consequence compared with a union. 

At the same time the same union was 
-engaged in creating an ice famine just 
when the greatest need of this necessity 
Avas coming on. Union of this sort is 
disunion from the human race. Frater- 
nal mercies are cruelty made shameless 
and more refined. 



He who fears God will not sneer at 
men. 




It is no use asking God to show us the 
way of life unless we start out in search 
of 'it. 



EDWARD HILDRETH. 

^^'e did not learn of the death of Rev. 
Edward Hildreth until some days after 
the funeral services. It would have been 
a privilege to have done am-thing we 
could to show our esteem for this 
godly friend. He was a rare man. When 
he enlisted in a righteous cause, it was 
for life. ]\Ir. Hildreth was the treas- 
urer of the National Christian Associa- 
tion for some years previous to his de- 
parture from Chicago. He was a sym- 
pathizing- and constant friend, from the 
inception of the association to the time of 
his death. His latest helpful plan was 
to supply the graduates of the Mc- 
Cormick Presbyterian Theological Semi- 
nary with a copy of President Blanch- 
ard's "Modern Secret Societies," or 
President Finney's ''The Character and 
Claims of Free INIasonry," as the student 
might elect, just as he had for several 
years supplied the graduates of the Chi- 
cago Congregational Theological Semi- 
nary. 

Rev. Edward Hildreth died in Los 
Angeles, California, Sabbath morning, 
June 23, 1907. For many years past his 
health had been far from what it should ; 
much of his life, especially the latter por- 
tion of it, had been one of more or less 



110 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Aaigiiist, ^1907. 



siiitering, which was cheerfully borne in 
a Christlike ^.pirit. The deatli oT his 
wife, the youngest daughter of Mr. 
Philo Carpenter, some years ago, was 
keenly felt ; the reunion with her now 
must surely be a glad one. Mr. Hildreth 
was born in ^^'"orcester County. Mass- 
achusetts, in 1833 ; he died in his 74th 
Aear. 

Coming to Chicago as a young man 
lie entered Chicago Theological Semi- 
nary, from which he was graduated in 
1863. having previously devoted some 
time to a successful effort in behalf of 
its financial interests throughout the 
State. His first pastorate was at Clif- 
ton, 111., from which he was later called 
to V\'abasha, Minn., in 1x)th of which 
places he served with -great acceptance. 
Failure of the A^oice after a time com- 
pelled relinquishment of the active duties 
of the ministry, which, however, through- 
out life commanded his unfailing inter- 
est and hearty sympathy. He continued 
to reside in Chicago until 1880, when 
failing health impelled him to seek relief 
in Colorado Springs, afterward in Santa 
Barbara, Cal., and later in Los Angeles. 
He and Mrs. Hildreth were for many 
vears active members of the First Con- 
gregational Church of Los Angeles. They 
gave to the church its large pipe organ 
as a memorial of a son who was acciden- 
tally drowned, but not being completed 
until after the death also of Mrs. Hil- 
dreth, it now serves as a memorial of 
both mother and son. 

Rev. Mr. Hildreth leaves two sons, 
two daughters, and one grandson, who 
cherish the memory of a loving, faith- 
ful, unselfish life, filled with thoughtful 
ministry for others. After the earthly 
ministry of suffering and service, he has 
entered into the higher service of those 
before the throne of Him of whom it is 
written, "His servants shall serve Him." 

Funeral services were conducted by 
Prof. Hugh M. Scott, of Chicago Theo- 
logical Seminary, Monday morning, July 
1st, at the family lot in Graceland. Chi- 
cago. 



One of the directors of the National 
Christian Association is Rev. William B. 
Rose, who was elected Publishing Agent 
of the Free Methodist Church at its re- 
cer.i General Conference. That the posi- 
tion is a very important and responsible 
one is a matter of course, but how im- 
portant few realize. We were agreeablv 
surprised on a recent visit at the growth 
of and present large business interests 
carried on by this publishing house. Mr. 
Rose is known to have some exceptional 
qualiiications for his new ofiice, and we 
congratulate our friends of the Free 
]\.Iethodist Church on their choice. 

The retiring publishing agent. Rev. S. 
i\. J. Chesbro, has placed the Free Meth- 
odist publishing house and business in 
the front rank of such enterprises. The 
General Conference presented him with 
a Loving Cup as a memorial of his great 
worth to the denomination and of the 
affection in which he is held by the 
church. 



You have mistaken the purpose of your 
grindstone if you are holding your nose 
to it. 



SERPENTS IN THE EAGLE'S NEST. 

"Let us hope the day will come when 
the vigorous East with its teeming Cath- 
olic population will sustain the West ; 
and the}^ converge their lines until their 
hands meet in a clasp that will signalize 
the control of this country," :ays a 
former pupil of the present Papal Secre- 
tary of State, Cardinal Merry de Val. 
It is in an article relating to the order 
of the Knights of Columbus that he says 
this. To this order he looks for hasten- 
ing the desired result, and he is its head 
on the Pacific slope. 

The order of the Knights of Columbus 
is dear to that ecclesiastical system which 
is, on principle, opposed to American 
religious liberty and American public 
school education. It is therefore a shock 
to find this enemy invading Faneuil 
Flail ! It is desecration of a place held 
sacred. It is trampling noble associa- 
tions with the feet of slaves. It is the 
inrush of Vandals. 

The fourth degree, which is less fre- 
quently conferred than any other of the 
order, was worked on almost 250 candi- 
dates, making them less American than 
ever and doubly the slaves of Rome. As 
if to intensify the enacted sarcasm, a din- 



August, imj' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Ill 



ner was served at eight o'clock in a 
hotel named American. 

Faneuil Hall is one of the last public 
buildings of its kind in which to look for 
a secret order, and the Knights of 
Columbus are among the last orders that 
could intrude there with possible avoid- 
ance of shock at the sacriligious desecra- 
tion. To the last degree foreign and 
violently alien, in spirit and purpose anti- 
American, dragging back toward the 
dark ages which it tends to copy in the 
face of Christian enlightenment and in- 
tellectual illumination, it shows black 
against the glowing background of 
Faneuil Hall. 



HONEST BUT MISGUIDED. 

It is something to be credited with 
honesty when mistaken, and miore to be 
accounted honest when not mistaken but 
only thought so. We enjoy the latter 
felicity by favor of Rev. Edward G. Ma- 
son, whose theolog'ifcal adaptations (to 
Masonn- we do not know and can only 
suspect or infer, but who is a real Ma- 
son in mind as well as in name. His 
article in the Masonic Voice Review of 
February, 1901, was headed, "Washing- 
ton, Christian and Free Mason," and at 
one point he said : 

''As a minister and a Free ]vIason , I 
am proud that George Washington was 
a Christian and a member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity." He proceeds with as- 
sertion of the identity of the virtues of 
Christianity and Masonn\ He asserts 
that the principles governing Washing- 
ton are taught both in the church and 
the lodge and adds that lodge prayers 
might be offered in church. The pre- 
cepts of the society are "Christian in es- 
sence." What the statement gains by 
the added phrase, "in essence," is not 
quite clear. Essence is being; it gets 
its significance from the Latin meaning 
"to be." (Esse.) If the precepts are 
Christian in being, in their existence, 
then they are Christian principles. It 
is as such that they exist. Then they 
are principles of Christianity. 

If, then, the principles of Christianity 
are identically taught in the church and 
the lodge, why should any one complain 
if the church is left to women and 



Cowans, while the -enlightened" or "il- 
luramated" betake themselves to the 
lodge? Or again: if such is the identity 
why does not the lodge become a church ' 
why not the church a lodge? What is 
to hinder church members from wearincr 
white aprons ? ^ 

()ur instructor himself checks us here, 
saying: "Do not misunderstand me. f 
do not place these two institutions, the 
Christian Church and the Order of Free 
Masons on the same plane. I do not for 
a moment claim for them equality or 
allow to them equality. Far from 'that. 
I only claim that Masonry, so far as it 
goes, is Christian in principle." 

Well, Masonr3^ goes as far as the 
Third Point of Fellowship ; will our dog- 
matist kindly enter into explanation far 
enough to make clear the identity of such 
complicity in villainy with anything com- 
monly understood to be Christian ? How 
can a man conceal all crimes but two 
and abet criminals, and do it in con- 
formity with teaching that he gets from 
a church while a Mason gets it from a 
lodge? Unless he does explain it, our 
reason and imagination must snap under 
such a strain. 

How far does Masonry go in teach- 
ing morality? So far as to require a 
mutual agreement concerning the very 
nearest relatives of Third Degree Ma- 
sons. Not so far as heart, thought and 
character. Not so far as to reach rela- 
tives removed by so much as one degree 
of consanguinity. Not so far as to in- 
clude any relative of those of lower I\Ia- 
sonic degrees. Not so far as to make 
Chastity itself appear "in essence" any- 
thing but the mutual bargaining of a 
clan concerning a limited class of its 
own female relatives. Not "on the same 
plane?" Apparently not! Need that be 
said ? 

He does well to confess, "I do not for 
a moment claim for them equality or al- 
low to them equality." Neither do we. 
Yet he says : "When those honest but 
sadly misgTiided people who look upon 
^[asonrv as a kind of device of the 
Evil One to lead men astray, declaim 
against it and endeavor to curtail its in- 
fluence, thev are but narrowing the 
sphere of beneficence of one of the 



112 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August. 19()1 



world's most efficient instrumentalities 
for benetiting- and uplifting' mankind." 
And here we leave him to his dogmatiz- 
ino'. 



Mtm of ®ur Pori 



OHIO FRIENDS, ATTENTION! 

H. Richer Smith, Ohio State Agent, 
is a young man about twenty-six years 
old; a graduate last June of the Ohio 
Wesle3'an University. He comes from 
a family of culture and of Christian re- 
form principles. 
His father is a 
prosperous farm- 
er, who has served 
his district two 
terms in the State 
Legislature and 
has often supplied 
the pulpit with ac- 
ceptance as a man 
who believes the 
Bible and has re- 
ceived the Holy 
Spirit for service. 
The father has 




H. R. SMITH, JR. 



filled the office one or more terms of pres- 
ident of the Ohio Christian Association 
opposed to secret societies. The son has 
grown up in a home where the Cynosure 
has been a welcome visitor for many 
years. 

It is due the readers of the Christian 
Cynosure in Ohio that their agent be 
introduced to them and especially as you 
need his work and he needs your sym- 
pathy, support and co-operation. Will 
you not, upon reading this, write to him 
at once and give him a welcome. Tell 
him how much you will set aside each 
month for the Ohio State work. Ask 
him to call when in your neighborhood 
and hold a parlor meeting in your home, 
anc' then help him to open a school house 
or church for a more public meeting. 
Invite a friend from another neighbor- 
hood to be present and hear him and so 
spread the work from one district to 
another. Plan to have him lodged and 
ltd. It is missionary work and as im- 
portant as foreign mission work. 

Recentlv the writer called at a home 



in Ohio, where in addition to their own 
liousehold there were three railroad men 
boarding. The good mother insisted on 
our staying there. She said she could 
put up a bed in the parlor; she had no 
money that she could give just then, but 
she could save the expense of a hotel. 
That is the spirit that moves the world 
towards the millenium! One can give all 
the eggs that are laid on Sabbath, an- 
otlier can entertain an agent over night, 
and another can give money. Every one 
can do something towards testimony 
bearing. . Let every friend in Ohio write 
to H. R. Smith, Jr., Leonardsburg, Ohio. 

OHIO STATE OFFICERS. 
For 1907=1908. 

President — Rev. W. J. Sanderson,, 
Cedarville. 

Vice President — Rev. J. E. Williams,. 
Zanesville. 

Secretary — Rev. A. B. Dickie. Kim- 
1x)lton. 

Treasurer — W. T. Guffy, Zanesville. 

State Agent — Henry Richev Smith, 
Ir. 



ADDRESS OF WELCOME. 

(Address given by Kev. J. E. ^Villiams. 
pastor Free Methodist Chiircia, at the opening 
of the Ohio State Conference at Zanesville, 
June 24, 1907.) 

Mr. President, Officers and Members of 
the National Christian Association, 
Visitors and Delegates. Greeting: 

It affords me great pleasure to be per- 
mitted in behalf of the church and citi- 
zens of Zanesville, to welcome you to 
our city, our church and our homes. 

We most heartily and cordially wel- 
come you as you come to us in this con- 
vention, knowing that by your coming 
we shall be greatly benefited and that 
an influence will go out from this con- 
vention for good and for the bet- 
terment of society. 

We feel that the object for which you 
have come together is a most worthy ob- 
ject, and the cause which you represent 
is a most righteous and noble cause, and 
one in which every Christian and eyery 
patriotic citizen should be deeply inter- 
ested. 

We, as a church and people, are in 
hearty sympathy with the work you are 
doing, having adopted this branch of 



Ansnist 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



113 



reform work as one of the prominent 
issues of the church when first org-anized 
in the year i860, and we have constantly, 
earnestly and faithfully advocated this 
important branch of social and religious 
reform, and steadfastly maintained our 
position for nearly a half century. In 
our book of Discipline and in our Gen- 
. eral Rules are to be found the teachings 
and principles advocated by the Na- 
tional Christian Association. And we 
believe that the founder of the Free 
Methodist Church, Rev. B. T. Roberts, 
was at one time the honored president 
of this association. 

We as a people look upon practical 
Godliness as a never failing result of a 
genuine religious experience. "By their 
fruits ye shall know them." Hence we 
insist that those who profess to be the 
disciples of Christ, should come out from 
unbelievers and be separate and hence 
should abstain from connection with all 
secret societies, and should renounce all 
vain pomp and glory of this world. 

We say in our book of discipline in 
reference to organized secrecy, that 'Vol- 
untary associations are not necessarily 
sinful, because they are secret. But 
secrecy is always a ground for suspicion. 
Evil works and workers instinctively in- 
cline to darkness. Good works grow 
up in light. God commands us to let our 
light shine. Even a good cause, under 
the shadow of secrecy, invalidates its 
claim to the confidence of open and hon- 
est men. Grace and guile can have no 
affinity. All secrets necessary to be kept 
can be kept without an oath. A bad in- 
stitution should not and a good one need 
not be secret. Philanthropic associations 
claiming our co-operation on Chrisitan 
grounds must do so with open face. They 
must lift the veil while demanding our 
salutation, or we cannot salute them by 
the way." Therefore, all secret societies 
are to be eschewed. 

Four years ago the eleventh quad- 
rennium of our church, the general con- 
ference, ordered that the following ac- 
tion of the executive committee be in- 
serted in the Discipline. In 1899 a peti- 
tion was presented from the Central Illi- 
nois Conference, asking whether mem- 
bership in the "Miners' Union" was a 



violation of our Discipline. The com- 
mittee decided as follows: "We are of 
the opinion that these trade unions are, 
as a rule, secret organizations, and. from 
a cursory glance at their nature, trend 
and practical workings, we consider that 
membership in any of these minor secret 
orders contravenes membership in the 
Free Methodist Church." 

In T900 a preacher of the Iowa Con- 
ference asked the decision of the com- 
mittee on a question pertaining to the 
rights of our people to hold membership 
in certain labor unions. The answer of 
the committee was as follows: 

"As the question of our relation to 
secret societies and labor unions has 
again been brought l>efore us by an 
aggrieved member of our church, this 
committee thinks it expedient to make 
the following statement: A\'e reaffirm 
our position regarding secret societies 
as expressed in our discipline, and affirm- 
ed by this committee at their meeting in 
October. 1899. We are unequivocally 
opposed to all secret societies and can- 
not make any change in our rule on 
this subject, nor can we relax in the 
least our determination to vigorously en- 
force this rule without exception or 
favor. We cannot, however, allow this 
position to be misinterpreted and mis- 
construed as opposition to organized la- 
]x)r as such. We are not opposed to such 
proper organization as seeks to promote 
the interest of the laboring classes. It 
would be unreasonable and inconsistent 
for us to do so, as fully three-fourths of 
our membership are found among the 
laboring classes. To oppose organized 
labor that seeks the betterment of the 
laboring classes, would be to oppose our 
own interest." 

You can see by these decisions of the 
executive committee and as adopted bv 
our last general conference, the position 
that we, as a church, hold and are main- 
taining in spite of the multiplied thous- 
ands of secret society members in our 
land. 

We welcome aou because we believe 
t-at the members of this association and 
the speakers, who shall address this con- 
vention, will be able to impart such in- 
struction, and to give so much light uporr 



114 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Anffusr. 1901 



tliis all important subject, that it shall 
prove to be a lasting benediction to this 
citv and to the pastors and members of 
CUV churches, who so g-reatly need the 
•i^ht and information that you are most 
certainly able to give and will impart. 
There ma>' come to this convention 
some preacher who is a INIason, or some 
preacher who contemplates soon becom- 
ing a ]\Iason, and you may be able to 
n}ipart needed light and instruction to 
such, that he may be able to shun the 
tiap and escape the snare which the 
^lasons have set to catch his unwarned 
feet, that he may become their prey. The 
poet has said : 

Let's go where the :NtMsons are met. 
Where traps to catch gudgeons are set ; 
We've the pass\voi-d. the sign and the grip, 
And past the grim Tyler we'll slip. 

"I'm told they're about to take in 
A preacher," said one with a grin. 
"A big gun," said another with glee; 
"No less than a lordly D. D." 

We're here with the mystics shut in, 
Their light, if there's any, to win. 
The candidate's coming! My eyes! 
"His fix" Avould the sisters surprise. '\ 

Just see, from his sole to his crown 
No circus e'er had such a clown ; 
Then look, if yon please, at his feet, 
One slippered, one naked complete. 

His eyes tightly covered, you see, 
His left breast bare and his knee; 
They've haltered himi, too, I declare, 
And made him kneel down for a prayer. 

i 

Now down by Baal's altar he kneels. 
And dreadfully solemn he feels. 
While swearing he'll ever conceal 
And nothing he hears to reveal. 

Henceforth, he a brother is found. 
With priests and with infidels bound, 
And Satan, loud laughing in glee. 
Cries, "You are the preacher for me!" 

Two weeks ago there was a much, 
larger and more notorious gathering in 
our city than this. They came from all 
parts of the State by the train loads, with 
their coaches decorated, their streaming 
banners unfurled to the breeze, and were 
apparently enjoying the best of good 
cheer. The mayor of our city, the edi- 



tors of our local papers and the entire- 
city seemed to be ready to dp them honor 
and to receive them with open arms. All 
seemed to be united in extending to the 
Knights of Pythias a most hearty and 
cordial welcome. 

While these visitors to our city great- 
ly outnumbered you, who have gathered 
here to-day in this convention, yet we 
do not hesitate to say that the cause 
which they represent and for which they 
so ardently labor, is a selfish, sinful, 
Christ-rejecting cause. 

Their work and cause is not to be 
compared with the work and cause you 
have come to represent in this conven- 
tion. Therefore we most heartily and 
cordially welcome you to our city, our 
church and to our homes. We are not 
afraid that our boys and our girls will 
become contaminated, and wrongfully in- 
fluenced by your presence and teachings, 
])Ut feel that they will prove to be most 
wholesome and beneficial to all. 

We bid you a hearty God-speed, and 
pray that the blessing of our Heavenl3r 
I'ather may rest upon this convention. 



Letters to the Ohio State Convention 
were received and read from the follow- 
ing: Henry Miller, Brookville ; F. D. 
Hauptmann, New W^aterford ; H. H. 
Hinman, Oberlin ; John P. Robb, Sid- 
ney ; Mrs. E. D. Root, W^auseon ; Miss 
Georgia Noe, Marengo; J. Swank, 
Brookville ; S. P. Long, Mansfield ; Jno. 
B. White, Chandlersville ; Wm. H. Min- 
ton, Bowling Green ; D. W. Lawrence, 
Wapakoneta; A. K. Strane, Reynolds- 
ville ; E. Brakeman, / Geneva ; T. W. 
Stewart, Belle Centeir ; A. B. Dickie, 
Kimbolton; D. H. Harrington, Colum- 
bus; J. Bolt, Cleveland; T. M. Paris, 
Bellefontaine ; A. M. Overholt, Wads- 
worth; T. C. Speer, Bellefontaine. 



In Christ's humility he is not forgot- 
ten by the heavenly country. God makes 
the very night luminous with his glory 
and accentuates the glory with the 
angel's song. 



The hearing of a man in his home is 
a better test of his character than his 
hearing before his neighbors. 



An.iinsJt. tool 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



115 



THE VIRTUES AND THE LODGE. 

r.Y KEV. A. A. SAMSON. 

Address delivered June 24 at Zanesville, 
Ohio, before the Ohio State Association, and 
requested for publication. 

"Virtues" are defined as "moral ex- 
cellencies." They are claimed and ad- 
vertised either singly or in groups, as 
forming the "creed" or the purpose and 
aim of various secret oath bound orders 
or lodges. For that reason some persons 
contend that those who are unfriendly 
to such lodges are hostile to such virtues 
as they profess to advocate. No sane 
Christian man is opposed to the profes- 
sion or practice of virtue in itself, but 
there is much ground for opposition to 
the claims and use of virtues by lodges. 
For that reason we propose to consider 
the matter briefly, noting a few of the 
virtues claimed by one or more lodges. 

Universal Brotherhood. 

Universal brotherhood is among the 
chief claims made ; sometimes it goes by 
the name of "Friendship." The greater 
lodges of the country set this forth as 
one of the primary ends of their exist- 
ence ; but their friendship is confined 
naturally to those who are the members 
of the orders, and by their own restric- 
tions nine-tenths of the human race are 
excluded from membership. It is not 
the "brotherhood of Jesus Christ" or of 
his church which shuts out children, 
women, the aged, the sick or infirm, 
those without income or who' cannot pay 
for the "friendship" (?). Instead of 
promulgating and practicing the much 
vaunted virtue of "brotherhood" they 
actually are the exponents of the oppo- 
site, or universal selfishness. The whole 
lodge system is permeated with it. They 
claim to and they do secure political, 
business or social advantages, not for 
the men who merit them, but for their 
members, and often by means that are 
reprehensible. 

Charity, 

Charity holds a front rank among the 
virtues claimed. Sometimes in the sense 
of "Love" as taught by the Apostle Paul. 
Such was the statement of Attorney 
Kuntz in a recently 'published address 
which was given in this city. Listen, 
please. Test the workings of the lodge 



he represented and the actions of the 
delegates gathered in annual conclave 
with the teachings of Paul in I. Cor 
13th chapter: "Charity suffereth long, 
and is kind ; charity enyieth not, charit}^ 
vaunteth not itself; is not puffed up, 
doth not behave itself unseemlv, seeketh 
not her own, is not easily provoked, 
thinketh no evil ; rejoiceth not in iniquity, 
but rejoiceth in the truth." The more 
general use of the word is "Benevo- 
lence." The supplying of needy persons 
with care or financial help. True charitv 
does this wherever there is opportunity; 
does it without cost or remuneration! 
Lodge charity does it only for its own 
and that, too, when the fees have all 
been paid. Insurance and accident as- 
sociations do as much and call it "busi- 
ness" and not "charity." 
Patriotism. 
Patriotism is in the list of the virtues 
often claimed. Often the boast has been 
made that the lodges did more than any- 
thing else to bring the war to a close, the 
war of the rebellion. The facts are that 
the "Secession" was hatched in the lodge 
and greatly strengthened by its members 
and methods. They were accountable 
for treason in both armies, for by means 
of their secret and sworn signals Rebel 
spies passed the pickets of the Union 
army and when within the lines learned 
the proposed movements, only to go back 
and plan their defeat. Then note the 
general lawlessness, aided and abetted 
by lodges. They form shelter for evil 
men and evil designs. It is proved by 
the History of the murdered Morgan and 
Masonry; the Molly McGuires in Penn- 
S3dvania ; the notorious Black Hand, and 
more recently and conspicuously by the 
Western Federation of ^Miners in con- 
nection with the trial of its officers, at 
Boise, Idaho. The oath of the lodge is 
often more binding tipon its members 
than is the oath of the citizen. It is 
a matter of history that in this city a 
murder trial was conducted a number of 
years ago, in which the defendant ac- 
knowledged in open court that it was a 
deliberate act on his part, yet the jury 
broug'ht in a verdict of "not guilty." The 
murderer was liberated and turned loose 
upon society. Others were encouraged 



11(> 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1901 



in lawlessness by that fact. How did it 
happen, you ask? ^^'hy the foreman of 
the jury and the murderer were lodgfe 
brothers, and acquital was the verdict in 
the face of the clearest evidence. That 
sort of thing- is common in our land and 
for the same reason. 

Honesty. 

The lodges also claim to promote 
honesty. The ]\Iaster ]\Iason obligates 
himself not to "cheat, wrong nor defraud 
a lodge of ^Master ]\[asons, nor a broth- 
er,'* but says or does nothing about his 
dishonesty to others. A church that 
would teach its members such doctrine 
would be an unworthy advocate of hon- 
estv. 

Chastity. 

The teaching in regard to the virtue 
of chastity is of the same class in the 
]^Iasonic lodge. The ^Master ]\Iason's 
obligation is: 'T will not have illicit car- 
nal intercourse with a brother Master 
IMason's wife, his mother, sister or 
daughter, I knowing them to be such.'' 
Xo restriction is put upon his conduct 
with other women. Is such the chastity 
taught in the Bible? The Rev. C A. 
Blanchard relates an incident in his ex- 
perience when lecturing along this line. 
.V prominent lady teacher in a university 
was defending ^lasonr}' as a protector 
of womanhood. She wore the badge of 
the order as a charm about her neck, 
at the behest of her brother who was a 
member, and boasted that three times 
when approached by men with evident 
evil intent that she displayed the lodge 
symbol and the parties left her. What 
about the other fellow's sister who did 
not have the badge when she came into 
the hands of these same virtuous (?) 
wretches who were so scrupulous about 
their obligations? What about the mul- 
titudes of ''prostitutes" who hover around 
the prominent gatherings of lodges in 
our day' AA'hy are they there? 
Faith in God. 

Faith in God is a virtue claimed by 
most lodges. In what God? Well, in 
the larger orders it is in whatever the 
individual members want to consider as 
god. It may be the god of the Buddist, 
the Mohammedan, the Pantheist, the god 
of reason, or anv other that he may 



choose. AMiat kind of "faith" is that? 
It is no better than that of ''devils'' who 
believe and tremble." 

Truth. 

Closely related to this is another, viz., 
truth. Alany ask with Pilate. "What is 
truth?" The answer is from the lips of 
Jesus, who says, ''Thy word is truth." 
The word has for its ver}- center and 
substance this same Jesus who is denied 
and cast out by these same lodges which 
deny and reject the "Righteousness of 
God," and go about to establish a right- 
eousness of their own. They reject the 
"new and living way" of life and profess 
to furnish "another way." Lots of peo- 
ple put their trust in it, too, for three- 
fourths of the members of the lodgfes 
are .not members of the church of Jesus 
Christ. ]\Iany of these persons refuse 
to have a connection with the church, 
claiming with their lodges that if they 
live up to their teachings that they will 
be saved. Is it not appalling? Where 
the lodges prevail the churches languish. 
Churches are few and true religion scarce 
among the ^lountaineers of our South- 
land, but lodges flourish and have many 
members. In what measure does this 
fact account for their degeneracy? 
Hope of Immortality. 

Hope of immortality, or immortal 
blessedness is promised by many lodges 
to their members. It matters not w^hat 
the personal character of the individual 
rnember may be all through his life, if 
he is true to his lodge obligations, espe- 
cially the financial, his brother members 
will gather about his grave when he is 
dead, and pass him on to the joys and 
privileges of the "grand lodge above." 
And he may have lived a drunkard, a 
libertine or an atheist or all of them. 
Oh, the blasphemy, the delusion, the 
pathos of it all ! 

It is all the devil's counterfeit of what 
is true and good. It is his chief policy 
in these last days to promote evil with 
a covering of good ; to mingle virtue and 
vice; to keep men in the dark in order 
t(^ hold them from the light. 



To reason with a, fool or a drunkard is 
like talking of light to the eyeless fish in 
the river of the ^lammoth Cave. 



Au.irnst. 1901 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



11' 



Mr. A. J. Millard, of Little Rock, Ark., 
has been spending' some time since the 
annual meeting in Iowa. He has been 
doing loyal service in the distribution 
of tracts and in personal conversation, 
but has found it rather difficult to get a 
church or hall in which to give an ad- 
dress. 



FROM THE MICHIGAN AGENT. 

Elkton, i\Iich., July 19, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure — After leaving Chica- 
go I came home to Elkton. On the wa}- 
I gave some Bible readings on various 
subjects, one of which was the lodge. 
On June 27th I distributed some tracts 
on anti-secrecy. I went from Whitte- 
more to Melita Grove camp meeting. I 
preached here five times and gave my 
testimony against lodges. A Wesleyan 
brother followed me, and gave a good, 
strong testimony against secret societies, 
too. He had had experience in two or 
three, and had to come out for conscience 
sake. After service I distributed quite 
a number of anti-lodge tracts. I sold 
some anti-secret books and gave a num- 
ber of Bible readings at homes in this 
lieighborhood. I find that many boys 
and men are anxious to learn of lodge 
principles and practices. They rather 
enjoy declaring their knowledge and 
views of the lodge, much to the annoy- 
ance of the old members. The lodge 
members say the men who ^ learn from 
books would not be able to work their 
^\-ay into a lodge. Well, they are not 
trying to get in, and liave no desire to do 
so. 

I spent a Sunday at Hale Lake, 
preaching morning and evening in the 
M. E. church. Brother David Lowe, the 
pastor, tells me that he never belonged 
to but two lodges, and he withdrew from 
them. At both Hale Lake and Emery 
Junction I left some tracts and books. 

Mr. F. C. Smith, of Maple Ridge, 
Mich., a seceder froni three lodges and 
iormerh- a lodge organizer, is constant- 
ly distributing tracts on the lodge. 

At Bay City I sold some ]x)oks and 
distributed more literature. Hereafter 
the Cynosure will find its way to the 
home of Rev. F. Thrun. a staunch Luth- 
eran minister. 



On Sunday I preached at Wakefield 
tent meeting, held by holiness people. 
During each visit at' both Elkton and 
\\ akefield I am able to distribute more 
tracts and sell more books, besides giv- 
ing some private lectures to groups of 
people in homes. The work moves slow- 
1}', but still it moves. 

Yours for righteousness, 

G. A. Pegram. 



AGENT DAVIDSON'S LETTER. 

We are only able to give an extract 
from ;Mr. Davidson's report for last 
month, which shows that he gave twentv- 
six anti-secrecy lectures, seventeen other 
addresses and sermons, made -119 in- 
dividual _calls, and took ninety-six short 
term subscriptions for the C3^nosure. 

At Greenwood, Miss., Rev. Mr. David- 
son says he was invited to preach the 
Annual Sermon to the W. O. U. Be- 
fore his sermon the King Master and 
the Queen Mistress each gave an ad- 
dress, which told of the great benefits to 
be derived from lodge membership — re- 
ligious, moral, financial and educational 
benefits. Then Mr. Davidson, our agent, 
was introduced. He said he could not 
pay such glowing tributes to the worth 
of secret societies as had their orators, 
but, he writes: ''By the light of God's 
Word I could prove their lodge religion 
to be devil religion ; and their vain- 
glorious titles and high-sounding names 
to be of Baal and heathen worship. I 
then compared their lodge oaths with 
Cod's \\'ord ; their charity with Bible 
charity ; their Sabbath desecration with 
heathendom; and their boasted protec- 
tion, under any and all circumstances, in 
times of trouble, with God's word, and 
showed them the evil and crimes result- 
ing. Many of the female lodge members 
became very indignant, and with imbe- 
comino* remarks left the church. Good 
'Brother Tabor,' a member of the church 
and a high lodge officer, yelled out. 'We's 
tired of your bucking our lodges. We 
want you to preach or stop.' I assured 
him that he could be excused, and go 
outside and meditate, if he wished. The 
church, almost to a member, endorsed 
me. and 'Brother Tabor' had no more 
to sav. 



118 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Auo-,ust, 1901 



"Ti i.'^ the custom of these lodges to 
contribute from five to twenty dollars to 
t!ie i)reacher of their Annual Sermon, but 
on tliis occasion they refused to contri- 
bute one cent, and the Great Queen Mis- 
tress said: 'I would not give him a cent 
to save his dirty life.' This good woman 
is also a leading member of the church 
and high up in its counsels. 

"At night I preached to fully five hun- 
dred people, and received eight dollars 
in contributions, several subscriptions for 
the Cynosure and hearty handshakes 
from fully a hundred persons, with 'God 
bless vou for telline us the truth.' " 



ment, but on the whole there can be no 
doubt of God's presence in the crusade 
against modern lodgism. 

H. R. Smith, Jr. 



AGENT SMITH'S REPORT. 

AA^alton. N. Y., July i8, 1907. 
Dear Cynosure : 

This is my first report. My special 
efforts in the cause of anti-secrecy be- 
gan with attendance at the Ohio State 
Convention held at Zanesville last June. 
On the two Sabbaths following I gave 
brief reports of the Convention at the 
tvvo Wesleyan Methodist Churches on 
the Fargo, O., charge. The people show- 
ed considerable interest and our pastor 
assured me of his hearty sympathy and 
called clown God's blessing on future 
efforts. 

On July 8, I started for New York 
State to spend some time in the 'field 
A>-ith Rev. W. B. Stoddard, assisting him 
and learning how the work is carried on. 

T have been busy jotting down, in 
note book, incidents and suggestions of 
method, wdiich may be of service to me 
in the future. 

I note that there are very many dif- 
ferent dispositions to deal with. One 
man got angry because I brought some 
tracts'to his door. Another man, though 
he belonged to several lodges and was 
drawing $50 a week in lodge benefits 
for a recent injury, talked kindly with 
me about the work and subscribed for 
the Cynosure. Some show a real Chris- 
tian spirit of willingness to hear and to 
see the light ; others close their ears and 
eyes and fly into a passion. 

Sometimes doors were open and some- 
times they were closed. At one time 
fortune seemed to favor our work ; at 
^^nother there was reason for discourage- 



SECRETARY STODDARD'S LETTER. 

De Lancey, N. Y., July 17, 1907. 
Dear Cynosure : 

My efforts for the past month have 
been given to Ohio and New York. In 
both States there are many friends who 
support the work when the N. C. A. 
agent leads and gives encouragement. 
Most of us need some Moses to lead us 
where zve should go by ourselves. 

AVe do not often go unless stirred by 
some one. The "stir" in Ohio resulted 
in an enlargement of our . circle of 
friends, and the sowing of seed that will 
bring fruit in years to come. Several 
meetings were held prior to the Zanes- 
ville Convention : White Cottage, Glen- 
ford, New Concord and other nearby 
towns contributed in aid of this gather- 
ing. A lecture in the Zanesville German 
Lutheran (Missouri Synod) School gave 
its influence in helping some. Brother 
H. R. Smith, the newly elected Ohio 
State Agent, was with me in Ohio and 
is now helping in the work here in 
Ne\.v York, that he may get a better 
understanding of our association and its 
methods of work. 

Though our gathering in Zanesville 
Wc'S smaller than the K. of P. State meet- 
•no- and dance, yet several were helped 
and cheered. It was worth to the cause 
all it cost. The attendance of the Gen- 
eral Secretary was an inspiration. The 
New England Secretary gave us a sur- 
prise, and such help as would be ex- 
pected from his presence. Elder Quincy 
Leckrone could be with us but part of 
the time, we were glad to see his face 
and to hear that he was still pushing 
ahead. Captain Scott spoke with re- 
markable force for one in his advanced 
years. No one would for a moment ques- 
tion his thorough knowledge of the lodge 
system after listening to his address. The 
singing of Rev. A. B. Dickie and wife 
\vas much appreciated—in fact the whole 
program was well rendered and calcu- 
lated to have the desired effect. The 



Ansiist, WiVt 



tlUISl IAN CVN()S[IKK. 



119 



jiiOney need was nearly supplied by the 
collections. 

At Cleveland, Ohio, a lecture was 
.given in the Christian Reformed Church, 
of which Domine J. Bolt is pastor. Sev- 
eral pastors are asking- for lectures and 
arrangements are being made as we trust 
to help many in that city. 

The need of constant ag^gressive work 
was very manifest in our coming to this 
State. While Binghamton, X. Y., like 
many of our growing centers, is flooded 
with lodges, there are a goodly number 
vvho would have it otherwise. Some half 
dozen of these subscribed for the Cyno- 
sure, and were encouraged to move 
against the Satanic lodge strongholds. 
Aleetings in the City Mission and Free 
^(ethodist Church were largely attended. 
My home while there was with our old 
friend Lucius Woodruff. Brother W. 
was the main supporter of the City Mis- 
sion work. At Utica, Richfield Springs, 
Schuylers Lake and Hartwick Seminary 
there were friends to help and multitudes 
needing help. Many tracts distributed 
will carry the truth to those who would 
not otherwise receive it. 

Running unannounced into South 
Kortright, N. Y., on Saturday an ar- 
rangement was soon made with the pas- 
tor of the United Presbyterian Church, 
Rev. H. K. Galloway, by which the writ- 
er supplied the pulpit on Sabbath and 
received the supply of his temporal needs 
and the use of horse and carriage for the 
canvass. Ten Cynosure subscriptions 
were planted in this congregation, and 
three at Stamford just beyond. Mr. J. 
C. Orr, a business man of Stamford, has 
evidently not put his lig'ht under a bushel. 
Hi^ disapproval of the lodge is known 
all through this section. There did not 
at present seem to be any open door for 
lectures at this fashionable summer re- 
sert, now so alive with pleasure seekers 
from New York and other Eastern cities. 

I did not discover any pastors in Delhi 
wanting any anti-secrecy addresses. A 
p??tor invited my help in preaching pro- 
vided I would not stir the ^lasons that 
V. ere numerous, he said, in his church. 
! ie wished the Masons were all out of the 
lodge, but did not feel disposed to join 
nic in getting them out. The pastor of 



the Covenanter Church at Bovina, X. Y., 
assured me over the phone that he would 
make appointments for me for Sabbath. 

I am waiting the return of Rev. A. M. 
Milligan, pastor of the Cnited Presby- 
terian church here, and expect all the 
work I can do in this section until the 
tw^enty-fourth, when I have promised to 
visit the Camp Meeting to be held by 
Free Methodist friends near Xorwich 
X. Y. 

Pray that (iod may greatly bless these 
efforts for his glory. ' W. B. Stoddard. 



FROM MRS. WOODS. 

Pine Bluff, Ark., July i6, 1907. 

I want to tell you now about my ex- 
perience in Pine Bluff. I am doing mis- 
sion work in this district. I am the 
Baptist women's missionary. I meet all 
the churches in the district and lecture 
to the people on secret societies, and on 
all other sins, but I never leave out the 
lodges, because that is the thing that 
is damning the country. 

I met over twenty-five preachers not 
long since in a Board Meeting, and I 
asked them to show me where they could 
find a text for an annual sermon to a 
lodge and they said, Sister Woods, we 
cannot find any. I said. Well, God is 
holding you responsible for misleading 
the people. They said that they did not 
see it once, as they do now, since they 
have seen the W. C. A. tracts. Some 
of the ministers got disgusted and quit 
years ago, but they are silent on the 
matter. They are afraid to say anything 
about it. 

Rev. D. L. Lindsey, the moderator of 
this district, preached on Sunday and 
told the ministers and deacons of the 
church that they were in these secret 
orders helping to give dances, and hand 
in hand with drunkards and gamblers, 
breaking the Sabbath day, and giving 
their time and money to Baal worship. 
Rev. Lindsey said so many good things 
for Jesus ; he made a strong fight for 
the Lord, and made a lasting- impression 
on the ministers. 

I have a good many orders for books. 
llrother Phillips, the war is on between 
the orders and the church and you know 
which will stand. 



120 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Aiig)ust, 1907, 



I send you a clipping from the Bap- 
tist A'anguard. You can see what Dr. 
3.Iorris says about ''annual sermons." It 
is such a pity that he don't come out of 
the orders and take a decided stand for 
Christ. You know it don't do much good 
to try to stop a fellow from doing wrong, 
when you are in the wrong with him. I 
have had so many tell me that they will 
come out, if Dr. Morris comes out. 

T wonder to myself if these men are 
going to take what money they have paid 
in these orders in exchange for their 
.^ouls. It is a bad thing for God's min- 
isters to lead wrong. (I Cor., 8th chap- 
ter, 7th to 13th verses.) These secret 
societies are ruining the people, who are 
on their way to hell, and the preachers 
are in with them helping them to go. 
The people are deluded and believe a lie. 
These Worshipful Masters are sitting in 
God's place. (II. Thess. 2:4-12.) 

I am sorry that our great men like 
Morris are in them. I see our religious 
church paper praising the Mosaic Tem- 
plars and the two men that started this 
order are sinners. What does a sinner 
know about the Bible ? All the ministers 
in the State know that these two men are 
sinners, and yet they write this order up 
right here in this State. It is such a 
pity for a man of God to sell himself 
to the devil for a few dollars. Yours in 
Christ's service. Lizzie Woods. 



Blessed is he that planteth and nur- 
tureth a good thought. It will ever be 
a pleasant trysting place for the children 
of his brain. 



Truth will justify our endeavor wheth- 
er we search for it by the light of the 
sun or the glimmer of a lantern. 

There is always hope for one whose 
soul can be moved by the tender voice of 
sympathy. 

He who has not the spirit to give, has 
not the proper spirit for receiving. 

It is well if the star of Bethlehem 
shines over every home. 



Irom ©ur ^uhmm* 



GOT DEATH BENEFIT FROM G. A. R. 

The Appellate Term of the Supreme 
Court yesterday awarded $100 to Miss 
Malvina Zwiefel, daughter of the late 
Henry Zwiefel, in an action she brought 
against Reno Post of the Grand Army 
of the Republic to recover a death benefit. 
Miss Zwiefel's father was a member of 
the organization for over twenty-five 
\ears. At the time of his death the post 
said that he was three months in arrears 
in paying his dues. It was shown in 
court that Mr. Zwiefel had paid the- 
money shortly before his death. Ac- 
cording to H. De Hondt, attorney for the 
plaintiff, it is the first case of the kind 
that has been broug^ht against a post of 
the Grand Army of the Republic. 
— New York Tribune, July 18, 1907. - 



Heaven is God's homestead for adopt- 
ed children. 



CHURCHES AND LODGES. 

More and more the churches and the 
lodges are coming to the point of a 
deadly conflict. 

The editor listened to a big lodge 
preacher deliver a speech at a so-called 
lodge memorial service the other day. 
The whole speech was taken up in laud- 
ing the work of the lodges in compari- 
son with the work of the churches. He 
admitted though that the lodge was not 
a religious institution, and also said the 
lodge could save no one's soul. The 
writer was very glad tO' hear that state- 
ment. But while he came to the point 
of shedding tears over some dear little 
children who were sent to the Odd Fel- 
low's Orphan Home, he forgot to tell 
his large audience about the larger or- 
phan's homes in his own church and 
other churches. He left the impression 
that no institutions in this country had 
Orphan's and Old Folk's Homes but the 
lodges. 

1 have heard a goodly number of Jodge 
orators and lecturers during the jXist 
few years and liave to hear the first one 
yet give credit to the churches for the 
benevolent work they are doing. They 
ignore the work of benevolence in the 
churches on purpose. . 

The fact is that the leaders of lodges 



Ansn^^t. 1007. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



121 



see that the churches are now thorough- 
ly organized for benevolent work and 
are doing more of it in a wider field 
than the lodges and they are guarding 
every point now to save their craft. 

For many years thousands of men and 
women have been kept out of the 
churches for two reasons, to- wit: i. Be- 
cause it took all their money for the 
lodge and nothing was left for the 
church. And with this it took all their 
spare time. 2. Because they felt that 
if they kept their obligations to the 
io<lge, they were good enough and would 
get to Reaven without the church. 

You take a village of six or eight hun- 
dred people with three or four churches, 
then put four saloons in it and three or 
four lodges, and between the saloons and 
the lodges, if they are successful, they 
V ill practical^ kill the churches every 
time. The saloonkeepers will deaden 
moral sensibility and take the cash of 
a large part of the vicinity and the lodges 
will kill out the spiritual life of the 
other part of the community to a large 
extent by a ritualistic moral system, and 
take thousands of dollars of money that 
ought to go to the churches. So be- 
tween the two, the churches are ground 
down to a beggarly position. 

These conditions are to be found all 
over the land. 

Cliurch members whose incomes are 
n.eap-er simply neglect either the lodge 
or the church, where they are men^.bers 
of both and the church is usually neglect- 
ed. / saw this years ago and I gave Up 
all the lodges and paid my money and 
time to the ehurch. 

I do not honestly think that an\' 
preacher or church member has any busi- 
ness from any standpoint whatever to 
belong to a lodge unless it be some pass- 
around-the-hat insurance company, 
where he is not required to attend meet- 
ings. 

Let the outside world do their benevo- 
lent work in the lodges and let the church 
members dO' their benevolent work in- 
side the churches. 

This day will come. The lod^-es and 
the saloons are on their last legs. They 
are both doomed. The lodges are not 



helpful in downing the saloons in anv 
community. 

The big lodge men by the dozen fought 
for saloons in Marion. 

No lodge ever meets in a saloon fight 
to plan to help fight the saloons any- 
where. I have fought saloons for over 
thirty years and I never had the help 
of a lodge in my life. But I have had 
to fight both L O. O. F. and A. F. & 
I\I. lodges who were secretly fighting the 
temperance ticket more than once. The 
lodges have finally, (the most of them) 
voted saloonkeepers from holding mem- 
bership. The Elks are not clear except 
in some local communities. They are 
usually on the whisky side in atmosphere. 
The Eagles are a terrible rum soaked 
set. President Roosevelt, we are told, 
is an Eagle. 

The lodges pay out m.ore money for 
halls, fine frescoing, furniture, fine cloth- 
ing, badges, big banquets, traveling over 
the country, etc., than they do for benev- 
olence. They help no soul to gu to 
heaven. 

Their funerals, when the deceased is 
imconverted, tear down more spiritual 
growth in a community than preachers 
can build up in a year, because the sub- 
ject is always preached to the ''Grand 
Lodge Above." And that is a lie. There 
is no grand lodge in heaven. God Al- 
mighty has no use for one. If Heaven 
is meant by the expression, ''The Grand 
Lodge Above," that is a lie. If they 
mean to say, "The Lodge Upstairs,'^ 
then the deceased should go there and 
no higher. Hence, all this is lying, de- 
ceit and hypocrisy. The lodges teach 
no certain God, no certain religion, hence 
the great number of infidels in the 
lodges. 

It is a catch-all for doubters, skeptics, 
infidels and sports, together with a lot 
of royal good fellows who want to be 
popular in business, politics, and not a 
few preachers who have a foolish notion 
that they have to belong to a lodge in 
order to draw men to the church, but 
the}' fail to draw. 

The lodge will have to go. The goats 
are on their last lame legs. The sheep 
will take the green pastures and the 



1 •2-2 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 191)7, 



Open wood and the prairie lands. I may 
not live to see these days, but they will 
come. 

— Editorial in "Uncle Smu,'' of Marissa, 

III. 



ODDFELLOW STATISTICS. 

The Order of Odd Fellows was intro- 
duced into the United States by Thomas 
^^'ildey of Baltimore and several broth- 
ers April 26, 1 8 19, who organized Wash- 
ington Lodge, No. I, wdiich is still in 
existence. Since then more than 3,000,- 
000 have joined the order. The 15,000 
subordinate lodges to which these belong 
have distributed a hundred and ten mil- 
lion dollars in sick and funeral benefits 
since the organization of the order, of 
Avhich fifty-five million have been dis- 
tributed b}- the 1,100 lodges of Pennsyl- 
vania, which has since the early history 
of the order been the Keystone State of 
Odd Fellow^ship. Some $5,000,000 are 
being distributed annually. Nearly $40,- 
000.000 are now in possession of the 
lodges, and this is increasing some $2,- 
500,000 annually. The order is adding 
to its membership more than sixty thou- 
sand a year in the subordinate lodges and 
more than twenty thousand in Rebekah 
branch, w^hich receives women. The or- 
der of Odd Fellows is much the most 
potent factor in fraternal benevolent 
work in existence. — Philadelphia Bulle- 
tin. April 24, 1907. 



KNIGHTS OF KHORASSAN. 

■"Prompted, perhaps, by a desire for 
Pythian seasons of relaxation and amuse- 
ment of a spectacular as well as mysti- 
cal character, leading spirits among the 
Knights of Pythias produced, full grown, 
in 1894, the Dramatic Order of Khor- 
assan. to which only Knights of Pythias 
are eligible. It is presided over by a 
Most Worthy and Illustrious Imperial 
Prince and is noteworthy, in addition to 
creating new Knights of Khorassan, for 
illuminated pageants and fantastically 
costumed processions between sessions of 
the Supreme Lodge of the Knights of 
Pythias. These Persian quality-folk are 
plainly suggested by the Arabic nobility, 
to join which one must be either a Ma- 
sonic Knight Templar or a thirty-second 



degree Mason of the Ancient and Ac- 
cepted Scottish Rite. The Ancient Ara- 
bic Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 
dates back a quarter of a century in the 
Lmited States, and was followed a few 
years ago by the Imperial Order of Mus- 
covites, which meets in Kremlins, and 
to which members of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows alone are eligible. 
Then came the Knigths of Khorassan, 
of the Knights of Pythias, also wdtli the 
word 'Tmperial" in its title. It meets 
in temples, as do the "Mystic Shriners," 
tO' which are also given Persian or Ara- 
bic names. There were thirty temples 
of Knights of Khorassan represented at 
a meeting at Cleveland in 1896, at which 
time the membership of this Pythian 
imperial appendix was 9,000, compared 
with 1,500 in December, 1895." 
— Cyclopedia of Fraternities. 



KHORASSAN CLAN AT GREENVILLE. 

El Shereef Temple, Knights of Khor- 
assan, ninety-five strong, including some 
who were not Arabs, went to Greenville 
on a special train oyer the Big Four, 
Monday afternoon, to confer the acts on 
thirty Tyros who had embraced the Mo-, 
hammedan faith. The train was decorat- 
ed with Khorassan banners wdth the 
famous elephant in a special baggage 
car. Upon arrival a procession was 
formed behind the Dutch band, in cos- 
tume, and to music in wooden shoe lan- 
guage, marched to the elegant Knights 
of Pythias Hall observed and followed 
bv thousands. After the acts had been 
conferred a four course banquet was 
served. The cordiality of the reception 
by the Greenvillains is the theme of con- 
versation here yet. The Arabs got back 
to Sidney, Tuesday, just as the birds 
were tuning up. 
— Sidney (Ohio) Journal-Gazette. 



If there is no beneficent Providence 
controlling the forces of nature a worse 
thing awaits the world than was ever 
dreamed of at Vesuvius or the Golden 
Gate. 



Better a sling and a few stones from 
the brook than the armor of Saul to one 
who knows not how to use it. 



August, imri 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



NOBILIO=MORGAN. 
The Black Hand, a Relative of Masonry. 

Fearing death from the Black Hand, 
ag-ainst three of whose leaders he turned 
State's evidence, Antonio Nobilio beg"ged 
Assistant District Attorney Robert Elder, 
of Brooklyn, not to release him from 
Raymond street jail. 

The terrified man insisted that he was 
a iijarked man and that he would not 
be long out of jail before the vengeance 
of the society would fall upon him. He 
gave to Mr. Elder a list of more than 
twenty men who were quickly put out 
of the way after betrayin^g the secrets of 
the Black Hand. 

"Let me stay here a while," pleaded 
Nobilio*, when told that he was free. 
"Perhaps they will go away if they do 
not see me for a time. Outside there in 
the street they are waiting to follow 
me until the blow is struck. I have no 
money or place to work, and to leave this 
place without means to fly to another city 
would be my death. Even should I es- 
cape, the vengeance they have planned 
for me must fall some time, for I will 
be followed until their revenge is ac- 
complished." 

About Nobilio's case Mr. Elder said : 

''Nobilio knows that they will kill him. 
But when he leaves the jail he will be 
prepared for them. There has been -too 
lauch of this sort of work, and we are 
going to stop it. The fear gf the Black 
Hand is to-day in the hearts of thousands 
of citizens, but before we get through 
with the assassins the fear of the law 
will be in the hearts of the members of 
tlie Black Hand." 



It is the thing we can do, and is wait- 
ing to be done, that our good angels are 
w^aiting to see us do. 



SINISTER OATH OF THE "BLACK 
HAND." 

"You do swear by heaven and hell. 
by every drop of blood you possess, that 
\'ou will remain faithful to the Mano 
Nera (Black Hand), of which you are 
now a member; that you will never be- 
trav any of its secrets and members ; 
that if called upon to rob, }^ou will rob ; 
that if called upon to murder, you will 
murder ; that ^•ou will obev the com- 



mands of those above you, even though 
you be asked to kill your father or your 
l)rother, under penalty of death for your- 
self and all of your kin." — From testi- 
mony of Joseph Riz::a in the U'ilhes- 
Barre "Black Hand'' trial. 



NO ESCAPE FROM BLACK HAND. 

(Special Despatch to the l'hilacleli)hia Press.) 

Wilkes-Barre, i'a., April 23. — Over 
fifty branches of the Mafia and the 
Black Hand Society exist in this coun- . 
try, each of them ready to execute ven- 
geance upon any man who manages to 
escape from one which threatens him. 
according to the evidence of . Joseph 
Rizzo, one of the three informers against 
the thirteen men accused of being lead- 
ers of the Black Hand and Mafia Socie- 
ties and now on trial here on a number 
of charges. 

On the witness stand to-day Rizzo was 
telling the story of how he had been 
persecuted, his life threatened and his 
money taken by the societ}-, when the 
startling announcement of the wide in- 
il'iience of the society was made. He 
said that when he was planning to flee 
from his home at Browntown in an ef- 
fort to save his money and escape the 
vengeance of the society, a member told 
liim that it would be useless. 

"He said," declared Rizzo, "that wher- 
ever I went the society would be able 
to find me and in this country alone 
there were over fifty branches of it, each 
working on the same plan and keeping 
in touch with each other." 

Balked in this manner, Rizzo testified 
as to how he and his brothers, Salvatore 
and Cliarles, had finally determined to 
defy the society, refuse to an}- longer pay 
tribute and to defend themselves as best 
they could. 

Oath Dramatically Described. 
Previous to this time thc\ had been 
taken to several meetings of members 
of the society and he pointed out among 
the defendants the men who had been 
present at these meetings. Thev had 
been required to take oath of secrecy 
which consisted, as he dramaticall}- il- 
lustrated, by crossing the wrists in front 
of the face, closing the hands with the 
palm downward and rc]~)cating the oath. 



124 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



A'usiist, 1907- 



From time to time he and his brothers 
had paid tribute, but when they rebelled 
tliey were threatened. 

Rizzo said he took $500 to one of these 
places where he had been ordered to 
place it, but also carried his rifle and 
waited in vain for some one to appear. 
>sone came, but the next day he received 
notification to leave the money there and 
not to carry his rifle. He kept the money 
and prepared to defend himself. 

Then the attacks began. The house 
was first dynamited. Later it was bom- 
barded, some fifty shots being fired 
through it. Photographs showing the 
bullete holes were submitted to the grand 
jury and made a decided impression for 
the prosecution. Rizzo also testified that 
letters had been mailed him to terrify 
him into giving the defendants money. 

The Threatening Letters. 

The prosecution offered for exhibits 
the two letters that Rizzo gave to Chief 
Loftus, claiming that their identity had 
been sufliciently established. The de- 
fense objected on the ground that it had 
not been proven whether any of the de- 
fendants had written the letter. Judge 
Halsey overruled the objections. One 
letter demanded $500 to be taken to 
Shaft No. 4 and the text of the other 
was : . 

Browntown, June 13. 

Dear Friend^ — For the last time you are 
notified that our advice is that we shot Iftst 
time only to warn you. If you want trouble 
you will get only trouble. If you don't an- 
swer by Wednesday evening we will mak© 
our answer by blowing your house to pieoee. 

Your friend, 
{Signed) STRONG ARM. 

A postscript with the picture of a 
hand and stilletto were on the back of 
the letter. Rizzo also told of threats to 
cut his flesh to pieces and to eat his liver 
if he did not leave his gun at home the 
next time he took money to them. Rizzo 
testified to giving one of the defendants 
$20, because he was afraid of him. 

District Attorney Salzburg says he has 
some thirty more witnesses to put on the 
stand in the present case and has other 
charges against the accused which he 
may present at the next sitting of the 
grand jury. 



^bttuaru. 



Mr. William Meredith, Rio, Wis., 
died last September, the 27th, aged 79 
years, 6 months and 25 days. 

He was strongly opposed to secret so- 
cieties and though he was very feeble 
the last four years of his life, and after 
he got so he could not read, yet he 
wanted to subscribe for the Cynosure, 
for he wanted to help the cause all he 
could. 



Irom ®ur JlaiL 



BENEVOLENCE AND PROTECTION. 

One of the principal dailies of Phila- 
delphia, which each day issued a special 
supplement during the week of that city's 
recent lavish ''welcom^e" to the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, says 
of the great entertainment and banquet 
given at Washington Park in honor of 
the Grand Lodge : ''Wine flowed copious- 
1}^ enough to have swelled the tide of the 
Delaware, if it had not found a more fit- 
ting destination." And further, as mani- 
festing the greatness of the local hospi- 
tality : ''Open house was kept at the Elks' 
Club, Juniper and Arch streets, where 
free beer flowed for members of the or- 
der all day and night." Alas and alas ! 
where was the Benevolence and where 
the Protection? Will not a "Grand Ex- 
alted Ruler," but not of man's naming, 
be surely inquired of for this? 

J. W. L. 



Elgin, Man., Canada. 
You may count on my being a life 
subscriber for the Cynosure, as I think 
you are on the right track. I have been 
a member of a number of lodges, but re- 
nounced them: all when I became a fol- 
lower of the Lord Jesus Christ. Wish- 
ing you success in the work, yours in 
the light, C. W. Maguire. 



Otsego, Mich., Jan. 10, 1907. 
Received Cynosure for January to- 
day. Am more than pleased with it. It 
has the tone and spirit which, if followed 



Ausjiist, lUOT. 



CHKlSTiAiN CYNOSURE. 



125 



by Christian people everywhere, would 
rid the world of this damnable secretism, 
with its "holier than thou" airs, its long- 
nosed busybody prying into honest peo- 
ple's affairs, and its malicious, brutal, 
cowardly, slanderous persecution of those 
whose only fault is nonconformity ; which 
of course is a capital crime in their pa- 
gan eyes. 

Hoping you may continue to receive 
from on high the needed courage and 
wisdom to successfully carry on your no- 
ble work, I remain, very respectfully, 
Frank L. Straight. 



Goshen, Ind., May 14, 1907. 

I learn that the annual meeting is to 
be held this year at Wheaton (a good 
location, I think), and some of the vet- 
eran brethren are to be there. I would 
gladly take a part. I trust to be present 
in spirit. I need not give any advice or 
instructions. 

It must be a fact apparent to all well 
instructed Christians, that the truths of 
divine prophecy must be fulfilled. The 
time has fully come when no man dare 
make war on the Beast or his image, 
Free Masonry. We are almost at the 
end. We must be plain and uncom- 
promising, and not cease our effort. 
(Eld.) Joel H. Austin. 

Cleveland, Ohio, May 24, 1907. 
I certainly would attend the annual 
meeting this year if it was among the 
possibilities. (Rev.) I. R. B. Arnold. 

Granville, Ohio, June 10, 1907. 

And this is truly lodge charity! You 
must pay to receive it ; cannot have it 
if you are too young or too old ; you 
cannot buy it if diseased and cripplcvd so 
that you cannot support yourself ; you 
need not ask charity of the order if God 
made you a woman or gave you a black 
skin. 

How different is lodge charity (or 
selhshness) from Christian charity, which 
gives and works, hoping for nothing ui 
return. Lodge charity and brotherhood 
are simply barriers erected against tlie 
common brotherhood. J. M. Scott. 

Dear Christian Cynosure : 

The downward trend of the devotees 
of secretism is noticeable if vou consider 



the standard they have set for their va- 
rious lodges. Taking account of the 
characters composing any lodge, one 
would judge that if thfc Buffalo, Elk, 
Eagle, Red Men, etc., could realize that 
they are being used to represent such 
characters, they would be very indig- 
nant. 

Tlicrc is one animal that so far has 
escaped the humiliation, and he, being a 
worthy beast of spotless character, find- 
ing himself adopted by, closely related 
to. and associated with, such men as 
make up lodges, would resent the broth- 
er.hoofi and withdraw his profaned name. 
The Independent Order of the Grand 
and Noble Jackass would be a "libel on 
the Ass. 

All animals surreptitiously dragged 
into lodgery, and imagined as representa- 
tive lodge members, unable to express in- 
dignation, are suffering the criticism 
their associations involve, without re- 
dress. If the Donkey does not escape 
through lack of franchise, he is not re- 
sponsible for the degradation of his fair 
name. 

Is it possible that men made in God's 
image, and intended, by the aspirations 
of mind, to imitate everything uplifting 
and ennobling, would willingly seek, ac- 
cept and fraternize such low and lawless 
combinations? Many ministers and men 
professing to be Christians go into these 
lodges in violation of their better nature, 
for the sole purpose of reaping whatever 
worldly benefit may accrue from the un- 
godly compact. 

L.ook out for the new lodge ! 

Ailegheny, Pa. Joseph ^NIcKee. 



Siloam Springs, Ark., I\Iay 29, 1907. 

The dear old Cynosure has been a wel- 
come, regular visitor for many long 
years and I hereby financially invite its 
ccnitinuance. It has been brave and 
faithful all these years in fighting the bat- 
tles waged against the powers of dark- 
ness. Brave, because of its fidelity mani- 
fested at all times, and under all circum- 
stances, whether prosperous or adverse, 
in bearing the banner of reform, espe- 
cially along the line of secretism, and 
v.hile much has been done, there seemiS 
nmch more to be done. Secret orders 



12(3 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August. 1007, 



seem to be on the increase, both in num- 
ber and variety, new inventions along 
that Hne are springing up occasionally, 
and we sometimes wonder if they will not 
sooner or later devour one another. 

i remember well when our late Civil 
Vv'ar broke out, the rank and file of the 
beys in blue would have stacked arms, 
had they been informed they were fight- 
ing to free the colored race from the 
bondage of slavery. But God in his wis- 
dom, suddenly brought about the aboli- 
tion of slavery, and the army was recon- 
ciled to the change, believing it to be a 
good thing for all concerned. So I be- 
lievt God in his own good time and way 
will cause the shackles of slavery to 
secretism to be loosed and the enslaved 
go free. May the Lord hasten that time. 

Dear brother, it would afford me great 
pleasure to be present at your annual 
meeting and meet some of the old staunch 
workers in the cause — but owing to cir- 
cumstances will have to forego that 
pleasure. 

It is almost thirty years since I met 
Bros. Stoddard, Blanchard and others in 
AVashington, Iowa. 

I sincerely hope you will experience 
a pleasant and profitable meeting, and 
that the result of the meeting may be to 
stimulate to more courage and effort in 
the work. And may the Lord bless the 
meeting and direct in all the delibera- 
tions, so that the result will be to his 
glory and the good of mankind, is my 
prayer. 



R. M. Stevenson. 



AVe were pleased to receive a fev/ 
words from our old time friend, Rev. 
L. G. Almen, Treasurer and Solicitor 
of the Swedish Lutheran Board of Edu- 
cation : 

St. Peter, Minn., June 6, 1907. 

Gentlemen — Enclosed please find check 
for the amount of $2 in payment of one 
year's subscription for The Christian 
Cynosure and of my membership fee for 
next year. I appreciate the Cynosure 
and the work of the National Christian 
Associatioii very highly and pray that 
the Lord may bless and prosper its work 
hundredfold the comnng year and 
throughout the future. 

(Rev.) L. G. Almen. 



MORE THAN TWO OR THREE WIT= 
NESSES. 

'In secret have I said nothing." — 
Jesus of Nazareth. 

"Blessed is the man that walketh not 
in the counsel of the ungodly." — David 
the Psalmist. 

"They are a great evil." — Wendell 
Phillips'. 

"Whatever in it is not babyish is dan- 
o-erous." — Chancellor Howard Crosbv. 

"W^e know no government save our 
own." — Grand Lodge of Missouri. 

''All secret, oath-bound political par- 
ties are dangerous to any nation." — Gen- 
eral U. S. Grant. 

"Their plan is to keep out any one 
who is likely to need anything." — Presi- 
dent C. A. Blanchard. 

"They incite a passion for trickery and 
wire-pulling." — Mrs. A. J. Gordon, Pres- 
ident Boston W. C. T. U. 

"Are dangerous to the general cause 
of liberty and are opposed to Christian 
principles." — Joseph Cook, of Boston. 



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SOME REASONS: 

BECAUSE Christians are commanded not to have fellowship 
with works of darkness but to reprove them. Eph. 5: U . 

BECAUSE Jesus said: Every one that doeth evil hateth the 
light. Jno. 13: 20. 

BECAUSE Jesus said: Ye are the light of the world. Matt. 
5: U. He that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his 
deeds may be made manifest, that they are wrought in 
God. Jno. 3: 21. 

BECAUSE Jesus said: ''I spake openly to the world * * * 
and in secret have I said nothing/^ and ^^if any man serve 
me let him follow me.^^ 

BECAUSE those who know and love the truth could, by sign- 
ing the above testify for the right and against evil, and we 
ought to be witnesses in the world. 

Ask others to join with you and a great many who never thought 
about it before, if asked to sign would begin to think what 
Jesus would do about these lodges if he were here. 



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128 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1907. 



STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
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ON FREEMASONRY 

FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

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Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
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accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
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REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIT- 
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HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

Ry Edmond Ronayne. I'ast Master of Key- 
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MYSTIC SHRINE- ILLUSTRATED. 

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FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and I'ractical Work- 
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OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGFEES 
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FREEMASONRY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 
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By Rev. .Tames P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
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MASONIC OUTRAGES. 

Compiled by Rev. II. 11. Ilinman. showing 
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REVISED REBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 
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ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

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WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

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NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 W. ITadison Street, OHIO AGO, ILU 




CHICAGO, SEPTEMBER, 1907. 



ANNIVERSARY OF THE MORGAN MUR= 
DER. SEPTEMBER, 1826=1907. 

"As the investigations proceeded the evidence 
increased that Morgan had been unlaivfully con- 
fined in the Canandaigua jail and secretly conveyed 
to Fort Niagara, where he was confined in the 
magazine. There was every reason to believe that 
he was taken from the magazine and drowned in 
Lake Ontario. 

"In the autumn of 1827, the discovery of the 
body of an unknown man on the shore of Lake 
Ontario, near the mouth of Oak Orchard Creek, 
gave a new and absorbing aspect to the question. 
One of our committee went to Batavia to secure 
the attendance of Mrs. Morgan and as many others 
who knew him as would attend. The body had 
been interred where it was found. The rude coffin 
was opened in the presence of between forty and 
fifty persons. When it was reached and before re- 
moving the lid I received from Mrs. Morgan and 
others who knew him well, descriptions of his per- 
son. Mrs. Morgan described the color of his hair, 
a scar upon his foot, and that his teeth were 
double all round. Dr. Strong confirmed Mrs. Mor- 
gan's statement about double teeth, one of which 
he had- extracted, while another was broken, indi- 
cating the position of the extracted and broken 
teeth. When the coffin was opened the body dis- 
closed the peculiarities described by Mrs. Morgan 
and Dr. Strong. 

"This second inquest and the examinations of 
the body proceeded in open day and in the presence 
of Masons and antimasons. not one of whom dis- 
sented from the Coroner's jury, by which the body 
was unanimously declared to be that of William 
Morgan.'' — From ''The Facts Stated.'' hy Hon. 
Thurloir M'v(d. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 
221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

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and to send no bill for the ensuing year. 



CONTENTS. 



Michigan State Convention 129 

"When Teddy Rode the Goat" 129 

Died in the Almshouse — Oldest Mason . . 130 

Religions of the World 130 

A Commendable Plan — Fourth of July- 
Celebration 130 

Sunday Initiation 130 

School Abuses 130 

"The Initiation of Norma". 1.31 

Edmond Ronayne's Letter 132 

President Blanchard's Letter 133 

Missions and Masonry. By Rev. C. B. 

Ward, Missionary 137 

Babi and Episcopal Union — Funeral 

Rites 139 

Chinese Masonic Lodge — cut 140 

Chinese Masonic Funeral 140 

The National Anniversary — 

Devotional Services — Rev. J. P. Stod- 
dard 142 

Christian Science. By Rev. A. C. 

Dixon, D. D 144 

Seceder's Testimony — The Snare is 

Broken. By Rev. S. F. Proctor 148 

Masons and Oddfellows Worship at Fra- 
ternal Homes 150 

Judge Loring's Injunction Against Strik- 
ers 150 

First Black-List Sent Against Union 150 

News of Our Work — Our Needs 150 

Contributions 151 

W. B. Stoddard's Letter 152 



Francis James Davidson's Report .153 

From the Michigan Agent 1.54 

Ohio State Agent 155 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter 156 

Kind Words from Friends. 157 

"The Booze Route" — adA'ertisoraent 158 



The HERALD OF THE KING 

AND MISSIONARY ADVOCATE 

Monthly, $1.00 Per Year. Sample Copies Free 
REV. JOHN W. WAIT, A. B., EDITOR. 

REV. W. A. McELPHATRICK, B. D., Associate 
Editor. 

(With corps of able contributors.) 
DETROIT, MICHIGAN 



SPECIAL FEATURES. 
"The Herald" is devoted to the subjects of 
Holiness, the Life of Faith, Study of Prophetic 
Truth, Brief Notice of World-Problems, the S. 
S. Lessons, and Missionary Information. 

Each issue contains a sermon on some phase 
of Experimental or Expositional Truth. 

A series of articles now being published on 
"The Book of Revelation." 

A special department for Ministers on "Min- 
isterial and Homiletical Notes." 

TRIAL SUBSCRIPTIONS 

3 Months 10c; 6 Months 2Sc; 1 Year 50c 

Send us list of names for sample copies. 



Folly, Expense and Danger 

Secret Societies. 

By CHARLES A. BLANCHARD, President 
of Wheaton College. 

They may be rudely classified as religious; 
e. g,, the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfellow- 
ship, the Knights of Pythias, etc.: political, as 
the Know-nothings, Knights of the Golden 
Circle, the Order of American Deputies, tht 
Kuklux-Klan, the White League, etc.: Indus-* 
trial; as the unions of carpenters, bricklayers, 
-onductors, engineers, etc.: insurance; as the 
Royal Arcanum, the Modern Woodmen, the 
>rder of the Iron Hall, the Ancient Order of 
United Mechanics, etc.: and the social; as the 
college fraternities. Postpaid 5 cents each. 

THE CHRISTIANCYNOSURE 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIOPt 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

NATIONAL CHRISTLAN ASSOCIATION 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 

Entered at ttie Post Office, Chicago. 111.. M 
second class matte* 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly to the norid; aod in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XL. 



CHICAGO, SEPTEMBER, 1907. 



NUMBER 5. 



MICHIGAN STATE CONVENTION 

will be held in Flint, Monday and Tues- 
day, September 23d and 24th, in the Free 
Methodist church. This is in accordance 
with the vote at the last State meeting. 
Pray, work and give, that it may be a 
success. 0'. GROEN, President. 



The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago 
attains its majority at its forthcoming 
annual meeting, September loth, an oc- 
casion which will be marked by an ad- 
dress by Professor James Orr, D. D., of 
Glasgow, and the graduation of thirty- 
one students, who will have completed 
the full two years' course ; several of 
whom are going to the foreign field. 

The privileges of the Moody Bible In- 
stitute are entirely free. Catalogues and 
other literature can be had by addressing 
A. P. Fitt, Secretary, 8o Institute place. 



A lady in Cedar County, Missouri, 
writes that she thinks her pastor needs 
light, and hence she orders tracts for 
him. This Presbyterian pastor told his 
congregation that Christ did not come to 
establish organizations, but principles ; 
and when right principles were estab- 
lished in the heart, then there arose, as a 
consequence, churches, lodges, and other 
Christian institutions. "^ 



There was much excitement in Clin- 
ton, 111., over the finding of the coroner's 
jury in the case of the death of Airs. F. 
ii. Magill. The press stated that: 

The nicjubcrs of the coroner s jury 
zvere all intimate friends and fellozv lodge 
members of Magill and called at his re- 
quest. 

The husband was a former bank offi- 
cial in Clinton, 45 years old, who mar- 



ried a 19-year-old girl one month after 
tlie death of his wife. He has been ar- 
rested for poisoning his wife. 



ELKS AND "DEERS" DANCE. 

Alleghen}-, Pa., Lodge of Elks lived 
up to its reputation for entertaining last 
evening. May 30, wdien the clubhouse 
was turned over to the ladies and their 
friends, who so ably assisted in making 
a success of the bazaar a few weeks ago. 
Several hundred of the "deers" and their 
escorts took part in the affair. 



"WHEN TEDDY RODE THE GOAT." 

[From Masonic Voice-Review, February, 1901.] 

Colonel Roosevelt was recently made a Free- 
mason : hence this poem: 
AYben Teddy rode the goat last vjight. 

The goiu's on, they say, 
Beat all the records out of sight 

For fun iu Oy.ster Bay. 
The mystic boys they all turned out, 

Just as they did to vote ; 
And viewed the sight with wild delight 

When Teddy rode the goat. 

They tossed him np an' trun him down 

An' stood him on his head, 
An' ducked hiin till he almost drowned 

An' yanked him out half dead. 
They made him jig and sing a song 
* An' yell like a coyote — 
B'gosh, you'd ought to been along 

When Teddy rode the goat. 

He rode wild horses in the West 

An' lassoed crazy steers : 
A buckin' bronco was a jest 

To h'm in early years: 
But e'en the jaunt up San ,7uan 

That (famous history wrote. 
Was nuthin' to the goin's on 

When Teddy rode tlie ixoat. 



130 



CHRISTIAN CTYNOSUKE. 



Septeni'ber, 1D07. 



DIED IN THE ALMSHOUSE. 
Oldest Mason in World Dead. 

Richmond. A'a., 'May 31. — Robert Am- 
bler Bruce, 107 years old, who is said to 
have been the oldest Mason in the world, 
died in the city almshouse here to-day. 
He was born at West Overhall, Accomac 
County, Va.. He was a veteran of several 
wars and boasted of having seen Na- 
poleon Bonaparte in 1817, claiming' that 
Napoleon presented to him a cross of 
honor at St. Helena. He had traveled a 
great deal. But may be he did not die 
"paid up." 



RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD. 

The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts 
asked the Sovereign Grand Lodge of the 
World for the order of Odd Fellows, a. 
question which was answered in a way 
to throw light on an order whose mem- 
bers like to think it religious in some 
way deserving of trust, and try to make 
others believe it to be ''founded on the 
Bible." 

"Question — 'Is it lawful for a chap- 
lain to commence and finish his prayers 
in the name of Christ?'"' 

''Answer — Our order ondv requires a 
belief in the existence of a Supreme Be- 
ing as a qualification for membership, 
and has no affinity with any religious 
sect or system of faith. Hence, every- 
thing saA^oring of sectarianism is not to 
be tolerated. The words 'system of faith 
or sect,' do not have reference to sects 
wichin the pale of Christianity, but have 
a far broader significance, and include 
all the religions of the world. Li this 
sense, Christianity is a sect: hence it is 
inexpedient, and, I think, unlawful, to 
mcke prominent reference to it in lodge 
work." 

If the Christian religion is consistent 
vith the Bible and Odd Fellowship is 
"founded on the Bible," how can the lat- 
ter be said to have " 110 affinity with any 
system of faith?" Is not the very claim 
that it is founded on the Bible made for 
the special purpose of recommending it 
as related to the true religion ? Which 
shall we trust: the law laid down for 
the lodge, or the apology put up for out- 
side effect? 



A COMMENDABLE PLAN. 
A Unique Fourth of July Celebration. 

The Christian Reformed Church of 
Leigh ton, Iowa, had a unique festival on 
the Fourth of July, in a grove near their 
church. One thing planned was to do 
something financially for the National 
Christian Association. The collection 
taken resulted in securing for the work 
$21.58. We do not know of a more pa- 
triotic thing to do on such an occasion 
than to seek the deliverance of our coun- 
try from its lods'e thraldom. 



SUNDAY INITIATION. 

Secret orders are showing a great in- 
terest, of a sort, in Sunday. June 30, 
the Foresters of an eastern city met in 
a hall which happened to have been 
named for the Pagan god Apollo and 
initiated a large number. The previous 
Thursday evening they had made the 
Sunday arrangements at the rooms of 
the temperance society of the "Sacred 
Heart." McDermott Court invited the 
degree team of Gallagher Court to take 
part in the ceremonies. The committee 
of McDermott Court consisted of 
Messrs. Martin, Collins, Quinlivan, 
Keough and Maguire. The new mem- 
•bers may now be faithful to the task of 
making America resemble Ireland. 



SCHOOL ABUSES. 

If any further examples of the idiocy 
of schooll^oy "fraternities" had been 
needed, they should be fully supplied 1)y 
the case of the Melrose lads who were 
forced to go to a hospital for treatment 
of injuries after their "initiation," which 
may mar them for life. It is hard to 
see how a school committee can hesitate 
to act with vigor against this foolish 
aping of college abuses which the lead- 
ing colleges have done away w^ith. 
--Boston Herald. 



We master temptation by meeting it 
ard face to face defeating it ; not by run- 
ning from it. The feet of temptacion 
are ileeter than our own and they will 
soon overtake us. But once temptation 
is n'.et and mastered we can pursue our 
way with confidence. 



September, 190' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



131 



€0ntnbutiDn0. 



"THE INITIATION OF NORMA. ' 

The story of a high school sorority 
which appears under the above title in 
a widely circulated Sunday School paper 
issued by a denominational society, shows 
up some features in an effective way, 
without losing hold of the interest or as- 
sent of the young reader. 

The motive of the story is really out- 
side, but the secret society furnishes the 
setting and action. Thus it shares in- 
cidentally in the development and gets a 
few^ exhibitions of its own. 

"They were a group of ten or twelve 
girls forming a part of the high school 
sorority, crowded together in Margaret 
IJurton's room. It was an occasion of 
no ordinary importance. Three girls 
were to be initiated into the sorority, and 
the slips so carefully filled out by Alartha 
Newbury, the president, aided by her 
helpers, were to be distributed this after- 
noon." 

Norma Latham brimming with fun and 
mimicry was one of the elected three. 

"Deal gently with the erring one, my 
sisters," she pleads ; "leave a shred of 
flesh and a few necessary bones." 

"We shall give you no mercy, Norma, 
child of levity and irreverence," chanted 
the president solemnly. , 

Presently -Norma grows inquisitive 
about Leslie Moore. "There was a sig- 
nificant silence." 

"She has been proposed but was found 
ineligible," Celia Monnet announced in 
her imperious, dominant way. 

"What crime has she committed to bar 
her from the sorority paradise ; a mid- 
night theft of cheese and crackers, or, 
maybe, pickles ?" 

"Can you ever be serious or stop play- 
ing the fool. Norma," Celia demanded 
crossly. "We can't be too careful about 
our sorority. We want it to be exclu- 
sive, and high toned, and — and — " 

"Like our public schools, only for the 
few, the wealthy and luxurious class," 
chimed in Norma, glibly. 

Wlien the lists were delivered, "the three 
candidates came forward, took the three 
envelopes extended to them, and went 



forth to their doom. For a week they 
were to have nothing in common with 
th.eir set of girls, and were to perform 
the tasks appointed them without demur 
or resistance." 

"Isn't it Cjueer that we're willing to go 
through it all to join?" Norma asked of 
another candidate, Harriet Chase, as the 
two girls hurried to their homes in the 
early darkness of the fall days. 

"Yes, they all say that, and keep on 
doing it," assented Harriet. "I hope my 
penance won't be very heavy." 

'T know that mine will be," thought 
Norma, as she left Harriet at her door. 
"Celia will take this way of getting even, 
for she never liked me." 

Her list, signed by the president and 
all the members, she found to be as 
follows, and it must have been singularly 
satisfactory, not to say gratifying, to a 
}Oung lady in an advanced educational 
institution, ambitious to join a society 
which could not be too carefully kept 
"exclusive, and high toned, and — " let 
us say, inexpressible. 

1. Take care of Mrs. Flynn's childreu 
for three afternoons. 

2. Black Celia ]\Ionnett's shoes every 
morning, and mend for her whenever re- 
quired. 

3. Dust and put in perfect order the 
front room in the west wing of Airs. 
a\I ills' boarding house at your own con- 
venience. 

4. Climb the big tree in front of Dr, 
Miller's to the top in broad daylight. 

5. Carry on vour head a quart bucket 
full of water from the spring to the post 
office, without spilling. If not, make 
four trials of same before abandoning it. 

6. Walk over to Briarwood Lake Sat- 
urday morning and find the summons 
whicii will be hidden there. 

If these tasks are faithfully performed 
Norma Latham will be admitted to the 
sorority Saturday week in the evening 
with a cordial and loving welcome from 
all the members of said sorority who will 
hold her in loving and helpful member- 
ship as long as she lives. 

Whether she would get through that 
Saturdav evening without fainting was 
v^hat remained to be tested after the half 



13: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Septeiii'ber, 1907. 



dozen items of this preliminary list were 
endured. 

"I see the tine hand of Celia," thought 
Xorma. 

Xorma's married sister was anything 
but fascinated with the sorority. 

As Xorma started for the Fl}nn cot- 
tage, the sister observed to their mother, 
"How foolish all this secrecy is ! I don't 
see how you can allow Xorma to go into 
it. They may injure the child's health 
before she joins the sorority. I shall put 
my foot dow^n that my Beatrice shall have 
nothing to do with such things." 

Xoniia went bravely through such 
things as helping poor Mrs. Flynn. and 
mending for Celia by way of attaining a 
"cordial and loving w-elcome," and a 
membership which pretended to be "lov- 
ing and helpful." She, at least, wdthout 
membership, w^as helpful. But "the tree 
climbing hung over her head like the 
sword of Damocles. Waring w^as a col- 
lege tow^n." 

Wearing her gymnastic suit under a 
long rain coat she reached the tree in 
front of the doctor's house, then throw- 
ing off the coat she swung from branch 
to branch. As she reached the top, a 
chorus of voices from below filled her 
with dismay. There stood several col- 
lege sophomores and juniors cheering 
her. She felt that she could not face 
them. She would stay where she was 
and conceal her face. As she stood in 
her uncomfortable and rather dangerous 
position, she heard one call out, "Oh, 
I say fellows; it isn't fair. It is prob- 
ably a wager, or something, and, anyhow, 
Ave'd best move on." 

She slid down, got into her rain coat 
and hurried toward home. , 

"How- did you like that?" a taunting 
voice called after her and turning Xorma 
saw Celia, Grace and Eleanor follow^ing 
her. She ran round the nearest corner. 
Reaching her room she threw herself 
dow'U, her cheeks still tingling. 



The responsible part of a structure is 
not in the ornamented arches or the 
heaven-piercing tower, but in the foun- 
dation, where it receives little recogni- 
tion from the world. The structure of 
society shares the same fate. 



EDMOND RONAYNE'S LETTER. 

Harrison, Ark., Aug. 19, 1907. 
Editor Cynosure : 

Through 4:he courtesy of Mr. A. J. 
Millard, of Little Rock, this State, I have 
received a copy of the current number of 
the Cynosure, and I want to say that 
wdiile every article in it is w^orthy of com" 
mendation, yet the impromptu address by 
Rev. H. W. Stough is of itself alone 
w^orth many times more than the sub- 
scription price of the magazine. Surely 
he struck the nail on the head when he 
declared, "I think I had been a minister 
a long wdiile before I discovered that not 
all preaching we call preaching the gos- 
pel is really and truly gospel preaching." 
This surely is only^too true, what is be- 
ing preached in a majority of cases to- 
day as tJie gospel is not "the gospel of 
God" at all nor anything like it. How^ 
can a minister who is a Mason or Odd 
Fellow or Knight of Pythias, or who be- 
longs to any other so-called secret order 
preach the gospel of Christ? He cannot 
do it ; there is no Christ in the religion of 
the lodge, and the Masonic minister lives 
up to only one religion, and that the re- 
ligion of Masonry — a Christless religion. 
"For I determined not to know anything 
among you" — declares the great apostle 
of the Gentiles — "save Jesus Christ and 
Him crucified." L Cor. 2: 2. Where is 
the lodge minister who dares to make 
such a declaration as that in open lodge, 
whether Masonic or any other? He dare 
not do it, they'd expel him so quickly for 
a violation of the most fundamental law 
of Masonry that he'd scarcely know what 
happened to him. What Mr. Stough 
also said as to "the character of Satan" 
w^as very appropriate and to the point. 
''Do you believe in a Supreme Being?" 
you are asked as you enter upon the pre- 
paratory ceremonies of Masonic initia- 
tion, or initiation into any other so-called 
secret order. "I do," replies the minis- 
ter. Yes, and so does Satan. Satan can 
beat any Masonic minister on earth aji 
to his belief in a Supreme Being, but 
with this added difi:"erence : Satan be- 
lieves what the Supreme Being says, the 
Masonic minister does not, or if he does 
really believe all that God says, then he 
wilfully casts that belief aside, for in a 



?>ei)te)iil)er, 1007. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



133 



very few minutes you behold him stand- 
ing at the open door of the lodge room, 
semi-nude, blindfolded, and with a rope 
around his neck, and declaring before the 
assembled erowd that he has been "a 
long time in darkness and now seeks to 
be brought to light." "Thou believest 
that there is one God" — my dear Alason- 
ic minister — "thou doest well: the devils 
also believe and tremble." Jas. 2 : k;. 
But who ever knew a Masonic minister 
to tremble at God's unchanging word 
and still remain a ]\Iason ? Were Satan 
to. appear in the United States to-mor- 
how in human form and make applica- 
tion to a Masonic lodge for initiation he 
would be received with open arms, but 
only on the same ground as the minister 
is received, namely, "belief in a Supreme 
Being.'' I really believe that the com- 
ing antichrist, the man of Sin, the Son of 
Perdition, will be a Freemason, but 
whether this be so or not, I am persuad- 
ed beyond all doubt, that the religion of 
antichrist and the religion of Freema- 
sonry and all its foul blood will be iden- 
tically the same. I would like to see 
Rev. Stough's address in tract form and 
scattered by the million copies. 

E. Ronavne. 



PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 

Dear Fathers and Brethren — The pre- 
ceding letter from Brother C. B. Ward, 
who has been for about thirty years a 
missionary in India, seems to me of the 
utmost importance. I trust that if you 
have not read it you will do so. And 
that I may somewhat aid you to see 
the desperate character of the lodge 
movement, and the correspondence of 
that movement in India with the same 
movement in our own country, I beg 
your attention to the following points : 

First. Note what he says about the 
prevalence of Masonry in that heathen 
land : "This is certainly a lodge-ridden 
land," etc. Now India is in substance 
pagan. It is true tliat Christianity lins 
made some progress ; but the old re- 
ligions still rule most of the people ; and 



tlie Europeans who are in that countr}', 
aside from the missionary forces, are in 
some respects more pagan than the 
I)agans themselves. Every missionary 
with whom I speak tells me that the 
greatest trouble in heathen lands is with 
the wicked people from Christian coun- 
tries. Within a few days a lady was 
in my home who has been for more than 
tvventy-five years a missionary in Africa. 
She says that twenty-five years ago it 
looked as if Africa were to become 
Christian; and that to-day missions can- 
not hold their ground. And the trouble 
is with the godless white men who bring 
tlieir liquor drinking, and their vices to 
corrupt and destroy the natives. 

It is that kind of a country which is 
lodge ruled. When our own country is 
lodge ruled, it will be like that one. The 
religion of a nation determines its morals. 
Xo nation can permanently be better than 
xhQ religion which it practices. Lodgism 
if pag'an in character necessarily har- 
monizes with other forms of paganism. 
■\\^e cannot see this so well in our own 
country as we can in India. Let us not 
forget it. 

You will notice also what O^Ir. Ward 
s'lys respecting the politicians and ix)liti- 
cal preachers who come to India. As 
soon as they land, pressure is brought 
^,c bear on them to bring them into the 
lodges. "If a governor or Lord Bishop 
arrives who chances not to be a ^lason, 
he is soon convinced he must be." This 
is singular; but it is in exact corre- 
spondence with the wa}' things work in 
our own country, ^len of strong cliar- 
acter are not lodge men naturally. They 
depend on themselves and if the}- secure 
loft\- positions attain them by the favor 
of God, and their own exertions. Such 
ii'en are oftentimes kindly in spirit, and 
arc willing to listen to other men, and 
m:\\ be led where the^• could not be 



134 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1907. 



cl/iven. President Roosevelt, and Mce 
President Fairbanks are of this type. 
President Roosevelt was not, I believe, 
when elected, connected with the Masonic 
lodge. But fairly inaugurated, the Ma- 
sojis were after him, and finally secured 
liis membership ; and then got him to 
take more degrees. 

They probably treated him as a gentle- 
man. There is no reason to suppose that 
th.e} stripped and haltered and hood- 
winked him as they do poor young fel- 
lows who cannot be of so large service 
as stool pigeons. Lodgism, like other 
forms of paganism, will do anything to 
get on. They have no abiding princi- 
p'es. As the RiUe T^r.ys of the "strange 
A\oman,*' so it is true of the strange re- 
ngion, "Tier ways arc changeable that 
thou canst not know them." 

Governors and Pishops who C'jire cut 
to India free from lodge membership 
are urged to join, and do join, in order 
that they may stand well with the people 
of India. One day last week I went 
through a Wisconsin town, where tliere 
is a Presbyterian church. The man who 
preached in that church on Sabbath told 
]iie that there were seven men connect- 
ed with that churcb, and over one hun- 
dred women. A friend of mine who is 
conversant with a neighbor town told 
me that there are more illegitimate chil- 
dren growing up in that town than in 
any other place she had ever heard of. 
In the second town as in the first, lodges 
are strong, and churches are weak. 

You will observe in the third place 
w]iat Mr. Ward says about efforts to 
withstand the lodge in India. Persons 
^^']^o do such things are said to be ''un- 
wise," to be ''stirring up a row," etc., 
etc. Oh, for one day of Elijah! When 
Ahab brought this same charge against 
iiim., you remember how firmly he an- 
swered, 'T have not troubled Israel, but 



tliou." In fact, it is not the people who 
rebuke sin who make the followino- 
trouble, it is the people who commit it, 
who tolerate it, who defend it. 

What right have lodge men to bring 
the pagan ceremonies of their orders 
into the house of God ; to flaunt the em- 
blems of their pagan societies in the 
faces of God's people ; to stand in re- 
ligious assemblies with the mark of the 
beast hung upon them for all to see? 
Yet they do this, and if any one rebukes 
them they say they are making trouble, 
it is this way in India ; it is so every- 
where. 

The rebels when they were seeking to 
destroy our nation said that all they 
cis]:ed was to be let alone. That is all 
the devil asks, and that is all the devil's 
people ask. But God will not let them 
alone, and God's people have no right 
to let them alone. It is our duty to save 
them if we can, and if not to make pub- 
lic protest against their paganism, that 
the ignorant and the unwary may be 
saved. - - 

Please read Brother Ward's letter 
again. As you do so, you will observe 
that a certain person said Masonry was 
very good in America, but bad in India ; 
so that while they fellowshiped the or- 
ganization at home, they would not fel- 
lowship its brandy suppers and general 
demoralization abroad. W> have here 
also an exact parallel in our own coun- 
try. In multitudes of instances men have 
said to me, "I am a Mason, but am not 
affiliated with the lodge in this town be- 
cause of the character of the Masons. In 
the town where I lived the Masons were 
a reputable class of people. They were 
not infidels, nor drunkards nor adulter- 
ers. But out here things are different; 
so I never go, and never say anything 
about the organization." Masons have 
said this to me over and again. But 



September, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



I3r 



when these friends go to India they tell 
the Hindus ihow excellent and virtuous 
Masonry is in America ; and how base 
and unworthy it is, comparatively, in 
India. 

Of course, Masonry must' be afifected 
by the Christian teaching of American 
civilization. Sixty or seventy thousand 
churches teaching each w^eek the sin of 
drunkenness and uncleanness must pro- 
duce a vast impression upon the public 
mind. The lodge which wishes to live 
by the side of these churches — yes, even 
to supplant them, cannot be as base and 
Ignoble as it can inider other circum- 
stances. 

But the difference between Christianitv 
and pagan religions is this : Christianity 
makes bad men and bad communities 
good. Paganism has no such vitalizing 
pow'ers. All the good there is in it, it 
must absorb from its environment. When 
left to itself it works death. The one 
who has not the Son of God has not 
the Father. The prayers which he offers 
are oft'ered to Satan, and he becomes like 
the God he w^orships. 

But notice again that Brother Ward 
says there was a veteran Christian in 
India who w^as known to have been a 
Mason once, but who had no connection 
whatever with the order there. People 
wanted to know how^ this came about, 
and he told them that he had found 
Masonry to involve such a lot of tom- 
foolery that he felt ashamed of himself, 
and that he never spoke about the mat- 
ter. From one side of the question this 
might seem quite right ; but from an- 
other point of view we must raise a 
question. Free Masonry is as bad for 
other young men as it is for him. If 
he should have been ashamed of it, they 
should. And how can he justify him- 
self, and hoW' can he keep silent while 
such an organization is entrapping young- 



men by the thousands every year. I say 
such an organization — I might as well 
say such organizations, for as I have so 
often reminded you, all lodges are alike 
in their essential character. They are 
all alike in their influence. Lodges in 
high school, lodges in colleges, lodges 
among' business men, so far as they are 
lodges are doing the same desperate 
work. 

A gentleman recently told me that hi> 
lodge had not hurt him because he very 
seldom w^ent to it. Of course, if men 
will stay away from their lodges, they 
will avoid their evil reactions. But wdiat 
can they say of their example. This 
very man who said his lodge did not hurt 
him because he did not attend it, used his 
influence to draw other men into the 
lodge he did not care to attend. 

In the sixth place, you will observe 
wdiat Brother Ward said of a certain 
Bishop w^ho was "feted and feasted," in 
Ceylon, and wdio wdien he got to Cal- 
cutta was disappointed because the Ma- 
sons did not make as much fuss over 
him there as they had in the island. One 
of the great motives wdiich leads men 
into lodges is the desire to be ''feted and 
feasted." Anything for prominence — 
anything to get into the newspapers, to 
be talked about. Years ago a noted 
evangelist was conducting* a conference 
in Chicago. He put a prominent Mason 
on his program to give the welcoming- 
address. I said to him, "Brother, why 
did YOU put a man of that type into this 
position? He is not in sympathy at all 
with the work you are doing." He re- 
plied, "I know that, and I did not want 
him. But when he heard that we were 
to have the conference, he wrote to me 
sa}'ing that wc should need to have some 
one deliver the welcoming aldress, and 
that he would be willing to do it for us." 
Only a little while ago a lodge man of 



180 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Se;>rt'mber. i; 



another denomination took pains to write 
letters to the members of his ecclesiasti- 
cal body, asking- that they send him as 
a delegate to a national meeting. An- 
other prominent lodge man. of still an- 
other church, is continually in tlie public 
eye — not apparently because of any spe- 
cial power in Christian work. h\it because 
he seeks such notoriety. This Bishop 
wanted to have dinners made for him. 
and receptions organized, and he rebuked 
the Free ]\Iasons of Calcutta because ther 
did not thus distinguish him. It is a 
sad thing to hear, and we ought to prav 
that we may be delivered from such 
vanity. 

But again, this letter says that the 
writer has known many men who as 
soon as they are converted left the 
lodges. This is like the effect of Chris- 
tian faith in our own coimtrv. There 
are thousands of secret societv members 
who being converted abandon their or- 
ders at once. The reverend associate 
pastor of the Chicago Avenue Church is 
an example of this large class. AMien 
he was a dissolute, reckless man. actuallv 
a danger to the Hves of people in his 
town, he was a }Tason. an Odd Fellow. 
and a Knight of Pythias. I do not know 
but that he held membership in one or 
two other orders. But as soon as he 
was converted and received the Holv 
Spirit, he abandoned tlie whole list. Un- 
like some persons who do this, he has 
been from - the beginning a brave and 
true witness, seeking to save others fron.i 
the trap into which he. when an ungod- 
ly man. had fallen. 

I wish also you would note the para- 
graph in Mr. AA"ard's letter, where he 
speaks of the way in which the lodge 
can be used for selhsh purposes. ■"Ma- 
sonry is made eitective use of in this 
empire for selfish purposes.'" "Tt is 
much harder for a man not a ^Mason to 



get employment, than for one who is a 
]\Iason."" "An official who is not a ^lasoii 
is not welcomed in society as he would 
bv^ if he were a }^Iason." "ALasonrv is 
used to help ^lasons in official prefer- 
ment, to the serious and unjust treat- 
ment of others not 2\Iasons. The facts 
are so strong that few young men do not 
feel that success demands that thev get 
into the order as a mere matter of 
polic}'.'" I do not quote the words, but 
the substance of his paragraph. You can 
read it again for yourselves. How true 
this is everywhere. The explanation is 
simple. Satan is the god of this wor'd. 
He appeals to worldly n:otives. and he 
kves worldly living. But the man who 
acts from worldly motives, and becomes 
a man of the world will burn with the 
\vorld : and as Christian men we have no 
riglit to be silent regarding such a fear- 
some institution. 

In the ninth place, please observe what 
th.e letter says respecting the change of 
tlie sacred book in a given lodge. \\'e 
have all known that the ?\Iasonic lodges 
use the Bible simiply as a piece of furni- 
ture. Lodge law teaches that in a Mo- 
hammedan lodge the Koran would prop- 
erly lie on the altar, in a Mormon lodg'e 
the hook of IVIormon. in a Parsee lodge 
the Zendavesta. and in an Indian lodge 
one of the Shastras. This is ancient 
history. But here in India we have the 
practical result of this teaching wrought 
out before our eyes. A Christian comes 
into the lodge, and a Bible lies upon the 
altar. A Hindu is to be initiated, and 
the Bible is taken away and a Shastra 
is in its place. A Parsee comes in for 
reception, and the Shastra is removed, 
the Zendavesta replacing it. A IMoham- 
medan is about to be initiated. Put the 
Zendavesta aside and place the Koran on 
the altar. Some IMormon has come to 
tliat portion of the country and desires 



Septemher. I'.Xi 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



13" 



to secure the seln^il opporiunities which 
Mas^jnn- affords. He is received, but 
- the Book of Momion Hes on the altar 
when he is obhgated. And all these peo- 
ple together with savages who may 
chance to have been initiated are said 
to worship the same God. To quote 
from a lodge poet 

"In one iminortal throng we view 
Christian and Pagan, Greek and Tew. 
AVith all their doubt and darkness o"er 
One single Gjd they now adore." 

But evidently this is not the God of 
the Bible. It is not the God and Fatlier 
of our Lord Jesus Christ. He dc^es not 
' join in any hodge podge religious serv- 
ice of tliis kind. He is the only living 
and true God. He made the heavens 
and the earth, and all things tliat are 
therein. He lifts up nations, and casts 
them down. He requires men to come 
to Him humbly, confessing their sins. 
accepting Christ as Lord and Savior. 
and living according to the Word which 
He has given. 

But the Masonic lodge in India is like 
the lMas«jnic Lodge in the United Stares. 
in England, and ever\'^vhere else. It 
dc»es not worship G:»d through Jesus 
Christ : and therefore it can worship its 
god any way it chooses. But this God 
is not the true and loving God, he is 
the god of this world, that old serpent 
the devil, who deceives the nations of 
the eanh. 

I have but a single word to say in 
conclusion. You will obser^'e what 
Brother \\'ard says respecting the need 
of literature in that country- . By all 
nieans send it to him. This writing will 
fall tinder the eye of s^ome one man or 
woman who can easily do it all. But re- 
member that all over our countrv-. East, 
A\'est. Xorth and South, there are com- 
munities which are beinor reduced to the 



Hnidu standard of religion and morals. 
Churches are dying. Sabbath schools are 
dying, ministers are disheartened. sal'>ons 
are flourishing, clubs are flourishing, 
gambling dens are flourishing; and be- 
hind and under all these evil movements 
in the towns are the secret societies which 
have religion enough to satisfy the un- 
regenerate mind, but have not the true 
religion which makes those alive who 
have been dead in trespasses and sins. 
Sincerely and fraternally yours. 

Charles A. Blaxchard. 



MISSIONS AND MASONRY. 

Telingana-Bastar Mission. 
Yellandu. India. Sept. 4, 1906. 
Rev. W. I. Phillips, Editor C\Tiosure: 

Dear Ero. — Your kind letter received 
recently. I am unable to keep up all my 
correspondence as I shotdd, but I do 
feel that I must respxond to your appeal. 
I have sometimes thought perhaps my 
letters did not afford many of your 
readers much of interest. There is lit- 
tle of reform work on the line you work 
upon in aU this empire. This is cer- 
tainly a lodgc-ndcd land. So wholly 
is the country in the grip of secret so- 
cieties that if a Governor or "Lord 
Bishop" arrive who chancedi not to be 
a ""^^lason" he is soon convinced he 
:::ust be and is led in the usual way. 

.Among the missionaries, especially 
those of the most spiritual stamp, there 
are a good many who realize the charac- 
ter of secrecy sufliciently to keep out of 
all such oath-bound societies. But few 
are the men indeed who feel that there 
is any great gain in speaking out against 
oath-bound secrecy. Privately. I do not 
know that many do not fail to give ad- 
vice to young men to keep out if they 
would be real Giristians. During the 
last year I have had several calls for 
anti-secret literature from Parsees. One 
such order came from Gujerat. Another 
from far-awav Burmah. 

The effort to do reform work in In- 
dia along tliese lines would be promptly 
branded as unwise, *" stirring up a row.'' 
Xot many years ago a native brother 
who sold books on railway platforms 



i;">8 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUKE. 



September, 100' 



took some anti-^Iasonic literature along. 
Iiinncdiafcly he was a marked man and 
manv were down on him and he was 
compelled to desist from selling anti- 
secret literature or give up the railway 
platform as a sphere of action. 

An American missionary who came to 
India in recent years, held up the idea 
that ]\Iasonry in America was a vir- 
tuous institution, and made bold to 
mingle with India Masons somewhat, 
for a time, and told them at a banquet 
that with their brandy banquets they 
were miles behind their American 
brethren. A lady of my acquaintance 
wdio knew somewhat of Masonic "turn- 
ine from labor to refreshments" in 

America, said: ''Bro. does not 

know American ^Masonry very long 
yet." 

1 am fairly well acquainted with the 
make-up of the more than one hundred 
Methodist missionaries in this empire. 
There are a few of them who were Ma- 
sons in America. But I do not know 
one who openly and regularly affiliates 
with the institution in India. There is 
living in the North still a venerable 
Methodist veteran who was noticed to 
keep rather away from the Masons in 
India, though he was known to have 
met with them in America. A -good 
brother, now a Missionary Bishop, asked 
him one day why he never had any- 
thing to say of Masonry and kept out 
of it out here, though he was a mem- 
ber of the fraternity. He replied, 'T'll 
tell you. I joined in America and when 
I saw what a lot of tomfoolery it was 
I felt so ashamed of myself I never 
speak of the matter." Some years back 
Bishop Walden was feted and feasted 
by the Masons of Ceylon. In Calcutta 
no such honor ( ?) was accorded him. 
He told the delinquent friends at a din- 
ner table of the magnificent way he was 
received as a high Mason among Cey- 
lon's spicy breezes, not forgetting to 
mention that Calcutta had not risen to 
its privilege (?) so nobly. An elder 
brother, once a Mason, after dinner took 
the Bishop to one side and in great con- 
fidence said, ''Bishop, if I were you I 
would not mention that Ceylon affair 
any more in India." The Bishop in- 



quired why. "Well, they are not a very 
respectable lot out here in India to as- 
sociate with." 

Men of noblest rank officially are 
Masons. Masonry overshadows every 
other society of an oath-bound nature 
here. In fact we hear of little if any- 
thing else in the secret line. Labor or- 
ganizations have not taken root here 
much yet. But for bibulous and loose 
conduct the sacred institution of Mason- 
ry has a name wide as the empire. 
Praying men get out soon, or cease to 
pray in spirit and truth. I do honestly 
doubt if a converted man can mingle 
in Masonic associations here and walk 
in the sunshine of experimental religion. 
He may pray and keep up a prayer-book 
religion. But to enjoy constant com- 
m.union with Him who "did nothing in 
secret" he cannot. A score I have known- 
in my 30 years in India who when con- 
verted have walked out of Masonry for- 
ever. 

Masonry is made efifective use of in 
this empire for selfish purposes. I ad- 
mit it is much harder for a man not 
a Mason to get employment than for 
one who is a Mason. I admit that an 
official who is not a Mason is not wel- 
comed in society as he would be as a 
Mason. I have seen proof that Masonry 
is used to help Masons in official pre- 
ferment to the serious and unjust treat- 
ment of others not Masons. The facts 
are so strong that few young men do 
not feel that success demands that they 
get into the order as a matter of sheer 
policy. 

One thing true Christians ought 
to take note of in this country. 
Namely, the non-scriptural commingling 
involved. I know personally Moham- 
medan Masons, Parsee Masons, Hindu 
Masons, Infidel Masons, immoral Ma- 
sons, Christian M^asons ( ?) who are 
mingling every week in lodge together. 
At least one of those lodges changed a 
by-law and swears incomers on "the 
sacred book of his own religion" as he 
comes in. A Hindu on his Shaster, a 
Mohammedan on the Koran, a Parsee 
on the Zendavesta and a Christian on 
the Bible. And to one another they are 
able to say with equal piety "Amen." 



September, 1007. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



139 



And a Masonic lodge in India without 
brandy I have not heard of in 30 years. 
I heard an American Mason say he had 
heard that Masons in India "began 0)i 
the table and ended under it." 

It is not pleasant to have to say these 
severe things. But the truth demands 
it. I love the faithful loving spirit in 
which President Blanchard deals with 
the secret kingdom. It is not men we 
must fight. They are our brothers. But 
wickedness, into which most men are 
unwarily led. Once captivated they find 
it hard to break away. So far as lies 
in my power I have, as did Wallace J. 
Gladwin, with whom I worked for many 
years in the India Watchman Book De- 
pot work, have tried to do all I could 
to counteract the evil of secrecy and 
scatter enlightening literature. So may 
it ever be my lot to do. 

Several times in the past Cynosure 
friends have helped me with literature. 
I should be glad if some generous 
friend would donate $100 worth of anti- 
secret literature for use in India. I am 
[■ .a busy missionary with far more on 
[ hand than one man ought to try, yet I 
-cannot withhold my hand in this fray. 
If the Lord put it into the heart of any 
friends to send me the literature, I will 
'^ ask Bro. Phillips to select and forward 
it", and as is possible I will scatter. Two 
hundred copies of Woodruff Post's 
last blozv at secrecy are being read be- 
tween the Himalyas and Cape Comerin. 
The work must be followed up. Prayer 
must be offered and the holy war prose- 
cuted in the love that inspired the heart 
of Jesus Christ. His name is rejected 
by Masons in some ''degrees," but we 
must exalt it ever, and under it do all 
our doing. Let India be remembered. 
Your brother in Christ. 

. - (Rev.) C. B. Ward, 

Missionarv. 



There are heavy crosses to be bon:e 
in the midst of the streets of the city, 
but none amidst the glory of the streets 
of gold. 



What if no prayer ascends for me 
In all this world of sin ; 

God's hand is on the jasper gate- 
He bids me enter in. 



BABI AND EPISCOPAL UNION. 

Mohammedan and Christian Funeral 

Rites foi' Chicagoan. 

New York, June 4. — A double funeral 
service was held over the body of the 
late Dr. Chester I. Thacher, a retired 
physician of Chicago. The ritual for the 
dead of the Babi, a Persian sect, was first 
read, and after that the Protestant Epis- 
copal service for the dead. Dr. Thacher 
was one of the leaders of the Babi faith 
in this country, hence the oriental cere- 
mony. 

The doctor's son, Dr. Fielding J. 
Thacher of Chicago, and his sister-in- 
law, Mrs. J. A. Cozzins of this city, in 
whose house the funeral took place, are 
Episcopalians. It was in deference to 
their wishes that the Episcopalian ser- 
vice was held. Dr. Fielding Thacher 
and another relative, W. J. Toomey, 
both of Chicago, reached this city ]\Iay 
15 from a trip around the world. Dr. 
Chester Thacher came to meet them and 
died here suddenly Friday evening. 

About a dozen adherents of the Babi 
faith attended the services. Dr. Thach- 
er was buried here. He adopted the 
Babi faith during the congress of relig- 
ions at the World's Fair in Chicago in 
1893. Seyed Mohammed A\\ founded 
the faith in 1843. ^^ is based on Mo- 
hammedanism. 



''Come out from among them and be 
ye separate." 2 Cor. 6: 17. 

"Ye cannot be partakers of the Lord's 
table, and of the table of devils." I, Cor. 



10: 21. 



Rev. B. F. Delo, of the M. E. Church, 
now seventy-five years old. is Grand 
Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Masons 
in Pennsylvania. Probably a tract or a 
word might have saved this man. if he 
had received it in earlv manhood. What 
a wonderful position for good is that of 
a true minister of Christ ! His influence 
goes out in thousands of ways for saving 
and benefiting his fellow men. What an 
awful record will those have who "have 
fellowship with devils." while posing as 
ministers of God ! What a train of evil 
consequences will be their reward ! 



140 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 190' 




CHINESE MASONIC LODGE. 



CHINESE MASONIC FUNERAL. 

The elaborate ceremonies arranged for 
the burial of Wong Chee Chung, the 
33d degree member of the Chinese Free 
Masons of Boston, who was killed in 
the recent Tong fight in Chinatowri\ 
were enhanced yesterday by services in 
honor of Leong Quen, who died last 
Monday of heart disease, following ex- 
liaustion from the heat while attending 
the funerals of the first tliree victims C'f 
the feud last Sunday. 

Wong Chee Chung was the most ad- 
vanced Chinese Mason in New England, 
and Leong Quen was also a member of 
the lodge. 

The rites accorded Wong Chee Chung, 
whose rank was so honorable that his 
rcm.ains were held over for two weeks 
in order that they might be inter-cd 
with appropriate circumstance, were by 
fr.r the most impressive ever witnessed 
in Boston. Thousands of white persons 
v.Titched the ceremony from beyond the 
jxrlice lines, and more than 4,000 Chi- 
nese, many of them from outside points, 
paid their tribute to the dead men. 
Among the delegations of Chinese Ma- 
sons was a large body from New York, 
and practically every Chinese Mason of 



any rank in New England was present. 

Capt. Cain, of station 4, with 50 men, 
policed the section, but there was no 
trouble. 

Grand Master Officiated. 

The services were conducted by Moy 
Ding Quin, grand master of the Chinese 
Free Masons in the East. At 12 o'clock 
the caskets containing the bodies of the 
dead men were brought from Lewis 
Jones & Sons' undertaking rooms on La 
Grange street to the cleared space in 
front of the Masonic Temple on Harri- 
son avenue. They were placed on stands 
about three feet apart and about as far 
from the sidewalk. The flowers were 
then placed on the caskets. One of the 
tributes was a large set piece, a gift fromx 
the lodge, on the top of which was a 
dove. In the center, surrounded by flow- 
ers, was a photograph of Wong Shee 
Chung. Between the two caskets stood 
a Chinaman holding aloft a large canopy 
of the Masonic lodge. On each side of 
the caskets were stationed two oflicers 
of' the lodge, in yellow gowns who held 
lurid banners. On both sides of the 
street officers and members of the lodge, 
in fancy costumes, were gathered. The 
wardens and deacons were dressed in 



September. 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



141 



purple, the junior officers in yellow and 
the senior officers in purple and white. 
The grand master wore a gown of white 
and red. 

About seven feet from the caskets an 
altar was erected with candles and sym- 
bolic ornaments, and in front of this 
was a table containing offerings of food 
to serve the spirits of the dead luitil 
they reached the land beyond. Among 
the offerings on this table were roast 
pig, roast fowls, birds' nests, sliced 
chicken and ham and a large variety of 
fancy Chinese dishes. 

Prayed on Mats in Street. 

Beyond the altar three mats wtrt 
placed upon the street about three feet 
apart, on which the three assistants of 
the grand master knelt and prayed dur- 
ing the services. These mats represent- 
ed the three hells which the spirits of 
the dead men pass through. A musician 
dressed in ordinary Chinese clothes stood 
near these mats and played the "'diddo.'' 

At a given signal the forward covers 
of the caskets were removed and the 
dead men's faces were revealed. The 
musician started the weird music and 
then the grand master began to chant. 
He w^s assisted in the ceremony by 3.Ioi 
Xi Wong and Chin Jai Eng, two mem- 
bers of the lodge. The strange ceremony 
took almost an hour and it was watched 
by the hundreds of spectators in perfect 
silence. The coremony consisted of 
prayers on the three mats and the many 
offerings to the gods. Innumerable joss 
sticks were burned to charm away evil 
spirits. 

After the ceremony had been perform- 
ed a funeral march was played by an 
American band. It was the first appjar- 
arce of an American band at a Chinese 
funeral in Boston. 

The casket containing the body of 
Leong Ouen was then placed in its 
hearse and carried to Beach street to 
await the conclusion of the grand cere- 
nx-nies in honor of Wong Chee Chung. 
A large number of Chinese dressed m 
•gowns of diff'erent colors assisted at the 
ceremony. 

After this was finished the procession 
to ]\It. Hope cemetery, where the bodies 
were buried, l>egan. 



Band Led Procession. 

The procession was headed by a band, 
followed by Aloy Harii Sect on a white 
horse. He wore a georgeous uniform 
and carried two banners. The hearse 
containing the body of \\ong Chee 
Chung followed. Then came two men 
who carried two banners on which were 
inscribed the records of the two men. 
Two hacks containing the Chinese musi- 
cians and a procession of about yo hacks 
containing the relatives and "cousins" of 
the dead man followed. Alongside of 
the musicians marched a number of the 
members of the lodge, dressed in gor- 
geous colors. 

The procession marched around to 
Beach street, where the hearse contain- 
ing the body of Leong Quen joined in 
behind the other hearse, and then moved 
up Kingston street to Essex and down 
through Harrison avenue again. Thous- 
ands lined the streets as the long cor- 
tege left for the cemetery. 

All along the road little slips of paper 
were thrown out on which were foolish 
Sciyings. The Chinese believe that the 
evil spirits which follow the body stop 
to read the messages, and, waiting to 
puzzle them out, allow the departed souls 
to escape them. 

Beside the Graves. 

At the cemetery thousands gathered 
to witness the burial. Xearing the ceme- 
tery the American band played the dead 
march in ''Saul" and played until the 
graves were reached. 

The ceremony at the graves was not 
elaborate. The caskets were placed near 
the graves and the lids removed. Hun- 
dreds gathered around and took tlieir 
farewell glimpse of the dead men before 
tlie lids were replaced. 

The roasted pig and fowd, together 
witli a lot of other food, were placed in 
a kiln built for the purpose, and burned. 

The orrand master o^ave the signal and 
tlie caskets were lowered into the grave. 
As the first earth fell food and papers 
were thrown in to rest the sotds. 

The procession then started homeward 
ciud arrived in Boston about 5 p. m. All 
evening there was much feasting around 
Chinatown in honor of the dead men. 
--Boston Herald, August 19. 1907. 



142 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



SeptemT3€r, 1907. 



The National Anniversary 

Thursday and Friday, June 13th and 14th, 1907. 
(Contiuued from July and August Numbers.) 



DEVOTIONAL SERVICES. 

Rev. J. P. Stoddard: We are to 
have this evening's messages from the 
throne of God preached by the servants 
of God, men who are accustomed to pre- 
vail with God in prayer, men who know 
the voice of the Spirit because they have 
heard it ; but the most distinguished per- 
son we are to have to speak to us to- 
night has put His message in the chap- 
ter a portion of which J wiU read to 
you; and beloved, do not think of Him 
as away beyond the blue, think of Him 
as here"^ think of Him as real, more real 
than Brother Day, who is to speak to 
us. I believe that God is in this place, 
and I propose to read some of His 
words in the opening of this service, that 
we may have a direct and personal mes- 
sage from the Son of God; and let us 
bear in mind that they are spoken to 
us, and that He is here speaking them! 
I am simply taking the words that He 
has left, and have sought wisdom from 
Him. to present to you His Message out 
of His book. We read in the loth 
chapter of Matthew, beginning with the 
i6th verse: "Behold, I send you forth 
as sheep in the midst of wolves; be ye 
therefore wise as serpents, and harm- 
less as doves." 

Some of us can remember when we 
had to go forth in defense of— to free 
a portion of the people of America. The 
''underground railroad" before the war 
ran through Wheaton; it had a station 
up here at Stacey's Corners. We had to 
go forth as sheep in the midst of wolves, 
trust in God. Brother Deveneau was 
speaking the other night in our meeting 
in Boston. His subject was "Out of 
Romanism into Infidelity, and Out of In- 
fidelity to Christ." He was born of 
Roman Catholic parents, was educated 
in that fold, and was as zealous, if pos- 
sible, as Saul was in the persecution of 
saints; but he found nothing to satisfy 
the cravings of his immortal spirit. 
Then he turned to infidelity; and later, 



being brought by the providence of God 
into contact with Spirit-filled Christians, 
he gave up his infidelity and gave his 
heart to Christ. He then felt he had to 
tell the glad tidings. He felt that he had 
not only to present Christ, but to testify 
against the enemies of Christ. He said 
he met with a great deal of persecution 
when he came out of the Roman Catho- 
lic church ; and when the Lord laid upon 
him to testify against the Lodge, as he 
did in Wheaton a few years ago, it cost 
him a good deal of sacrifice and trouble. 
Wlien the Lord laid it upon him to tes- 
tify against the secret lodges, it caused 
opposition, and brought out persecution 
which he said far surpassed anything 
that he had ever received from the Cath- 
olic church when he left that. He said, 
"Tlie lodge is doing more to undermine 
me in iiiy evangelistic work, more to 
hinder the progress of. the gospel in this 
New England city, it is doing more to 
cripple me in every way than Roman- 
ism, a hundredfold." 

We shall be in the midst of salvation, 
though our enemy is all about us. He 
is not visible to us, however. I said to 
a lady recently, who said she believed 
in God but did not believe in the devil — ■ 
I said to her : "I used to hunt coons, and 
when I saw a coon track I knew there 
had been a coon around. I knew it was 
not a sheep or a wolf, it was a coon. 
Sometimes I would follow the coon 
track until I found the coon, but wheth- 
er I followed it or not, I knew the coon 
was around. And I have seen plenty of 
tracks of the devil dowai here in Cin- 
cinnati." So with this institution that 
we are opposing and which we are spe- 
cially met here to consider in this con- 
vention. The devil is around us; there 
are plenty of indications of his presence; 
and we ,are not out as deep in the midst 
of salvation as we might be. "Be ye 
therefore wise as serpents and harmless 
as doves." Who sends us? The Lord 
Jesus Christ. Are you, brother or sis- 



September, irX)' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



14.- 



ler, afraid to go forth with any message 
that He has sent you to clehver? Are you 
afraid to stand in any position where He 
places you? Are you afraid to fight 
any foe which He calls }ou to encoun- 
ter when He says, "Lo, I am with you?" 
Do you remember his precious words in 
the loth chapter of John's Gospel, the 
4th verse, that "When He putteth forth 
His own sheep He goeth before them?" 
Are you afraid to follow such a Lead- 
er as that? You know when Grant, the 
Napoleon of America, had an army on 
the battlefield, they had confidence in 
their general and they would follow him 
to the bloody angle. They would follow 
him wherever he led, and would obey his 
orders, because they had -confidence in 
him. Have you any confidence in the 
Lord Jesus Christ, Who is commanding 
this company here? Can you call your- 
selves Christians? Have you shrunk 
from any duty that He has laid upon 
you, or refused to obey any command, 
w^hen He says, "I go before you?" 
"When He putteth forth his own sheep, 
he goeth before them." "Behold, I send 
you forth as sheep in the midst of 
wolves." But He goes before us. Let 
us think of all these things when we 
meet in the conflict. "When He putteth 
forth His own sheep. He goeth before 
them." 

"Behold, I sertd you forth as sheep in 
the midst of wolves; be ye therefore 
wise as serpents." Wisdom comes from 
God. "Every good gift and every per- 
fect gift is from above." No man or 
woman needs wisdom more, or a greater 
enjoyment of divine grace, or a greater 
infilling of the Holy Ghost, than the man 
or woman who makes war against the 
popular sins of the day; and no man or 
woman can make headway against them 
unless strengthened by Him in the in- 
ner man, with the power that is from 
above. Be wise. That wisdom which 
overcomes is the wisdom that God gives. 

Thirty-five years ago, when I was a 
novice in this work, I used to think of 
what the soldier boys said when they 
wrote home, after they had enlisted and 
had been marching around for a time, 
and had not had a real engagement. They 
would write, "We are just spilin' for a 



fight" — an expression that was quite 
common. That described my condition 
sometimes in the early part of my work 
in the anti-secret cause; nothing pleased 
me better than to get a live Alason on 
his feet in the audience and get him to 
answer questions ; but I found by ex- 
perience that to provoke an encounter 
was to weaken my position, and it was 
really an eft'ort to see who could gain 
the mastery, and not what was the truth, 
and where right was. I learned that it 
is a better way — that there is more wis- 
dom in approaching men in mild meth- 
ods and saying, "Come, let us reason 
together," than there was in just 
doubling up your fists and attempting to 
carry the thing through by brute force. 
"A soft answer turneth away wrath." 

One night, at a place in Indiana, a 
man of the name of Stoner, a robust, 
dangerous-looking man, was present at 
a meeting where I had been speaking, 
and 1 had not given a message that was 
in accordance with the views of some 
persons in the place. When I came 
down from the pulpit, that man, at the 
head of about a dozen men, I should 
think, came up to me with his coat oft 
and his sleeves rolled up, and he seemed 
to be in for business. He shook his fist 
in my face and he used plain English. 
He said, "You are a liar!" In those days 
I felt a little more vigorous than I do 
now, and I should not have hesitated to 
grapple with that man, but God gave me 
wisdom, and I looked at him and said, 
"If what you state is true, it will be 
very hard for me, for the good book 
says (and I believe every word of it, 
and I hope you do), 'all liars shall have 
their part in the lake that burneth with 
fire and brimstone.' If you ever pray, 
won't you pray for me?" It seemed to 
take the man aback so that he did not 
know what to say. Finally, I said to 
him, "I am going to speak here in this 
pulpit, if I am alive, to-morrow night, 
and if I have said anything that is not 
true and you can show me that it is not 
true. I wdll be glad to retract it." I 
have found that a soft answer turneth 
away wrath, and it is nuich better, in 
speaking to people to use hard argu- 
ments and soft words. 



144 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



'Septem-ber, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. 

BY REV. A. C. DIXON, D. D. 

\\'hen I speak of Christian Science, I 
riSually do what I greatly dishke to do-— 
I use a manuscript. I Hke to keep cool, 
and a manuscript can keep you cooler 
than anything I know of. It is one of 
ihe best non-conductors in the world. 
And then I like to be accurate, and to be 
able to repeat afterwards exactly what 
was said. 

General Movement of Occultism. 

A glance at the general movement of 
•occultism during the past seventy years 
^\ ould not be unprofitable. 

Madam Helene P. Blavatsky was born 
in 1820, in Russia; went into India as a 
Russian spy, learned there what was 
called Philosophy, the wisdom religion, 
the pantheistic belief that everything is 
God and God is everything; she learned 
also to believe in the transmigration of 
souls. But she claims that she went into 
Thibet and discovered there a wonderful 
cavern, in which mysterious beings lived, 
called Mahatmas, who could travel 
-through the air without an airship and 
go anywhere they pleased. She came to 
this country and associated with her 
Colonel Olcutt and Annie Besant. She 
and Colonel Olcutt could sit in a warm 
room on a warm summer evening and 
welcome the Mahatmas as they came in 
at the windows in the shape of beautiful 
b)utterflies. They came in and ilew 
.around, and sometimes they wove their 
initials on corners of beautiful handker- 
chiefs, and gave the handkerchiefs to 
them. One of these Colonel Olcutt him- 
self received. Madam Blavatska was at 
a picnic with six others, and there was 
lacking one cup; she went into the 
woods and called to the Mahatmas, and 
discovered in the root of a tree a cup 
v/hich corresponded exactly in design 
with the six she had; so there was no 
difficulty even in meeting this test. 
Madam Blavatska was easy of manner 
und morals ; she was a cigarette-smoker ; 
and that is the index to a great deal. The 
break in her character — and it was fear- 
f^^l_was the cause of the disintegration 
of the movement which she started. 

Colonel Olcutt, I believe, is now living 
in India, and here and there are rem- 



nants of philosophies that try to hold on 
to the old cult. 

In 1848, in the town of Hydesville, 
New York, there lived a family of the 
name of Fox. In that family were two 
cliildren, Margaret and Katherine, ro-- 
licking girls ; and in their room at night 
mysterious noises were heard. The 
mother took them into her room, ^^.nd the 
noises followed. These noises answered 
questions, yes and no, and it was yery 
interesting. Anna Leah, an older sister, 
some twenty-three years older than the 
eldest of these girls, living in Rochester, 
heard of the wonders and came home, 
and she took the little children to Roch- 
ester and exhibited them in the halls and 
parlors of that city. They were in com- 
munication with the spirit world ; they 
could learn things that no one else knew. 
A committee of physicians was appoint- 
ed to examine into the claims, and they 
reported that they had carefully exam- 
ined them and found there was nothing 
especially mysterious except in the skill 
with which these girls made noises v/ith 
their knee joints. That. is a fact of rec- 
ord; but from it arose that religion, 
Spiritualism, which went over this coun- 
try like wild-fire. Anna Leah, the older 
sister, became a medium; these young 
girls were mediums ; and within five 
years there were thirty thousand me- 
diums in America. The spiritualistic 
movement spread much more rapidly 
than Christian Science. 

One of these girls, Margaret, married 
Dr. Kane, the Arctic explorer. She con- 
fessed to him before the marriage that 
she was a fraud; that she made the 
noises with the bones of her feet, not 
with the knee joint, as the doctors claim- 
ed ; and that she and her sister Kather- 
ine did it in fun, until they found out it 
was a serious matter, and then a very 
remunerative matter, and they kept up 
the deception. In the year .1888 Marga- 
ret and Katherine Fox made a written 
confession of the fraudulency of their 
claims. That confession was published 
in the New York Herald. 

After her marriage to Dr. Kane, Mar- 
garet reformed, and became a decent, re- 
spectable woman. After his sudden 
death she went back to her old ways of 



September, 190' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



145 



deception, and, poor thing, died a drunk- 
ard. But during her last years she re- 
affirmed the first confession, that all 
their claims were fraudulent, 

Mr. Sabert, of Philadelphia, a spirit- 
ualist himself, left a legacy of fifty thou- 
sand dollars to examine scientifically in- 
to the claims of spiritualism. I have in 
iny library at home now, books contain- 
ing the report of the committee, headed 
by Dr. Furness, of New York — a com- 
mittee of scientists — who swore that 
they were willing to receive any 
testimony, spiritual or material ; they 
knew they had no prejudice against 
any new discovery ; they had ex- 
amined every prominent spiritualist 
in the world — certainly in the great 
cities — from London, Xew York, 
Paris, Chicago, Philadelphia, Bos- 
ton — and the report of that committee, 
unanimously adopted, was that the claims 
of Spiritualism were fraudulent through 
and through; that not a thing was done 
in the way of tipping tables, writing on 
slates, making noises, the appearance oi 
spirits — not a thing was done that could 
not be reproduced by a sleight-of-hand 
performer, and everything that was done 
by the Spiritualists had been done in the 
presence of the committee by sleight-of- 
hand performers and had been explained 
by them. Nevertheless I think there is 
something in Spi»ritualism. I am quite 
sure the Lord Jesus Christ is not in it. 
I have never met a Spiritualist who 
would acknowledge Him as Lord, and 
I iiave looked for such a one for twenty- 
five years. That is the test; the spirit 
that confesses that Jesus Christ came in 
the flesh is of God, and the spirit that de- 
nies that fact is not of God. I believe 
there is something in spiritualism, but it 
is something on the side of darkness and 
uot of light. George C. Needham said 
in an address once that the Lord told the 
devils never to confess Him, and they 
have not done it since ; and that Spirit- 
ualism is some sort of demoniac posses- 
sion or demoniac agency. Certainly it 
13 not on the side of Jesus Christ and the 
Word of God. 

Mrs. Eddy's Interest in Occultism. 

In 1848, the year previously referred 
iiving in Con- 



cord, New Hampshire, of the name of 
^lary Baker. She was twenty-eight years 
of age when Spiritualism was born, just 
entering upon her vigorous womanhood. 
She became interested in it; she was a 
medium ; she went into trances ; she 
heard voices, as Joan of Arc did ; she was 
popular along that line among a certain 
circle of friends. You only have to read 
McClure's ^^lagazine, beginning with the 
January, 1907, number, to have all these 
facts authenticated by living witnesseiVr 
who have made their affidavits, and these 
affidavits are published. This young 
woman was peculiar ; she was nervous, 
went into tantrums, lost her temper, 
sometimes would fall in a convulsion of 
nervousness ; and her father would get 
into as great a swirl as herself, calling 
at the top of his voice that his Mary was 
dying; and when -Dr. Ladd came, his 
diagnosis was "temper and hysterics." 
The poor child could not finish her edu- 
cation after sixteen years of age because 
of that peculiar temperament. She mar- 
ried so many times it is a. little difficult 
to keep count. Her first husband was 
Doctor Patterson, I believe, or Doctor 
Glover, and then she married a Mr. Ed- 
dy. After Eddy was killed by arsenic 
poisoning, she adopted a Dr. C. J. Fos- 
ter as her own son; they had a quarrel 
and he disappeared from sight, and he 
has not come out until a few weeks ago, 
during this recent litigation. He bears 
testimony that he has been in hiding be- 
cause he knew he would be assassinated 
if found. If you will trace, in ^IcClure's 
3klagazine, the history of this rather won- 
derful mortal, ^[ts. Eddy, you will dis- 
cover something of the genius known as 
Christian Science. 

I am going to look at the subject of 
Christian Science from three points of 
view : first, in its relation to philosophy : 
second, in relation to the Bible ; and then 
in relation to science and ethics. 
Christian Science in Relation to Phil= 
osophy. 

Christian Science declares that two 
things cannot occupy the same place at 
the same time ; and as God fills all space, 
there can be therefore nothing but God : 
and as God is good, there can be nothing 
but good. You will see by a moment's 



14(J 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1907. 



tlioug-hr that this philosophy is false, tor 
i: is not true that two things cannot oc- 
cupy the same space at the same time. 
In this room at this moment are three 
things — air, light, and heat — occupying 
the same space at the same time. Ev- 
erybody is possessed of warmth, vitality, 
and matter, occupying the same space at 
the same time. 

The philosophy of Christian Science 
can be defined, however. I think : and if 
you can go with me through the line of 
proof, I think you will agree that it is 
the line art of making sane people think 
and feel as if they were insane, while 
enough sense remains to keep them from 
acting out their delusions. I think that 
is a fair definition. 

AMien a man really believes that mat- 
ter is non-existent, he tries to go through 
a brick wall, and he must be placed in a 
padded cell for his own protection. AMien 
a man really believes that sickness is 
non-existent, he refuses to quarantine 
himself when he has the smallpox : and 
the cit}'. for its protection, must coDipcI 
him to remain indoors. A\'hen a man 
really beheves that sin has no reality, 
and that therefore there is no guilt, he 
asserts the liberty to steal, or commit 
any other crime to which he may feel 
inclined ; and society is compelled to, pro- 
tect itself against iiim. AMien a man 
really beheves that death is non-existent, 
he refuses to bury his dead, and would 
keep the decaying corpse in the home of 
the living; and the health officers are 
compelled to take it in hand. I have 
had to deal with some such. 
Christian Science in Relation to the Bible. 

Some have told me that Christian 
Science has made the Bible a new book 
to them; and we can believe it. for the 
Bible they have is not the old book 
v\-hich has stood through the ages, but a 
mutilated and garbled record, as dilTer- 
ent from the real Bible as San Francisco 
after the earthquake was ditlerent be- 
fore the earthquake. I have in my room 
a book which is the Bible of Christian 
Science. I have studied it with great 
care — the first edition, that of 1888, and 
the edition of 1902. I shall qtiote from 
the later edition. The book is written 
in a stilted, artificial style, with the writ- 



ing of unreality in every page. What 
it quotes from and says about the Bible 
may be classed under two heads: first, 

contradictions : second, wrestings. 

The atithor of this book goes^ through 
the first chapters of Genesis, vaporizing 
and devitalizing their meaning, until she 
comes to the second chapter and sev- 
enth verse, which reads : "And the Lord 
God formed man of the dust of the 
ground, and breathed into his nostrils 
the breath of life : and man became a liv- 
ing soul."' Her comment on this is as 
follows: "Ts.this addition to His creation 
real or untrue? Is it true, or is it a lie 
concerning Ciod and man? It must be 
untrue : that is. it must be. a lie. for God 
personally cursed the ground. '■" 

Here the lie is given to a direct state- 
ment of Scripture, that God formed man 
of the dust of the ground. There is no- 
avoiding it. There is the fiat denial of 
its truthfulness, ^^'orse than that, we 
have in this same quotation the blas- 
phemy of the assertion that the Lord Je- 
hovah of this text is a great idol ; that 
Jehovah, the covenant-keeping God of 
Israel, is an idol. That is the teaching 
of ^Irs. Eddy. 

Let us be more specific. In Genesis 
i: I we read: 'Tn the beginning God 
created the heaven and the earth."'' On 
page 335 of the Christian Science text- 
book it is stated: ""God never created 
matter. '•' 

Here is a fiat contradiction, which no 
genius can reconcile. Both statements 
cannot be true. If the Bible speaks the 
truth. Christian Science has spoken 
falsely. If Christian Science speaks the 
truth, the Bible is false. 

In Genesis i : 2'- we read: "God creat- 
ed man in His own image, in the imago 
of God created He him*; male and female 
created He them."' On page 266 of the 
Christian Science text-book: "^lan co- 
exists with God and the universe.'" 

Another fiat contradiction, that no 
genius can reconcile : two directly oppo- 
site and irreconcilable statements. 

In Hebrews 9: 27: "It is appointed 
unto men once to die. but after this the 
judgment. ■"'' On page 291 Christian 
Science has another fiat contradiction : 
"Xo final judgment aw,aits mortals." 



^"T.-ieml^T. IfKi' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



1^7 



In Romans 12:9! rea. 



Abh 



which is evih" Page 311, Christian 
Science: '"In realm* there is no evil.'' 
Tliere is nothing to abhor. It is impos- 
sible to accept as true both of these 
statements. Either the Bible or Chris- 
tian Science is mistaken. 

In ^latthew 16:26: "'For what is a 
man profited., if he shall gain the whole 
world, and lose his own soul? or what 
shall a man give in exchange for his 
s«ju1?'" On page 311 of the text book: 
"It is the sense of sin, and not the sin- 
ful soul, which must be lost * 

I can think of no more z r:.- i.is and 
soul-destroying error than this. If one 
succeeds in destroying his sense of sin. 
he has reached the conii:.::: c f one 
whose conscience has be;:, -r.-r: as 
with a hot iron, and he can : :n: :nn: to 
sin with the feeling that sin is a virr.ie. 
This is the opiate that puts the scul to 
sleep. 

Ezekiel 18:4: "The soul that siimeth. 
it shall die." Put over against this the 
word of Christian Science on 7 - - ?: 
"Because soul is :n:n::rta!. sn . .:::t 
sin." A ilat con:r 

In J:'r.n 2:2^ tn^ ^:.y.c says; "Xow 
V.' :.. /.. vas in Jerusalem, at the pass- 

Kis nanir. -.n-::; nory -.n." ;nv nnrac.es 
which He dii." Christian Science, page 
8^: "Miracles are inipjssible in science." 
"^In Mar:hev-7:ir:esns said: "If ye 
then, being evil. ':-. i;; ■- :: ri"": ^: ; . 

- il -_r 1 :i .:' .vhich is in heaven give 
^ . . _ nnn^- :_ :ne:n that ask IHim?"' On 
page 2 of the text hook there is a denial 
: :l:is precious truth. :1 o ^"^ 'nswers 
• :•;/ -rrs. It savs : "Tl . o : plead- 

i::_ • i:i: n" : li-i::: :.::- 1. as one pleads 
^v::l: . l:n:nan ':;:n^. i:r;etuates the be- 
lief in God as himianly circumscribed 
— an error :1::.: :—^ies spiritual 
o-ro\^th." A 5:: 11 -- :lat denial: "It 
Ts vai:; - Insh to stand still and pray, 

expec:. _ rause of another*s_ good- 
ness, snltering and triumph, that we 
shall reach his harmony and reward.'' 
In that is a flat denial that if we ask 
God for something, and expe:: ::: the 
name of Jesus, it shall t-e gra: :, 
John 14:13 is the crecions p 



ise : 



"And whatsoever ye shall ask in iNIy 
name, that will I do, that the Father 
may be glorified in the Son." On page 
7 of the text book are the words : ''God 
is not influenced by man." Of course 
the god of Christian Science is not, be- 
cause it is an impersonal something; 
everything is god, and god is everything ; 
a god without a heart and without an 
ear. 

More horrible still is the denial oi the 
atonement based upon the death and 
resurrection of Jesus Christ. In He- 
brews 9:26 we have a record of the great 
fact oi the incarnation and its meaning: 
"How once in the end of the world hath 
He appeared to put away sin by the 
sacrifice of Himself." On page 2^ of 
the text bcHjk: "One sacrifice, however 
ereat. is insufiicient to pay the debt of 
sin." Here is a decree that pierces the 
very heart of the gospel of Jesus Christ. 
- lo-mans 5:1 we read the words 
.-:_: nave given joy to m.any a soul: 
"Being justified by faith, we have peace 
with God through our Lord Jesus 
Christ.'' On page 2t, of Mrs. Eddy's 
bc^'Ok is the contradiction: "The atone- 
m.ent requires constant self-imimolation 
on the sinner's part." These two state- 
ments cannot be reconciled : one directly 
contradicts the other. The words of 
Scripture offer a full salvation: tile 
words 01 Christian Science turn us to 
self-immolation as the atonemxent for sin, 
if they m.ean anything at all. 

In Romans 14:9 is the statement 
which has filled the world with joy : 
"Cho-ist both died and rose." On page 
45 o-f the text book is the contra<liction 
of this: "Jesus' students, not sutliciently 
advanced to understand their Master's 
trium^ph did not perform any wond^-ful 
works until they saw Him after His 
crucifixion, and learned that He had not 
died" — a denial of the fact oi the death 
of Jesus Christ, and afterwards of his 
resurrection. 

The contradictions of the Bible by 
Christian Science are equalled only by 
its wrestlinof and mutilation of the Divine 
Word. 

On page 19 of the Christian Science 
text book we have the words: "Jesus 
ursr- 1 •' ' "t *Thou shalt 



14S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1907. 



have no other gods before ]\Ie.' which 
may be rendered. 'Thou shalt haAX no 
behef of Hfe in matter.' " Every in- 
telhgent person knows that those words 
have no such meaning, and it looks likt 
an attempt to get rid of the sin of idola- 
try. 

On page 338 of the text book is the 
following, and I beg your attention to 
it: "The word Adam is from -the He- 
brew 'adamah,' signifying the red color 
of the ground, dust, nothingness. Divide 
the name Adam into two syllables and 
it reads, a dam, or obstruction. This 
suggests the thought of something fluid, 
of mortal mind in solution. Here 'a 
dam" is not a mere play upon words, for 
it means much. It illustrates the sep- 
aration of man from God, and the ob- 
stacle the serpent, sin, would impose be- 
tween man and his Creator." 

]\Iark Twain at his best never beat 
that as a specimen of horse-play talking, 
never in his life ; while here it is serious- 
ly given as a part of a religious system, 
a revelation from God that is to take the 
place of this old Book, His eternal 
Word. Much of the "Glossary" in 
"Science and Health," this text book, 
would really be suitable for the pages of 
a comic paper, and yet Christian Scien- 
tists commit it to memory as if it were 
valuable. Doctor Hudson is quoted as 
saying that they really lack a healthy, 
protective sense of humor. In the "Glos- 
sary'' let us see a few definitions. Hid- 
dekel (river) is ''divine science, under- 
stood and acknowledged ;" that is the 
definition of Hid dekel. Holy Ghost is 
the next word after Hiddekel, and is also 
defined as ''divine science." The Holy 
Spirit is Christian Science — "the devel- 
opments of eternal Life" — so that, ac- 
cording to' the geometrical axiom, 
"things which are equal to the same 
thing are equal to each other," the river 
Hiddekel is the same as the Holy Ghost. 

Mother is defined as "God" in this 
glossary — which is very significant, in 
view of the fact that Mrs. Eddy has de- 
m.anded of her followers that she, and 
she alone, shall be called "Mother" in 
all the Christian Science world. Purse 
IS defined as "laying up treasures in 
miatter ; error." According to this defini- 



tion Mrs. Eddy has quite a large amount 
of error in the shape of treasures laid 
up in matter. Her weekly bank deposits, 
I learn, are enormous. 

(To De conririueci.} 



%mhx^' Ie0tiniome0, 



THE SNARE IS BROKEN. 

We know what it is to be bound, and 
we know what it is to be free. 

The heaviest yoke I ever was under 
v/as the yoke of Masonry. After I had 
been under Masonic bondage for more 
than thirteen years, a converted Jew 
called my attention to the fact that a 
prayer oft'ered in Christ's name was un- 
Masonic. I soon found out that he was 
correct, so I soon renounced and de- 
nounced Free Masonry as being an anti- 
Christ religion. 

I soon found that they had practiced 
a fraud upon me in charging me $25 
for what they called secrets, when I 
could go to a book store and buy the very 
same in print for 25 cents. How could 
a man be a Christian and be under an 
obligation that he would have to tell lies 
to cover up what had bee-n uncovered 
years ago. Jesus said in Luke 12:2-3: 
"For there is nothing covered that shall 
not be revealed ; neither hid that shall 
not be known. Therefore, whatsoever 
3'e have spoken in darkness shall be 
Ijeard in the light, and that which ye 
have spoken in the ear in closets (even 
at low breath) shall be proclaimed upon 
the housetops." 

"Our soul is escaped as a bird out of 
the snare of the fowlers ; the snare is 
broken, and we are escaped." — Psalms 
124:7. 

After listening to an earnest exhorta- 
tion to the unsaved a short time ago at 
a funeral from a minister wearing his 
square and compass, the Lord gave me 
the above Scriptures and, oh, how I did 
praise the Lord for sweet deliverance ! 
Then my soul became burdened, "To 
proclaim liberty to the captives and the 
opening of the prison to them that are 
bound" (Isaiah 61:1). Of course these 
ministers know that they are bound and 
yoked up with unbelie\ers. We are com- 



September. 1001 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



149 



manded, "Be ye not unequally yoked 
together with unbelievers : for what fel- 
lowship hath righteousness with unright- 
eousness, and what communion hath 
light with darkness, and what concord 
liath Christ with Belial, or what part 
hath he that believeth with an infidel?" 
(IT. Corinthians 6:14-18). Jesus, in his 
Sermon on the ]\Iount (Matthew 5:34- 
37) : ''But I say unto you, swear not 
at all, neither by Heaven, for it is God's 
throne; nor bv the earth, for it is his 
footstool; neither by Jerusalem, for it is 
the city of the Great King ; neither shalt 
thou swear by thy head, because thou 
canst not make one hair white or black. 
But let vour communication be yea, yea; 
nav, nay: for whatsoever is more than 
these Cometh of evil." 

In taking the three first degrees in 
^Masonry you have to swear twenty-five 
times. This may seem strange, but every 
sentence begins with. "I furthermore 
promise and swear." ]\Iasons don't stop 
at swearing by the head, but propose to 
mutilate the whole body. Should you 
find a man with his skull smitten off, his 
brains exposed to the scorching rays of 
the meridian sun, you would think that 
there must be wild Indians in the coun- 
try. Xow, many of our bishops and on 
down to the la}- members have agreed 
to have that done should they reveal 
their so-called secrets of a Royal' Arch 
^lason. 

Nathaniel Colver said a man was not 
bound to keep a sinful oath, but to reoent 
of it. The Lord gave us the remedw 
See Leviticus 5 :4-5 : "Or if a soul swear, 
pronouncing with his lips to do evil or 
to do good, whatsoever it be that a man 
shall pronounce with an oath and be hid 
from him, when he knoweth of it, then 
he shall be guilty in one of these. And 
it shall be when he shall be guilty in 
one of these that he shall confess that 
he hath sinned in that thing." 

Before taking the oath in each degree 
in ^Masonry, each candidate is assured 
that it shall not conflict with his duty 
to his God, his fellowman or his coun- 
try. When I began shifting this yoke 
of bondage off, I soon learned that they 
did not care how much it conflicted with 
a man's religious belief, but expected him 
to keep his oath. 



After I renounced Free Masonry and 
quit attending the lodge, they suspended 
me for non-attendance and non-payment 
of dues ; then they watched me closely 
for eight years to get a plea against me 
to expel me, and during this time there 
were several copies of William Morgan's 
and Edmond Ronayne's expositions of 
Free Masonry bought and read bv mv 
neighbors, and they, knowing that I had 
quit the lodge, came to me to know if 
this was really ^lasonry exposed. I^ 
knowing that these books make the secret 
workings of the lodge as plain as our 
alphabet makes our language, my only 
chance to keep right with (jod was to 
tell the truth. Some men in the lodee, 
whom I had looked upon as being good 
Christians, denied that these books ex- 
posed the secrets of ]\Iasonry. They 
charged me with violating- my obliga- 
tion by divulging the secrets of the or- 
der. I attended the trial. ^ly own evi- 
dence was sufficient for them to expel 
me. I asserted that I would face any 
lodge in the State and assert that these 
books did expose ^Masonry as it was 
taught me in the lodge ; they only proved 
that I had only exposed it by acknowl- 
edging that these books exposed it. 

In conclusion let me admonish every 
honest Christian who is bound under this 
yoke of bondage to come out from among 
them and, "Be ye separate, saith the 
Lord, and I will receive you." 

(Rev.) S. F. Proctor. 

Pilot Point, Texas. 



To lay the treasures of one's educa- 
tion at the feet of humanity, is like the 
offering of the 'Magi when they came to 
Bethlehem and brought their gifts to the 
slirine of humanity's Lord. 



A\'hile we are eating bread to the full 
on the mountain top let us not forget tlie 
manna in the desert places. 



The star-led heart that knows the chart, 

Will reach the land afar : 
And soon or late the harlxir gate, 

Will swino- for him ajar. 



Better be poor and honest than rich 
with a cloud on vour name. 



150 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Septem-ber, 1907. 



WORSHIP AT FRATERNAL HOMES. 

Large Congregations at Odd Fellows' and 

Masonic Institutions. 

Olivet Lodge, Xo. 607, had charge of 
the services at the Masonic Home yes- 
terdav afternoon, when a large congrega- 
tion was present. The sermon was 
preached bv the Rev. Linn Bowman, pas- 
tor of Park Avenue Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

At the Odd Fellows' Home the serv- 
ices were under the auspices of Philadel- 
phia Lodge, No. 18. The chapel was 
too small to accommodate the large con- 
gregation, which partly filled the dining 
room and Hbrary. The sermon was 
preached by the Rev. Dr. Edward Heyl 
Delk, pastor of St. Matthew's Lutheran 
Church.— Philadelphia Ledger, June 10, 
1907. 

JUDGE LORINQ'S INJUNCTION. 

[From the Boston Record.] 
The injunction against the teaming 
strikers granted by Justice Loring, in the 
Supreme Court, is of value in two direc- 
tions. It should end disorder permanent- 
ly, and it will strengthen the contest for 
an open shop made by the master team- 
sters. The injunction, as issued, restrain^ 
the officers and members of Teamsters' 
Union 25 from inciting to assault on the 
strike breakers, cutting harness or ropes 
on the teams of the master teamsters 
and taunting persons on the streets, from 
using its owai funds, or any others, to 
[-■ay "the fares of nonunion men out of the 
city, or to spend money for any further 
promotion of the strike. It is the estab- 
lishment of the principle that is import- 
ant, and the issuance applies to all inter- 
ests and purposes to the 10,000 involved. 



FIRST BLACK=LIST SUIT. 

A resident of Newton, Mass., was em- 
ployed in that city until he went out on 
strike, after which he alleged inability 
to obtain employment at his trade be- 
cause he w^as blacklisted by the Boston 
Alillmen's Club, which appears to have 
entertained ideas of its own as to what 
cer^stituted a scab. He struck May i 
and his strike so rebounded that up to 
the middle of July the effect lasted, keep- 
ing him still away from such work as 
he^at first chose to leave. 



He asked a court injunction to restrain 
members of the Boston Millmen's Club 
from using illegal means to prevent him 
from obtaining work, from using the 
blacklist, and from threatening injury to 
members of their club if they employed 
certain men. 

It w^ould thus appear that the labor 
doctor does not like his own medicine. 
V^irtually to blacklist scabs, prevent their 
obtaining work, and not only threaten 
but also inflict outrageous injury where 
they are employed, is the pattern set by 
the striking unions, but working by that 
pattern on the employers' side does not 
appear a virtue to secret society strikers. 
Hence this first blacklist suit in the State 
of Massachusetts. 



Mtm of ®ur Pari 



OUR NEEDS. 

We ought to have a thousand dollars 
for the distribution of the Cynosure 
among those unacquainted with it or 
with our work. The postal laws permit 
us to send out a thousand dollars' worth 
of sample copies each year for such pur- 
poses. 

The tract work is growing in import- 
ance, but a tithe of its value is not real- 
ized by the friends of this movement. 
Socialists are said to spend an hour each 
day distributing their literature, before 
going to work ; and this is done, not by a 
few, but by a very large number. In 
this way the Socialist movement is be- 
coming known in every large and small 
city. We ask for a thousand dollars for 
the free tract work, though that does not 
begin to be the amount that could be 
profitably used. 

There are now in the field. Rev. F. J. 
Davidson, Rev. G. A. Pegram, Rev. W. 
B. Stoddard, and Mr. LI. R. Smith, Jr. 
At least two thousand dollars ought to 
be contributed for the field work. 

For office and convention expenses at 
least another thousand ought to be 
raised. 

Following this item you will notice the 
gifts which have been received so far 
since our financial year began. We are 



September, IfHJ' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



151 



very grateful to those who have contrib- 
uted, and urge every one to give, if pos- 
sible, more liberally this year than ever 
before. Read President Blanchard's ap- 
peal on page 107 of the last Cynosure, 
"We Prav Less and Pav Less Than We 
Ought." ' 



CONTRIBUTIONS 
From May to September, 1907. 

T. P. K., $5; J. B. B., $3; L C, $2; 
Mrs. C E. M., $4; A. S., 50 cents; E. 
B., $5 ; J. B. W., $1 ; South Olive Ref. 
Ch., $5; R. M. S., $4; Mrs. H. W., $1 ; 
Mrs. N. S. C, $4.37: Rev. J. H., $2; 
Mrs. M. E. McK., $5 ; J. B., $5 : Rev. 
L. G. A., $1; F. D. E., $2.50; Mrs. C. 
H., $5; Mrs. D. C. G., $5; T- P., $2; 
Wheaton Coll. Ch., $18.16; J. P. S., $5; 
H. A. D., $5 ; F. A. N., $7.75 ; Rev. J. 
W. B., $1 ; ^Irs. E. W., $5 ; Rev. G. A. 
P., $5; Miss E. D., $1 ; W. L P.. $5.50; 
Mrs. A. R., $2; Rev. J. W. B., $5; A. 
W. P., $1 ; Mrs. M. W. T., $5 ; Prof T. 
H. P., $2 ; Miss G. N., $2 ; C. L. G., $1 ; 
W G. H., $1 ; Rev. F. T. S., $1 ; :Mrs. J. 
S., $5 ; Mr. and Mrs. J. H. D., $1 ; R. A. 
C, $10; T. K. B., $1; Leighton, la.. 
Christian Ref . Ch., $21.58; Rev. W. H., 
$1 ; F. A. W., $5 ; Mrs. L. G. B. H., $5 ; 
Rev. J. N., $1 ; Mrs. M. M. McC, $1 ; 
Mrs. M. M. B., $1. 



It will well repay one to read Rev. 
C. B. Ward's letter herein and President 
Blanchard's comment. The following is 
in part the platform on which this vet- 
eran missionary began to labor in India 
5:ome twenty-five years ago. It is still 
his platform and one that has been justi- 
fied by results ; 

''AVe must find a hne that will pre- 
clude any native from gathering that 
conversion from heathenism to God con- 
sists in changing names, clothes, eating 
with knives and forks, sitting on chairs 
or getting lots of money. 

' 'Inasmuch as the heathen must be 
convicted of sin by the Holy Ghost and 
led by Him to Christ, and not by means 
of education, teaching, etc., we must 
preach Christ as the apostles did, and 
t^'at only, looking for definite and direct 
results, from 'raw heathenism.' 

''That we must go where the masses 



are if we ever expect them to be con- 
Aerted, i. e., we must open and maintain 
'n the open bazaar and most public per- 
riiissable localities the preaching of 
Christ's (Jospcl in the open air. 

''That our line of work shall be, to 
'testif\- the (jospel,' not to reason about 
it nor allow for one moment any mere 
ground for argument, we being sent not 
to plead for, but declare Christ as the 
world's Redeemer.'' 



Mr. A. J. Millard, of Little Rock, 
Ark., writes of an interesting meeting 
with the little Baptist church of which 
he is a member and of the testimony 
Avliich he was able to give. We thank 
God for such Christian men. How much 
it v^'ould mean if every church had even 
one. 



A\'illiam H. Henderson, evangelist, 
writes from Bakersfield, California, for 
himself and wife: "We want to tell you 
that we heartily endorse the work of the 
Cynosure, and we are doing all we can to 
expose the errors of Secret Societies in 
our city, where they seem to have their 
deadly stamp upon very many people. 
As long as we are here, we shall lift up 
our voice like a trumpet and show the 
people of God the sin and wickedness of 
the Lodge. God bless you and help you 
in all vour work of faith and labor of 
love for Him and precious souls." 



The advertisement, on another page, 
of "The Booze Route'' book, receives 
this unsolicited notice, because, so far as 
we have examined it, we are pleased 
with it and are thankful for its publica- 
tion. I\Ir. Main, the author of the .book, 
seems to be a Spirit-taught man. We 
wish the book had a title which would 
more clearly describe its contents. The 
teaching of the book is good and is verv 
much needed to-day. Wc advise our 
readers to purchase this book. 



C. G. L. writes from Spokane County, 
\\'ashington : "The new pastor of the 
M. E. Church and the presiding elder 
are Masons. They are trying to har- 
monize Christ's rehgion with Masonry. 
]\Iv circulation of the National Christian 



152 



CeRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



iSeptember, 1907, 



Association's tracts, and of the Cyno- 
sure, has crippled their work, and I am 
sultering' in consequence attacks on my 
character and business." 



CAMF=MEETINGS. 

Testimony and warning- against the 
lodges as Satan's churches has charac- 
terized camp-meetings in many places 
this summer, and it seems to us more 
than has been usual in the past. Rev. E. 
R. Dodd writes from Pennsylvania: ''At 
our camp meeting the landslide came. 
Reverend Fero was very pronounced 
against the Lodge, as he was against all 
sin. and we had a great meeting." 

Rev. H. A. Day gave an address be- 
fore the young people at the Wesleyan 
camp-meeting in Michigan, and consid- 
erable anti-secrecy literature was distrib- 
uted there. Agent H. R. Smith, Jr., 
found an open door at Boylston, in New 
York State, and later at Greersville, 
Ohio. 



W. B. STODDARD'S LETTER. 
New York and Ohio Work. 

On West Shore R. R., en route for 
East Xorthfield, Mas... 

August 17, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure — Our train has just 
passed the Morgan monument. There it 
stands in the old Batavia, New York 
cemetery, just as we left it twenty-five 
years ago. This monument, erected to 
one whose voice was hushed in death 
bv a diabolical organization which has 
never given evidence, of repentance for 
its red-handed murder, still speaks to 
the passerby of this awful institutional 
crime. 

Probably very few if any are now alive 
-\vho remember the excitement caused by 
the ]\Iasonic murder of Capt. Wm. Mor- 
gan in 1826, and but few to-day know 
that out of the fifty thousand Masons 
then in this country forty-five thousand 
left the lodge. Then the old Keystone 
State elected her anti-Masonic gover- 
nor, Joseph Ritner, and Rhode Island 
passed her extra judicial oath laws. Oh, 
that we had more such governors, and 
the enforcement of such righteous laws ! 

When I wrote you the 17th of last 
month I was in Delaware County, New 



York — a grand county to be in during 
the summer time — a fine class of fanners 
reside there. They are too busy milking 
the cows to give much time to lodge 
dances. A fine crop of hay was being 
gathered as your agent was securing the 
dollars for the Cynosure cause. Of the 
eighty-five new subscriptions which I 
took on this New York trip, about sev- 
enty go to Delaware County. Meetings 
were held as follows : One each in the 
Methodist Episcopal, Reformed Presby- 
terian and United Presbyterian churches, 
of Bovina Center ; one each in the Re- 
formed Presbyterian church, and the 
Mission in Walton, and two in the De 
Lancey United Presbyterian church. 
Some were more largely attended than 
others, but we believe all contributed to 
the honor of Christ, and the enlighten- 
ment of men. For personal favors the 
writer is indebted to several, but to none 
so much as my good friend and former 
schoolmate. Rev. A. M. Milligan, of De 
Lance}'. Both he and his excellent wife 
made my stay of a few days at their 
home very pleasant. Many expressions 
indicated that he lives on the "sunny 
side." Before I spoke in opposition to 
the lodge he announced : "We will now 
lift the collection, for fear you will not 
give so much when the doctor is 
through." The smile and collection in- 
dicated that the people were not strangers 
to their pastor or his expressions. 

The Bovina Center pastor of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church told of his de- 
liverance from the lodges. His support 
was much appreciated, as was also the 
support of the Covenanter and United 
, Presbyterian pastors, who helped much 
and invited me to return. The Covenan- 
ter, United Presbyterian, Free Metho- 
dist and Baptist pastors of Walton were 
among those who contributed to my sup- 
port. May the Lord bless them all and 
make their lights very bright, for there 
are darkened hearts and minds in Walton 
as elsewhere. The Free Methodist cam.p 
meeting at Norwich, New York, was a 
season of refreshing. Our good friend 
and brother, Crockett, whom I had not 
met for many years, is the elder of this 
district. My messages were well receiv- 
ed and my presentation of the character 



September, llMi: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



153 



of the lodge was sanctioned by the elder 
and others. 

For ten days my \\ork has been cen- 
tered in north central Ohio. At Cleve- 
land and Canton I have addressed synods 
of the Missouri and Ohio Lutheran 
churches, and at Kent a conference of 
the Free Methodist church. On Sab- 
bath last 1 found a few "Pilgrims" out 
at Rocky River, to whom I preached the 
wor^: and gave information regarding tlie 
lodge evil. wSome gave me the compli- 
ment of asking if I would not become 
their pastor. The land around Rocky 
River is said to be worth $i,ooo per 
acre. The pastor, however, need not ex- 
pect to feed in pastures of greenback.^ 
until he should get some of the moss- 
back sinners converted. Friends treated 
me better than I deserved, and the mem- 
ory of the Rocky River meetings is 
pleasant. 

My lecture last Monday evening was 
in the East Side Christian Reformed 
church, Cleveland, Ohio. The coming of 
Domine Brink to shepherd this flock has 
be'en to them a GodsenrL They are build- 
ing upon Christian, anti-Masonic prin- 
ciples. On Tuesday evening a goodly 
number gathered to hear my message in 
Concordia Lutheran church, Akron. Pas- 
tor Yount is at work to get peopk^ to 
Christ cvnd out of the lodges. A 'loving- 
wife and a dear Httle babe contribute to 
his Jiappiness and cheer him in the con- 
flict. There were other calls for lectures 
in Akron, which I was compelled to pass 
for the present. 

Over one hundred Cynosure subscrip- 
tions were secured, largely at the Synod 
and Conference addressed. Of these the 
Missouri Synod of the Central District 
gave more than half. Thanks, friends. 
It is my hope that you may feel you re- 
ceive your money's worth, and that you 
will continue in your support of the Na- 
tional Christian Association, which God 
hat evidently raised up to help stem the 
tide of lodge idolatry that is sweeping 
over the, land, engulfing not alone ni- 
dividual souls, but cliurches, armies of 
men, women and children. 

Surely in view of what God has done 
for us we should be thankful and move 



on to greater victories. 



W. P>. Stoddard. 



FRANCIS JAMES DAVIDSON'S REPORT. 

Jackson, Tenn., August 17, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure — I find this a beauti- 
ful city of about 20,000 inhabitants, a 
large portion of whom are negroes, some 
of them owning very valuable property 
and in prosperous circumstances. The 
races here seem to live friendly and pros- 
per together. 

My train being late brought me here 
at 8:15 p. m. I had expected to preach 
for Rev. PI. B. Brown's church, as per 
])rearrangement, but on m\' arrival I 
found his church five or six miles out 
in the country. Xo person here to meet 
me. So being a stranger, 1 made the 
best of it I could. I inquired for the 
city pastors, but was unable to meet a 
single one of them. I secured a few sul>- 
scribers, distributed a few tracts and 
held a few personal conferences on the 
evils of secretism. 

At Fulton, Ky. 

I met another disappointment here, 
but received a cordial welcome to return 
with promise of opportunity to lay our 
work before the church and people. • 
At Holly Springs, Miss. 

I met a hearty welconie from the 
brethren of the Holly Springs District 
Baptist Association, v^hich was holding 
the Annual Meeting at the Baptist Nor- 
mal and Theological Institute of Xorth 
Mississippi. This is a new school, hav- 
ing been organized after Gov. J. K. 
A^ardaman disrupted the State Normal 
School here for negroes. This build- 
mg is 2C0 feet by 65 feet, two and a 
half stories, brick. It is not finished, but 
the brethren are struggling heroically 
to have it complete by October ist, the 
beginning of their session. I preached 
and lectured to the Holly Springs Asso- 
ciation and received $2.60 contribution 
and a number of subscriptions and dis- 
tributed tracts. T met Rev. R. A. Jack- 
son, missionary from Africa, who has 
labored there in the employ of the For- 
eign Mission Board of the National Bap- 
tist convention since ]8g(). Rev. Jack- 
son's description of English and lielgian 
cruelties to the African natives is thrill- 
ing and heart-rending. 

At Oxford, Miss. 

I delivered an address here under the 
auspices of the Women's Home Mission 



ira 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1907. 



Society. I received a donation of $2 and 
a few new subscriptions, distributed 
tracts and departed. 

At Taylor, Miss. 
I lectured at Xorth Hope Baptist Church 
and received $1.15 and a number of sub- 
scriptions and distributed tracts. Sev- 
eral ardent secretists became very in- 
dignant during- my lecture and left the 
building, but the masses sat quiet and 
endorsed all I said and bade me God- 
speed. 

At Hallidayboro, III. 
I received a hearty welcome and intro- 
duction to the East Mount Olive Baptist 
Association. I preached one sermon, 
distributed tracts, secured a number of 
Cynosure readers and succeeded in get- 
ting a strong anti- secret resolution 
through the association, which reads as 
follows : 

"Resolved, That we believe the rapid 
multiplication of oath-bound secret so- 
cieties a spiritual hindrance to the cause 
of Christ, an extravagant nuisance and a 
hindrance to republican government ; 
therefore we advise our people to sep- 
arate themselves from secret societies and 
pray, work and fight against them." 

Secret societies are unusually strong 
here. 

At Cairo, 111. 
I am very glad to be at home again 
with Mrs. Davidson until the great meet- 
ing of the National Baptist convention 
next month in Washington, D. C. I am 
very glad to say a change from Green- 
ville, Miss., seems to be a great benefit 
physicallv to Mrs. Davidson. 

The Cynosure is doing a silent but 
effective work here. A very intelligent 
lady said to me a few days ago, 'T did 
not know there was such an organization 
as the National Christian Association. 
They have certainly opened my eyes. I 
am done with all secret societies. I am 
convinced thev are frauds." This is the 
conviction of thousands who have been 
deceived into the lodge, but who are not 
courageous enough to step down and 
out. Pray for the glorious triumph of 
truth here in this rum-ridden, lodge- 
stricken city. Yours sincerely, 

F. J. Davidson. 



FROM THE MICHIGAN AGENT. 

Grand Ledge, IMich., August 19, IQ07. 

Dear Cynosure — I continued at Elk- 
ton a few days after my last letter. On 
July 2 1st I preached to an interested 
audience at Wakefield. Here I distribur- 
ed a number of tracts. On July 23d I 
went to Sebewaing to look after N. C. 
A. interests. On that day the Luth- 
erans began a kind of Sabbath School 
convention of Sag'inaw A'alley. They 
kindly gave u-ie a few minutes to pre- 
sent our reform work. They ?,re in 
sympathv with the cause of Anti-secrecy 
and are loyal to its principles. 

I next went to Flint. Here I met a 
number of our Cynosure patrons and 
distributed tracts. On July 24th I went 
to the Free Methodist camp meeting at 
Ortonville. They kindly invited me to 
preach. Free Methodists always seem 
to appreciate straight sermons. For this 
reason I enjoy preaching to them. 

The next dav found me at Shepards- 
ville, at the State camp meeting of the 
Apostolic Holiness Union. Here I both 
heard and delivered straight gospel ser- 
mons. I had the privilege of preaching 
four times. From the number and man- 
ner of comments I heard, the truth went 
home. I sowed the wdiole camp with 
several hundred tracts, which almost im- 
mediately bore fruit ; for thereafter near- 
ly every sermon and many testimonies 
gave good evidence of the seed sown. 
The Holiness people are true to anti- 
secrecy principles. Both the Cynosure 
and lodge rituals found patrons here. 

I found an excellent field of labor at 
the Wesleyan Methodist camp meeting 
at Hastings. I met several old friends 
and made more new^ ones." Flere I had 
the privilege of presenting the claims 
of Jesus Christ in a gospel sermon and 
also presented the claims of our cause. 
The Wesley ans are in deep sympathy 
W'ith Anti-secrecy. I found here quite 
a number of readers of the Cynosure, 
and secured the subscriptions of many 
more. Bro. H. A. Day delivered an ex- 
cellent address on Lodgism and also 
recommended the National Christian As- 
sociation W'Ork, literature and agent. 

On August 1 8th 1 had the pleasant 
privilege of preaching twice to the Free 



September, irKj^ 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Methodists of Grand Ledge ; once on 
Lodgism. I distributed tracts here at 
both church and depot, and also while 
waiting for train at Woodbur}-. The 
cause of Anti-secrec)- seems to be gain- 
ing ground in Michigan, and seems more 
hopeful than ever. Yours for righteous- 
ness. G. A. Pegram. 



"Pointed Bible Readings'' is a booklet 
of 1 60 pages, 6x4 inches, by E. E. Shel- 
hamer, publisher, Atlanta, Ga. It is 
divided into four parts: ''On Awakening 
of the Impenitent," "Heart Searching for 
Professed Christians," "On Holiness," 
and "Miscellaneous." 

Under part fourth Sabbath Desecra- 
tion, Secret Societies, What the Mor- 
mons Teach and many other subjects are 
helpfully handled. Write to the pub- 
lisher for it. Price 50 cents. 



OHIO STATE AGENT. 

Leonardsburg, Ohio, Aug. 16, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure — The past month has 
been full of experiences tending to stamp 
my mind with an indelible mark of anti- 
secret conviction. I realize, more than 
ever before, the magnitude of the lodg^e 
evil, and the need of united and tireless 
opposition to it. 

An aged business man in Syracuse, N. 
Y., advanced the idea that we should sim- 
ply preach Christ and speak of evil only 
in a general way, never specifying par- 
ticular forms of sin. 

Weeds do not usually die out of them- 
selves. Men must l^e. convicted before 
they can get converted. 

As Brother W. B. Stoddard and I were 
approaching Norwich, N. Y., on the 
train, a drunken man sat down in the 
seat ahead of us. After a time he turned 
and asked me if I were a ATason. I 
noticed his Masonic pin and replied that 
I knew something of Masonry and had 
heard of the three ruffians, Jubela, Jubelq 
and Jubelum. He then began to ply his 
test questions. I knew w^hat the ques- 
tions were, but in my short experience 
I had not fully prepared myself for such 
emergencies, so I referred him to Brother 
Stoddard, who readily gave hini the 
proper answers to his questions. Brother 
Stoddard asked the man if thev ever hurt 



any one in his lodge when they tossed 
them up in the blanket. He replied, "No, 
but we had an awful fight once." When 
we were ready to leave the train our 
drunken Masonic friend gave us the 
strong grip of a Master Mason, and I 
Iianded him some anti-secret tracts. 

A Baptist minister said in ni}' hearing 
that he went into several lodges, hoping 
to gain influence for Christ. He utterly 
failed to realize his hopes, and being con- 
vinced that tliese lodges were a great 
harm to tlic church, he left them all. 

In Syracuse, N. Y., I found good 
friends among the Reformed Presbv- 
terians. Among the Free ^Methodists I 
met an enthusiast in the person of Rev. 
Almiron Smith, who, though totally 
blind, has served as an evangelist, has 
written books and published many anti- 
secret tracts. Friends at the Wesleyan 
Methodist Publishing House gave me a 
royal welcome and helped me in every 
way possible. The hospitality of Rev. 
J. B. Knappenberger, of the Wesleyan 
church, was greatly enjoyed. I attended 
Sabbath service and distributed litera- 
ture at the Eastwood Wesleyan church, 
where Rev. J. S. Willett is pastor. No- 
where did I receive more encouragement 
for the work than at the home of Rev. 
Mrs. Annis A. Rathbun, widow of a not- 
ed seceding Mason, anti-secret lecturer 
and preacher, who figured prominently in 
the field a number of years ago, and who 
suffered mob violence for his aggressive 
opposition to lodges and probably died 
prematurely because of injuries thus re- 
ceived. 

At the Free Alethodist camp meeting 
at Fulton, N. Y., I was given an oppor- 
tunity to address the people. I gave out 
considerable literature, and did personal 
work, but failed to interest many in the 
Cynosure. I felt honored in being per- 
mitted to tent with Rev. Mr. Sims, of 
Toronto, Canada. My thanks go out to 
that splendid man of God, Rev. D. C. 
Stanton, of Utica, N. Y., for his sym- 
pathy and kind words of encouragement* 

At Boylston, N. Y., I spent a whole 
week in a camp meeting, where a most 
nourishing spiritual feast was spread. 
Here, too, I was fortunate in getting 
good men to tent with — Rev. A. T. Jen- 



Ion 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



'Septem'ber, 1907. 



n.ings. editor of the W'esleyan ^lethodist, 
and Rev. E. \\'. Bruce, professor in 
theology at Houghton Sennnary. For the 
kind hospitahty of Brother and Sister 
Haven and others I am greatly indebted. 
I spoke to an attentive audience, distri- 
buted literature and took eleven subscrip- 
tions for the Cynosure. 

On my return to Oliio, August 13, I 
found some kind letters awaiting me 
from friends, who are ready to shoulder 
their share of the burden of the coming- 
fight against the Christless empire of 
darkness in our own State. 

H. R. Smith, Tr. 



BUNYAN'S PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. 

The Pilgrim's Progress from this 
world to that which is to come. By John 
Bunyan. In paper cover 10 cents, in 
cloth 25 cents. Address E. E. Shelha- 
mer. publisher, Atlanta, Ga. 



MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

Pine Bluff, Ark., Aug. 14, 1907. 
Editor Christian Cynosure : 

I am still battling for the Lord against 
the Lodge religion. 

I met with a church in the country not 
far from Wabbaseka ; I had sent my ap- 
pointment a month ahead and went ac- 
cordingly for the Sunday service. One 
brother came to me and said, ''Sister 
Woods, I am glad you are here, but you 
will find some opposition." I said, "Oh, 
yes, I am looking for that." Then the 
pastor said, "I hope you will put the 
mission work forciblv before us here. 
They are not doing anything for mis- 
sions. These fraternity people — I would 
advise you not to say much on that." I 
replied, Lwould say what the Holy Spir- 
it gave me to speak ; what that would be 
God knew, I did not. In a few moments 
one of the deacons came up to me and 
asked me to go with him outside, to the 
back of the church, and then said, "They 
tell me you are preaching against Secret 
Lodges." *T beg your pardon, I am not 
a preacher, I am a teacher," I said. 
*Well," he said, ''what do you teach?" 
I answered, "The Bible." "Well, what 
do you teach against?" I said, "Sin." 
He asked, 'Ts the Lodge a sin?" I an- 
swered, 'Ts it a sin to swear to have 
your throat cut from ear to ear?" 



About this time two mo^-e men walked 
up ; they got so mad you could see it in 
their eyes ; thev said, "We know the 
Lodges are not altogether right, but we 
cannot let you tell our secrets here to- 
day. A^ou cannot speak here to-day." 
"All right," I said, 'T will dust my feet." 
I went back into the church and got 
my grip and started away, but the pas- 
tor called me back and said, "Sister 
Woods, do not leave here. A'ou must talk 
here to-day. I cannot let you leave here 
for telling the truth." The pastor said 
to the committee: "If Sister Woods can- 
not talk here to-day I will leave here 
myself." They said, "Well, if you are 
bound to let her lecture, we will have to 
take it." 

When I began to speak I told them to 
"gird up now thy loins like a man ; for I . 
will demand of thee, and answer thou 
me." (Job. 38: 3.) "For God is going 
to talk to you through His servant." 

I took the verse, Matthew 5 : 33, and 
discussed their oaths up to the Mark 
Master's Degree. 

When I got through talking their an- 
swer was like Job's, "W^hat shall I an- 
swer thee? I will lay mine hand upon 
my mouth." 

I am going to meet another Associa- 
tion next month if nothing evil happens 
to me. The preachers in the District are 
coming out of the orders. W^e are go- 
mg to take this country for Christ. 

I lectured last Sunday night at Hum- 
phrey. The Masons filled the house and 
stood all around. They threatened tO' 
have me arrested ; and said if I stayed 
until Monday they would put me in jail. 
Well, I stayed till Tuesday, and they did 
not put me in jail. They told the pas- 
tor not to let me speak, but he did not lis- 
ten to them. He knew that the District 
Association sent me to the churches. He 
was afraid and said just before I got up, 
"W> have a sister missionary with us 
to-night ; she will not, I know, talk about 
the Lodges to-night." I got up and said, 
'T am very sorry for the Masons to-night 
if they think they have put it on the pas- 
tor to tell me wdiat to talk about. I am 
going to talk about sin to-iiight. The 
Holy Spirit does not leave out sin and 
He is mv Teacher;" so I began on the 



September, 10(>( 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



I'm 



Lodge question. \\'hen I sat down part 
of them were for me and the other part 
were against me. Three of the preach- 
ers, lodge men. said. "The Bible is right 
and we are going to quit the Lodge." 
(Mrs.) Lizzie Woods. 



from ©ur JlkiL 



KIND WORDS FRO.M FRIENDS. 

Indianola. ^liss. 
It is with much love and thanks to 
m\- heavenly Father that I write to you. 
I have a copy of the Christian Cynosure 
which I received from a friend who sub- 
scribed from your agent. Rrother F. T. 
Davidson, and it is a Godsend to me as 
a. gospel minister and pastor of two 
small churches, and seeing the evils of 
Secret Societies. I prayed to my Father 
to send me light and to help break the 
power of the Beast. I believe that it 
came in answer to my prayer. Xow I 
want to become a subscriber for your 
magazine ; also I want to co-operate with 
you in the work. Please send me copies 
of your magazine and a package of your 
Christian Workers" Tracts, for which 
find payment enclosed. Yours truly. 



I Rev. I D. T. Washington. 



Spring Arbor. ^lich. 
I am glad to get the Cynosure to read. 
and to learn that it is getting a good 
hold on the schools and some ^lethodist 
preachers. So I bid it Godspeed. Yours 
truly. 

Jasper T. Tucker. 



. Laurel, Xeb. 

\\'e are trying to do what we can in 

this vicinity. God bless you in your 

work, is my prayer, ^^'ife and I like 

the Cynosure very much. Yours truly. 

E. E. Lundquist. 



Rossmoyne. Hamilton Co.. Ohio. 
I am much pleased with the Cyno- 
sure and do not want to be without it. 
I Rev. I Tames Stickel. 



Sheridanville, Pa. 
The Cynosure is a welcome visitor to 
our home, and after it is carefuUv read 



it is sent on to others, that its teachings 
on Secret Soc-ieties may have a wider in- 
liuence. Our prayer is that God may 
bless your efforts in shedding forth light 
on the hidden things of darkness. Re- 
spectfully yours. 

Tames Shaw. 



Downieville. Sierra Co.. Cal. 
I like the Cynosure and only wish vou 
might succeed : but I fear the lodge 
craze is too strong to be overcome. I 
have no use for lodges. I have seen 
homes broken up on account of them. 
The ^Masonic lodge has imbittered my 
whole married life, as it has been always 
first to my husband and I second, while 
I wanted to be first. In this town the 
lodges have a large membership, and 
they all turn out to the lodge meetings : 
nothing keeps them home from their 
lodges, while I have been to church 
when we have had only one man with us. 
and there are very seldom more than 
five men at church. Yet they all go to 
lodge meetings. They just had a big 
meeting which lasted two days, and one 
night they had a big banquet and invited 
their wives to the banquet. The Worth}- 
Grand blaster of the State of California 
was there. Edward H. Hart, of Berke- 
ley. AMth him was \\'illiam H. Ed- 
wards. Grand Lecturer. Lodge mem- 
bers came from all the towns around us. 
and our little town was alive with ^la- 
sons. This Worthy Grand blaster made 
a speech, and of course, praised the la- 
dies very highly and fiattered them so 
they seemed to think him very nice. 
Then he said that all the good men in 
every town were Masons — the judges, 
lawyers, doctors, teachers, all the good 
men. belonged to the Masonic lodge. He 
wanted all yoiuig men to join and be 
with them. He said the Masonic frater- 
nity ranked before the churches : that 
there were no Christian denominations 
which showed such brotherly love as the 
Masons, and did so many noble things : 
everything they taught in their lodge 
was ennobling. 

^Irs. . 



A tear has fiuated many a wayward 
soul into the haven of eternal peace. 



158 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1907. 



SNAKES HOLD REVELRY. 

The following report contained in the 
Daily Crescent-News, published in De- 
fiance. O., August 7, 1907, needs no com- 
ment, it speaks for itself. If any reader 
of the Cynosure knows of a secret order 
whose ceremonies come nearer to Satan 
■icorship than the ceremonies of the "Mili- 
tary Order of the Serpent," we would 
like to hear from him. Compare with the 
report the following passages from the 
Bible: 

Gen. 3:1: "Now the serpent was more 
subtle than any beast of the field which 
the Lord God had made." 

II. Cor. II :3 : "But I fear, lest by any 
means, as the serpent beguiled Eve 
through his subtilty, so your minds 
should be corrupted from the simplicity 
that is in Christ." 

John 8 :44 : "Ye are of your father the 
devil, and the lusts of your father ye 
will do. He was a murderer from the 
beginning and abode not in the truth, be- 
cause there is no truth in him." 

Revel. 20:2, 3: "And he laid hold on 
the dragon, that old serpent, zvliieh is the 
devil, and Satan, and bound him a thous- 
and years and cast him into the bottom- 
less pit." K. 



Ofiice of the Gospel Messenger, Will- 
iamston, Martin Co., N. C, Aug. 15, 
1907. 

Dear Sir: Your favor of Aug. 13th, 
with the two sets of tracts, is just at 
hand. Accept my thanks. It is a great 
pleasure to me to advertise and circulate 
your valuable literature against the 
works of darkness. Yours very truly, 
Sylvester Hassell, Editor. 



Little Rock, Ark., August 15, 1907. 
Editor Cynosure, Chicago : 

In looking over a back volume of tlie 
Cynosure I found an article alx)Ut "Tak- 
ii;g Up the Collection," which took :ny 
thoughts back to two months ago, at 
the time of the last session of the An- 
nual Meeting. 

Dr. Blanchard says that we pray Irss 
ciud pay less than we ought, and I am 
quite sure he is right. I believe tliat 
this subject rests upon the amount of 
iuitli that we have on hand. Let -all take 



an inventory of our faith — of what we 
believe we can accomplish and that Vv^ill 
enable us to give, or rather pay, accord- 
ingly. 

I suppose that some of the delegates 
and visitors at this annual meeting were 
agreeably surprised at the way that the 
General Secretary and President took up 
tliat collection at the Annual Meeting. 
Should we not call it our annual offer- 
ing ? It certainly is the Lord's work and 
if i^. is he will tell us how much we ov/e 
hnn. A. T. Millard. 



Oakwood, Wis. \ 
Enclosed find one dollar for renewal 
of my subscription for the Christian 
Cynosure for one year more. I am cer- 
tain that this dollar is well spent. My 
only wish is that every person would- 
read the Cynosure; it would be a bless- 
ing to everv one of them. Yours trulv, 
Rev. Dr. J. B. Bernthal. ' 



Boone, Iowa. 
Enclosed find renewal of my subscrip- 
tion for your valued publication. I feel 
it to be my duty to support the noble 
work you are carrying on. Respectfully 
yours. 

Rev. Otto Erbe. 



"The Booze Route'' 

A NEW, RADICAL 200-PAGE BOOK 

Takes up many evils of the present age. Tells the 
author's experience, who went the route. The 
first forty-two pages are on lodges and "mixing- 
with the wise guys." This book treats of lodges, 
saloons, cigarettes, churches, crime. Midway races,, 
fly cops, prisons, asylums, politicians, infidelity, 
gambling, hoboes, disappointment in love, traffic 
in girls, the dance, the skating rink, libertines and 
seducers, capital and labor, isms and schisms, and 
sports, all in one volume. It stands for the Bible 
truth on holiness. 

The Booze Route Publishing Company's; 
leaders are: 

"The Booze Route." "Life of Carrie A. Nation," 
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(Expose on Secret Orders), "Hot Shot on Holi- 
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"Bali-Room to Hell." Any one of these books 
mailed postpaid for 30 cents. 

Stock in this company, .*f!1.00 per .share^ 

ADDRESS : 

JOHN E. MAIN, 

Alhambra, 

Los Angeles Co., California^ 



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^^'l^rife (sizf^ (otrfs St:rf^ Strfe (Birr^ Siir^ (ct=^ (sY:f^ S^fzi^ (dYz^"^^ (cYr^'^^r^ rf|) 






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WE BELIEVE THAT 

I Christians ought never to join Secret Societies: 



NAME 


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STATE 




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SOME REASONS: 

BECAUSE Christians are commanded not to have fellowship 
with works of darkness but to reprove them. Eph. ^\ W. 

BECAUSE Jesus said: Every one that doeth evil hateth the 
light. Jno. 13: 20. 

BECAUSE Jesus said: Ye are the light of the world. Matt. 
5: 14. He that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his 
deeds may be made manifest, that they are wrought in 
God. Jno. 3: 21. ' 

BECAUSE Jesus said: '1 spake openly to the world * * * 
and in secret have I said nothing/^ and ''if any man serve 
me let him follow me.^^ 

BECAUSE those who know and love the truth could, by sign- 
ing the above testify for the right and against evil, and we 
ought to be witnesses in the world. 

Ask others to join with you and a great many who never thought 
about it before, if asked to sign would begin to think what 
Jesus would do about these lodges if he v/ere here. 



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100 CHRISTIAN CYNQSURB. Septem'ber, 1907. 

STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
CONCERNING LODGES 

.. FOR SALE BY 

The National Christian Association 
22 J West Madison Street, Chicago, Illinois. 



IMPORTANT INFORMATION - HOW TO ORDER 

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ON FREEMASONRY OTHER LODGE RITUALS 

FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. AND SECRETS 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of «_-__—« 

the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP ILLUS- 

Master of Unity Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. TRATED. 

Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the r^^ comnlete revised ritual of the Lodge, 
institution and a critical analysis of the character Encampment and Rebeklh (ladfes" ) degrees By 
of each degree, by President J Blanchard, of Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, 
Wheaton College Monitorial quotations and many ^^ guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a 
notes from standard Masonic authorities confirm ^ ^^ ^ ^^^ j j^ history and character of 
the truthfulness of this work and show the ^j^^ ^^ ^^% hundred foot-note quotations 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The ^ standard authorities, showing the character 
accuracy of this ntual is legally attested by J. ^ teachings of the ordef. and an analysis of each 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge No 191, ^ ^ ^ President ,J. Blanchard. This ritual 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, corresponds exactly with the "Charge Books" fur- 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue wished by the Sovereign Grand Lodge. Cloth, 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations «i sn- narier co-o-er 75 cents 
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dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 UAJj. 

pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cover, 60 cents. An exact copy of the new official ritual 



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This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
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UAL. 



Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 

degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal , . ^ ^ . , -^ , -e +u lo « 

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pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and illus- ficiary and Fraternal degrees (illustrated), with 

trations. It gives the correct method of con- "unwritten" or secret work, installation, funeral 

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conducting the business of the Lodge. The _„.._„„_. .p„-. -j^j,-^ ■RTTTTAT. 

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obligations, signs, grips and passwords. All of The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 

-?hich are correct and can be relied upon. The ac- Order of Red Men, comprising the Adoption De- 

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work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
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HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne. I*as-t Master of Key- 
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closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
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MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

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ECCE ORIENTL 

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FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
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was a "bright Mason." but left the lodge when 
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OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGFEES 
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To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
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FREEMASONRY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 
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By Rev. James P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
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MASONIC OUTRAGES. 

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REVISED REEEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 
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Revised amended official "Ritual for Rebekab 
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A. O. U. W. RITUAL. 

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ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

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SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

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CONTENTS. 



Hon. Joseph Ritner^ — Portrait and Sketch. 162 
Night or Morning. By Rev. A. Thomson. 162 
Christian Science. By Rev. A. C. Dixon, 

D. D 163 

Sues Black Hand , .^ 170 

Some TjT)ical Highbinders — Portraits. ,. .171 

Hep Sing Tong and Freemasons 171 

The Heathen Chinee 172 

Chinese Triads 172 

How the Lodge Dominates the Local 

Church. By Rev. G. A. Pegram 173 

A Valuable Gift — Masonic History — Ac- 
tion Associate Synod of Scotland, 1745- 

1757 177 

Masonic Cornerstone Laying — Pilgrims' 

Monument 178 

Trade Union Against Civic Union 178 

Ministers' Union Cast Out by Unionists .. 179 

American Society of Equity 179 

Dynamite in His Wheat 180 

"Refonned Hunchakist Society" 180 

News of Our Work 181 

Elder, Git Off'r Dat Goat. By S. S. 

Buttler 185 

From Our Exchanges 187 

Oddfellows Not to Exclude Liquor Men. .187 

Drinking in Lodge 187 

A Personal Experience with Saloon and 

Lodge. By Rev. H. P. Gray 188 

Jesuits Regaining Power in Italy 189 



Mrs. Carry Nation to Masons 189 

How Can Two Walk Together?— Minis- 
ters' and Brewers' Unions 189 

High School Fraternities. (Fix)m Revieiu 
of Revieics) .190 

From Our Mail 191 



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folly, Expense and Danger 

OF 

Secret Societies. 

BY CHARLES A. BLANCH ARD, President 
of Wheaton College. 

They may be rudely classified as religious; 
«. g., the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfellow- 
ship, the Knights of Pythias, etc.: political, as 
the Know-nothings, Knights of the Golden 
Circle, the Order of American Deputies, th^ 
Kuklux-Klan, the V.^hite League, etc.: indus- 
trial: as the unions of carpenters, bricklayers, 
conductors, engineers, etc. : insurance; as the 
Royal Arcanum, the Modern Woodmen, tht 
})rder of the Iron Hall, the Ancient Order of 
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'Jesus answered him,— I spake openly to the world; and in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XL. 



CHICAGO, OCTOBER, 1907. 



NUMBER 6. 



HON. JOSEPH RITNER, OF PENNSYLVANIA. 



The sixteenth day of October is the an- 
niversary of the death of Hon. Joseph 
Ritner; who, after serving twice as 
speaker of the Pennsylvania house of 
representatives, became governor in 1835, 
and held the chair until 1839. He was 
also director of the Mint in Philadelphia 
during part of the year 1849. 

He was born in Pennsylvania March 
25, 1789, of German parents ; and owed 
much of his culture to a good library of 
German books, to which he had access 
while yet a young man working on a 
farm. This library largely supplied the 
place of school, which he attended in 
youth only six months. He, however, be- 
came one of the fathers of the Pennsyl- 
vania school system, which had been es- 
tablished so recently as 1834, during the 
administration of his predecessor, Gov. 
Wolf. Continuing the noble and wise 
policy of his predecessor. Gov. Ritner 
spared no effort to diffuse through the 
entire commonwealth the benefit of the 
school system. It was thus brought into 
v/ide operation ; before his administration 
ended the number of public schools in 
Pennsylvania increased from 762 to 
5,200, the appropriation, also, rising from 
75,000 to 400,000 dollars. 

During his administration, the Consti- 
tution of Pennsylvania was amended : all 
life offices were abolished ; the guberna- 
torial office was almost wholly separated 
from patronage ; the right of suffrage 
was extended, and State and count)' of- 
fices became elective. 

In 1838 a legislature was chosen, with 
the duty devolving upon it of electing a 
United States Senator. Both the Whigs 
and the Democrats claimed control of 



the House, carrying matters so far as to 
elect two speakers, each representing one 
of the contending factions. Violent par- 
tisans of both collected in the lobby, and 
when the legislature adjourned, took pos 
session of the legislative chambers. The 
State militia was then called out by Gov. 
Ritner, who also asked for Federal 
troops, which were refused by President 
Van Buren, who objected that the dis- 
turbance was due to local poHtics. 

The State militia met at Plarrisburg. 
the State capital ; and, without authority, 
the keeper of federal supplies turned over 
to the State a large quantity of balls and 
buckshot cartridges. This led to the re- 
mark that the mob would soon feel the 
effect of ''powder and buckshot;" and 
gave the bloodless affair the title, ''Buck- 
shot War." After several days of fierce 
excitement, the Senate, which had an 
anti-Masonic majority, recognized the 
Democratic speaker of the House, Will- 
iam Hopkins. 

Governor Ritner himself was elected 
as the candidate of the anti-Masonic par- 
ty, which had lately come into political 
prominence, on the mairder of William 
Morgan, and the open exposure and 
abandonment of Freemasonry. January 
24, 1837, the speaker of the house pre- 
sented a memorial from three citizens of 
Union County, complaining that Gover- 
nor Ritner had made unwarrantable use 
of President Washington's words, when 
sending his own annual address to the 
legislature ; and requesting the appoint- 
ment of a committee to wait on the gov- 
ernor, 'and solicit from him the source 
of information, from wliich he derived 
his authority" for his representation con- 



CHKISTIAN CYNOSUKE. 



October. 1907. 



cerning ^^'ashing■ton as an opponent of 
Freemasonry. 

The response, made by Governor Rit- 
ner to this committee, was dated at the 
''Executive Chamber, Harrisburg. ^larch 
8th. 1837." AMiile it may be open to re- 
vision, in some particulars, it still re- 
mains a valuable reference document, full 
of important information. 



Make to-day your best day and to- 
morrow will be better. 



NIGHT OR MORNING. 

BY EEY. A. THOMSOX. 

Martha — 

Good evening. Brother Mann. Look where 

the West 
Is like the sea of the Apocalypse. 
And fleecy cloudlets floating on its tide 
Are like the islands oz the Mirza Dream. 



Why. when some God-sent messenger appear , 
And moves a church or city with the ix)wer 
Of our old gospeh till like fluttering doves 
The souls fly to our Zion. and we say. 
•"Great is the gracious harvest of the Lord" — 
Why six months hence, when we look for the 

fruit. 
Find we but here and there a golden sheaf? 

Why is the ball-room dearer than the church? 
The card-club better than the home of 

prayer ? 
Wliy the great body of otir men content 
With imt a deisfs more than doubtful faith — 
The fatherhood of God and man his brother? 
Do men believe in G<>d? Aye. That is we-11 ; 
So do the demons. But is that our faith? 

1//'. JJaiui. 

Well, sister, you're a pessimist indeed: 

And where the fire burns brightly, there you 

stand 
With your wet blanket to extinguish it. 



Mi'. Mann. 

Oh. Sister Martha. I am glad to know 
You see the glory of the coming time. 
A glory that defies the poet's dreams. 
I only wish that you had power to see 
The glory of the morning breaking now 
In radiant splendor o'er a waking world. 
The glorious, cloudless morning that was seen 
By David in his vision. All the isles 
Are lightened with its splendor, and the night. 
The long, dark night, has passed away for- 
ever. 

Martha— 

Amen, my brother, if the thing be true. 

Said not King Saul. "I have obeyed His 

voice. 
Have gone His way. and Amalek is no more"? 
What was the answer of the prophet then ? 
"What mean the lowing herds and bleating 

flocks ? 
Why then preserved?" The Lord had said 

destroy. 
Is this the cloudless morning of a day 
To be all cloudless? Then what means the 

roar 
Of hungry Mammon and the bitter cry 
Of those who are his victims? Hear you not 
The hiss of that great serpent of the still. 
And the cry of those who march, with angry 

hearts. 
Beneath the fiery banner that ]n-oclaims 
Their hot impatience and their stern re.solve 
To charge your cloudless morning with the 

chill . ^ 

Of desY>lation? 



Martha — ■ 

X'o. brother. I am not. The soul cannot l>e 
Whose faith is fixed in the Almighty God : 
His way must prosper, and His throne shall 

stand. 
Small is my devil, but my God is great : 
And every knee before Him yet shall bow. 
And every tongue acknowledge Him as King : 
But this is not the day. I'm sure there is 
A subtle poison in our social life. 
An unseen ix)wer reaches from the dark 
A big ••Black Hand." that strangles in its 

grip 
The hopes of thousands : in our fields of 

wheat 
Saws the rank tares: and at our altars 

stands 
And offers his strange fire before the Lord. 
This palsies our best efforts and makes bare 
Of all but leaves the fig-tree of our God 
In many places. This the chilling frost 
Tliat nips the tender shoots and spreads its 

lilight . 
T'lM>n what else would be a smiling world. 
Until this deadly power is found and broken, 
I see no cloudless morning's happy token. 
Two Rivers. Wis. 



A blank cartridge may make as mitch 
noise as a loaded one ; btit it brings no 
eame to the marksman. 



Riotous prodigality has but one ter- 



mmal. 



«;»_-iot»er. li—T 



CHRISTIAN- CYNOSURE. 




CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. 
DY REV. A. C. mXOX. D. D. 

The Religion of Christian Science. 
Lhrisdan Science :< a prayerless relig- 
ion. It uses the word prayer, but the 
fact ■: f prayer, in the Christian sense of 
a-kin:^- the ii^"::ig 'jCkI for sornething, is 
absent. Tliis text-b<x»k calls prayer only 
"divine n e::::: ' : ' "'^i:: !:- :::^"": and 
it says t! r i. / :h ^ mental 

reservat: .; kuow iiow it be- 

gins? ■■ vr i :.: V : who art in heaven 
:tnd mother all harmonious. Tiiat i? tiie 
•vay the Lore's rr-yv- "ei:i::s ii: :: :? 
Christian Scie:::c :ex: Mrs. Z h 

defines Lkxi as iv - s :::.: 

lemininitvis sure: : .tiiere- 

•:;r :\\- -: ^ :r:; :::ne. I heard 
: :_ : All say — I could 

- : : . rnt if it had noz 
_.c::ce — that she wa^ 
eeting of Ch-isriar. 
: :y of Bostor 
' " '. r - ' -ayer. be^i: :: ::^. 
r ::1 mother. Mrs. 



fore the -1 
an intr!!:^ 

riar^i/ ' _' 



:^cienusL 
thev use 



•Our Fat- 
Eddy." 

I am glad to believe that tiiere are 
Christian Scientists who still pray; but if 
thev do. it is because of relisjious teachins;^ 



of former years which they have not yet 

unlearned ; for the fact oi praying, in the 

ser.se of asking God for 5c»mething. is ut- 

'enied by" the 0:ristian Science cult. 

^.-ristian Science is a religion without 

a personal God: it asserts that Love is 

^ d : Truth is God: ever\-thing is God. 

-Cause God is said- to be of and in all : 

out it denies that all things put together 

can make a pers^Dnalit^'. 

Christian Science is a religion without 
confession oi sin. and tiierefore without 
lorgiveness. It d'Des the very opposite 
of confessing sin, by contending that sio 
has no existence. L'lok at that in the 
light of common sense \Mien you have 
accepted the doctrine that sin has no real- 
ity, oi course it has no guilt, and tliere 
enmation : and where there 
^ re is perfect Hbeny. The 

SIC principle is that ever\-thing in this 

: :"': i is good, and what seems to be sin 

- :. : sin : there is no element of sin in 

the world : no abs«jlution. no punishment. 

no death, no hell. You see what a libeny- 

it gives to sin. 

But the saddest feature of all is that 
Ciiristian Science is a rehgion witliout a 
Savior. It dc>es not shrink from the blas- 
phemy that Christ Himself is Christian 
Science > page 231 ». On oage 242 oi 
"Science and Healtli** it says: "There is 
but one way ::■ heaven and harmony, and 
Christ. Divine Science, shows us this 
way." 

[Mrs. Eddy claims that Christian Sci- 
ence is the Holy Spirit, and all the Holy 
Spirit y;u iiave is Christian Science. On 
Aire 55 stie says: "This Comforter I 
-■-ierstand to be Divine Science" — refer- 
r::ig to the Holy Spirit. 

It also asserts that the blessed hope oi 
our Ltord's second coming is Christian 
Science. C>n page 96 of her "Autobiog- 
raphy" Mrs. Eddy says: "The second 
-ance of Jesus i- unquestionably the 
- - : ..al advent oi die advancing ^iea oi 
God in Christian Science." 

The whole system is L'nitarian in the- 
ology-: it claims tliat Tesus was a great 
:nan : that his dust lingers in the Sv^il of 
Palestine, and that what we know as the 
resurrection, and all we know of it. is 
Christian Science. 



164 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1907. 



^'Christian Science" in Relation to Sci= 
ence. 

Now as to science. A\'e have some- 
thing in the AWird of God about "science 
falsely so called, which some professing 
have erred concerning the faith." What 
is science ?* It is defined as "knowledge 
gained and verified by exact observation 
and correct thinking;" that is,' science is 
the knowledge of facts and the laws 
which govern these facts. God has given 
us five senses by which we may gain this 
knowledge and verify it. Christian Sci- 
ence denies the reality of the five senses, 
and says (page 293, ''Science and 
Health") that "the five physical senses 
are the avenues and instruments of hu- 
man error." To Christian Science mat- 
ter has no reality. Christian Science is 
thus seen to be not only unscientific, but 
anti-scientific, in that it denies the trust- 
worthiness of knowledge gained and ver- 
ified through the five senses. Anatomy 
and physiology are things which have 
to do with the structure and functions of 
the human body; the science of surgery, 
which has been of such blessing to the 
human race, is based on the science of 
physical being. 

The development of the sciences of 
sanitation and hygiene has marked the 
growth of modern civilization. By ap- 
plying the laws of sanitation, the great 
plagues of the cities of Europe have been 
prevented, and Havana has been made 
about as healthful as Chicago. Christian 
Science, if its principles were really ac- 
cepted and acted out, would destroy all 
sanitation and bring back disease and the 
devouring plague. It recognizes no board 
of health ; no system of sewerage, except 
as a concession to public sentiment. On 
page 175 of "Science and Health" are 
the words : "When there are fewer doc- 
tors and less thought is given to sani- 
tary subjects there will be better consti- 
tutions and less disease." On the same 
page the motto is quoted with approval: 
"Where ignorance is bliss, it is folly to 
be wise." So you see that while science 
seeks knowledge. Christian Science seeks 
ignorance. While science would turn on 
the light, "Christian Science" (so called) 
would leave the world in darkness as to 
the laws of health. 



Water is the most imiportant element in 
producing cleanliness ; I think you will 
agree to that proposition; and yet, 
strange to say, Mrs. Eddy is opposed to 
the use of water ; and if Christian Sci-- 
entists follow strictly her teaching, they 
cannot consistently take a bath in water, 
or wash their face and hands. "Bathing 
and rubbing," she says in this text-book, 
"to alter the secretions or remove un- 
healthy exhalations from the cuticle, re- 
ceive a useful rebuke from Christian 
healing." Again she says : "We need a 
clean body and a clean mind ; a body 
rendered pure by mmd, not by matter. 
One says, T take good care of my body.' 
No doubt he attends to it with as much 
care as he would the grooming of his 
horse '^ * "^ but the Scientist takes 
the best care of his body when he leaves 
it most out of his thought." She goes 
further and says: "The daily ablutions 
of an infant are no more natural or nev. 
essary than it would be to take a fish out 
of water once a day and cover it with 
dirt, in order to make it thrive more vig- 
orously thereafter in its native element.' 

That is in the Bible of Christian Sci- 
ence, quoted literally. They are willing 
to make imagination a God ; to have 
bathing in "mind" take the place of 
washing their bodies. If Christian Sci- 
entists practice daity ablutions, they do 
it because they reasonably reject the 
teaching that such things are unneces- 
sary in Christian Science. 

Dentistry is a science which Mrs. Eddy 
and her followers patronize, though un- 
der protest. When she has a toothache 
she goes to a dentist, as any sensible 
woman ought to ; and I have the affidavit 
to that effect of a dentist in Concord. He 
says in his affidavit that she was the most 
sensitive patient to pain that he had ever 
treated, and one day as he was showing 
her out, after a treatment which seemed 
to give her great agony, he could not 
help saying, "Mrs. Eddy, this is a trifle 
inconsistent with the teaching of Chris- 
tian Science." She changed her dentist, 
and never came back any more. He lost 
her trade. This of course is very incon- 
sistent ; but the pain, which they declare 
has no reality, compels them to sit down 
in a dentist's chair, which has no realltv ; 



Oetober, 190T. 



CHKlJSTlAxN CYNOSURE. 



165 



■Open their physical mouths, which have 
no reaUty; and allow the dentist, whose 
bod}^ has no reality, to use his tool, which 
has no reality, upon their teeth, which 
have no reality — and yet they do it! 

Ali this goes to confirm the saying of 
Dr. Hudson, that our Christian Science 
friends are lacking- in a healthy, protect- 
ive sense of humor. Wc ought to prav 
God to develop in thcni a good, healthy 
sense of humor. 

I attended a great Christian vScience 
testimon3'-meeting in Boston, and I tried 
to behave ; I did the best I could, I kept 
my face as straight as I could. One sis- 
ter rose — there were eight women who 
spoke, and one man — she said that her 
boy had stuck a nail in his "foot, and she 
said, "Now God is everything, every- 
thing is God, God has no nail in his foot. 
therefore there is no hole in my boy's 
foot ; I denied the whole thing, and as a 
result I kept him on his bicycle." I have 
known a boy to have a nail in his foot, 
and have it taken out, and play baseball 
next day, without any Christian Science 
treatment ; and yet that story was told 
with a solemn, serious face, and among 
the hearers there was a solemnity that 
was unbrokenly preserved. One woman 
said she saw a man run over by a trolley 
car, and carried bruised and bleeding into 
a drug store. She v/ent into the drug- 
store and fourrd him lying senseless. She 
went up to him and said, "There is noth- 
ing the matter with you.'' whereupon he 
opened his eyes and they carried him oil* 
home. Then she went up to the police- 
man and said. "I want 3'ou to understand, 
sir, that man would liave died if 't had 
not been for my Christian Science treat- 
ment." 

Nobodv smiled— solemn as a grave- 
yard. 

They did not say anything about what 
I heard took place in Boston. A man, 
lame, very lame, limped out of his house 
day after day, and a Christian Science 
woman, not knowing- him, decided to 
give him absent trealment ; and one day 
she saw that he was getting better, he 
did not limp at all. She said, 'T must 
let him know that I have cured him," 
and she went over to pay him a call, and 
told him she had been eivine him ibsent 



treatment for so long,' and" she v/anted 
him to recognize the fact that she had 
cured him. '.'Well," he said, "I changed 
my wooden leg for a cork leg." She did 
not smile — took it all in — she believed 
that Christian Science treatment 
changed the Vv^ooden leg to a cork leg 
and cured it; of course it could do that 
as well as it could do an}'thing el:,e ! 

The Ethics of "Christian Science." 

Xow as to the ethics of Christian Sci- 
ence. I hesitate to approach that. Let 
us look at it squarely for a few minutes. 
What is the Christian Science standard 
of ethics? It cannot be the will of God. 
for God has no will, according to Chris- 
tian Science; only a personality can liave 
a will. It is hardly possible for ihe ten 
commandments to be the standard of 
Christian Science, for it denies the ex- 
istence of the very things the ten com- 
mandments forbid. It denies the ver}' 
existence of any such thing as adultery, 
or lying, or stealing. God is everything. 
You can take their treatments and prove 
that God is evil just as easily as you can 
prove that God is g-ood. God is every- 
thing, and everything is God ; therefore 
God is evil. One conclusion is just as 
logical as the other ; both are illogical, 
because based on a false premise. 

As far as I can see, the only standard 
of ethics which Christian Science exalts 
is the will of Mrs. Eddy, as express'^d in 
her book and personal orders. In March. 
1897, Mrs. Eddy sent out to all the 
Christian Scientists of the United States 
and Canada an order commandini^- them 
to sell her books, and saying that if a 
member of the First Church in Boston 
failed to observe this injunction it would 
render liim liable to lose his membership 
in this church ; and so she turned the 
whole Christian Science church into a 
book agency, and would not let the mem- 
bers practice for one year — the book was 
to take the place of the practitioner for 
one year. ^Irs. Eddy's will has been law, 
as far as T can see. She has her agents 
to go all over the country as lecturers : 
you never heard a Christian Science lec- 
turer who did n(~>t name her and her book 
anil her as the author : she must be 
praised ; she retains a man to look after 
sucli things, just as vou would retain a 



^^■^] 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October. 1907. 



lawyer. That is the reason you have so 
mail}- judg-es and o-reat hiwyers wlio are 
Christian Science lecturers. 

The Christian Science organization, 
with millions of dollars back of it, and 
her millions at its disposal, can employ 
lawyers and retain them and pay them : 
the}' retain them to stand by their cause 
just as they would by the cause of a 
client. When a preacher comes out in a 
paper with something against Christian 
Science, in a small town of from ttn to 
fifteen tliousand people, the biggest law- 
yer in the place is apt to come ont the 
next day with a two or three column 
article with his name to it, and all his 
weig-ht is thrown on the side of Chris- 
tian Science He does not care a fig for 
it, except that he is employed to advocate 
it ; and when he is once committed to it, 
he must stand by it. The Christian Sci- 
ence church has its press agents ail over 
the country, and salaried. One of them 
is here to-night, I will warrant you ; I 
would like to meet him when 1 get 
through. Every town of any import- 
ance at all has a press agent, whose busi- 
ness it is to attend such meetings as this. 
It is a great thing- to be near the scene of 
action. The trust sends out its tentacles 
all over the country and the world. The 
Scientist organization does the same. The 
investigation that is going- on now, I 
think, will reveal some interesting facts. 

If it b€ true that the will of Mrs. Eddy 
has been, and is, the standard of ethics 
of Christian Science, Mrs. Eddy should 
be an ideal woman. Christianity exalts 
the will of Jesus as its standard. ^ If it 
could be shown that Jesus Christ ever 
told a falsehood, Christianity would lose 
its right to live. Do the facts warrant 
us in believing that Mrs. Eddy has 
been ideal in character? It pains me to 
have to say what loyalty to Christ and 
the truth demands ; I shrink from it in 
every fiber of my being ; and yet I am 
obliged now to say it, because the trutii 
of God demands that we shall be faithful 
to the lessons of the Bible, and lest any 
should be lured into this soul-destroying 
error by the claim that its founder is and 
has been an ideal character. If you will 
read AlcClure's Magazine, beginning 
with Januar}', 1907, you will find some of 



the facts which go to establish wliat I 
am going to say — an awful thing. I 
learned all these facts while I was in 
Boston, by personal investigation, though 
I did not take the sworn affidavits, as' 
McClure's has. I spent until four o'clock 
Sunda}' morning one night in prayer to 
God, asking His guidance as to whether 
I should not dump the whole vile busi- 
ness out on the Boston Commons in a 
sermon next morning. I decided to let 
the lawyers fight it out along that line, 
and let them investigate, and that I would 
just hold up the Christ; but I have had 
to tell the truth, and everybody ought to 
know it, however much we may shrink 
from it. I say the facts prove, and they 
can be established in court, that Mrs. 
Eddy has, from her early womanhood, 
been degenerate in character. Now that 
is an awful thing to say about anybody, 
but the facts prove it, and you cannot 
deny the facts. There are two kinds of 
degeneracy — the degeneracy of insanity 
and the degeneracy of wickedness. In- 
sane people are deg-enerate, but must not 
be held accountable ; wicked people are 
held accountable, they are responsible for 
their wickedness. You may explain Mrs. 
Eddy's degeneracy as of either kind— 
that is, wickedness or insanity — but the 
degeneracy has been there since her very 
early womanhood. Only an insane or 
wicked woman w^ould forsake her son at 
eight years of age and not see him again 
for twenty years ; and then claim, con- 
trary to the facts, that her relatives kept 
him from her. Only an insane or wick- 
ed woman would claim that she received 
the matter of the book that she has writ- 
ten as a direct revelation from God, 
whereas many witnesses testify under 
oath that she read them its contents from 
the manuscript of Doctor P. P. Ouimby, 
of Portland, Maine, and told them that it 
was from that manuscript. Only an in- 
sane or wicked woman would be for 
years a spiritualistic medium, h(Viding 
seances with her friends, and then deny 
that she was a spiritualist. Only an in- 
sane or wicked woman would go into 
the home of friends and strive to sep- 
arate husband and wife. Only an insane 
or wicked woman would in an angry fit 
cut the matting, rip the curtains and 



Oi-tober, 1!H>T. 



CHHISTIAN CYNOSUItK. 



throw a shovel of hot coals in a closet 
upon papers for the purpose of biiniino- 
itp a sick man in the house, who hail of- 
fended her. You can read in McClurc's 
Magazine the sworn affidavits of the man 
who saw this ; and the explanations of 
her being- expelled from home after home 
will come out after n while, if the truth 
is told. It is painful to say this, hut you 
have to do it if you v.ould be a pro])liet, 
of (iod. It is the truth in regard to the 
one who sets herself up above Jesus 
Christ, and the Holy Spirit, and the 
Bible, which is the anchor of our ho])e. 

Cures by "Christian Science." 

Now the practical question which re- 
mains is this : How can we explam 
"cures'' which have been . wrought by 
Christian Science? In three or four 
w^a}s. First, many people who have been 
"cured" were never sick. Mrs. Eddy 
herself has been a hysteric all her life: 
everybody knows that who has come in 
touch with her. The fact showed itself 
in conversations, and it produced a ten:- 
per which frightened her poor old father 
many a time, as I have said ; which de- 
prived her of the advantages of a good 
education ; which has made her the banc 
of many a home — from which, in self-de- 
fense, the family has had to expel her 
sometimes. A hysteric woman of thai 
kind can get sick and be cured three 
times a week without any trouble at all. 
You can find record after record, in med- 
ical books, of cases of that kind. And hov/ 
was Mrs. Eddy cured? She says in the 
Bible of Christian Science that on the 
first day of February, 1866, she fell on 
the ice in the city of Eynn, and was hurt 
severely — incurable. Dr. A. M. Cushing 
was called in to attend her. The third 
day after her fall she was wonder- 
fully healed, so that Doctor Cush- 
ing himself could not understand the 
marvel of it. Doctor Cushing is 
still living in the town of Springfield. 
He sometimes comes to Chicago. I tliink 
I will get him to come to Chicago some- 
time and give his experience. He makes 
his sworn affidavit, published in \Ic- 
Clure's Magazine, that on the hrst da\' 
of February, 1866, he was called in to 
see Mrs. Patterson, who had fallen or. 
the ice. He treated her thirteen (la\s. 



under morphine, anil carried her u])- 
stairs. She was free from ]3ain wlien un- 
der the influence of morphine ; she di^i 
not recognize him. On the thirteentn 
day she thanked him for the good treat- 
ment he had given her. and the splcnrlid 
cure lie had made, and there was never a 
word about incural^lcness, and nothing 
a1)out a miracle, ^'ou liave the sworn 
affidavit of the man \s]i(j>e name sin.' uses 
in her book, that the claim was absolute- 
ly false, and that he administered mor- 
phine. I do not know how you would 
explain it, but some ]jeople become so 
imaginative that the sense of reality an*] 
imagination blend, and they do not know 
what happens — es])eci:dly hysteric crea- 
tures. 

In the second place, many Christian 
Scientists who claim to have been healed 
are still sick. 1 think I can prove that 
to a demonstration. The}' begin the 
process of treatment b) insisting they are 
well; that is the first step. Xo matter 
how^ sick they are, they are well. If Mrs. 
Eddy were dying, therefore, she would 
have to say she was v.ell, or give up her 
cult. 

A practitioner was called in to see j 
}oung woman in Massachusetts who was 
dying of consumption. The first thing- 
she said to the patient was : ''You are 
all right : there is nothing the matter 
with you." The patient said, "Why in 
the world do you think I sent for }-ou, if 
there is nothing the matter with me?" 
and because the patient would not con- 
sent to a falsehood, the practitioner 
could not do her any good, so she said : 
but nevertheless she sent in a bill for ten 
dollars. 

The Christian Scientist patients in the 
smallpox hospital in Boston steadtastly 
declared that there was nothing the mat- 
ter with them, thougii they were all brok- 
en out with smalli^iox : every one of them 
said that the\- were well, with smallpox 
all over them ; and for them to den\- that 
the}' were well would be io give up their 
cult, for there i^ no such thing in the 
world as sickness — it has no realit}'. 

I re])eat it, by the ordinar}' standard oi 
Christian ethics, the Christian Scientist 
cannot l)e trusted \vhen he sa}'s he is 
well; for the princinks of his cnh re- 



168 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1901 



quire him to say while he is sick, that 
he is perfectly well. So I think it is es- 
tablished that a large number who claim 
to be well are still sick. Thousands of 
sick people are to-day declaring" that they 
are well, hoping by such a declaration to 
become well. But you can see how, on 
the strength of this, a universal procla- 
mation is made that there have been 
many cures, when there have been few 
or none. 

In the third place, some diseases, espe- 
cially nervous diseases, can be removed 
by mental process. The patient needs 
to be cheered, and the false assumption 
that there is nothing the matter with him 
causes him to be cheered. If a patient 
has a little imagination, the same result 
is often produced by bread pills. Mrs. 
Eddy tells us that she healed a man of 
typhoid fever by means of a little water 
with a slight solution of salt ; and she 
healed another with unmedicated pills. 
If she had kept on with the salt and un- 
medicated pills she would have done less 
hami. 

I could give you instances of people 
who were sick and were cured quickly. 
A young woman was engaged to a young 
man — a bright, beautiful woman ; the 
young man jilted her and married anoth- 
er Avoman ; that nervous girl collapsed 
and went to bed, and stayed there for six 
years. I visited her as a pastor. A foot- 
fall on the floor would throw her into 
convulsions ; her friends would have to 
run and hold her down. She was sick 
for six years. You need not smile un- 
less you want to — I am just giving you 
facts — that young mian's wife died, and 
I saw the sick girl riding out in a buggy 
within a week. She has been well ever 
since. Now you can explain that just 
as you please. The young man did not 
marry her ; he went off and married an- 
other woman. I suppose she got so an- 
gry then that she made herself sick. But 
I know that she was so sick for six 
years, and just a change of mental atti- 
tude made her well. 

Sir Humphrey Davy tells us that he 
went to see a patient, and to test the 
fever he put his thermometer under his 
tongue. After it had stayed there a min- 
ute the patient said, 'T feel better." He 



left the thermometer in his mouth and 
the sick man got well; cured by a ther- 
mometer ! And there are nervous, hys- 
terical people who can be cured in just 
such ways. 

Everything, from a patent medicine to 
a religion, depends upon healing for its. 
establishment; and it is the easiest thing 
in the world. There is more humbug- 
gery about healing than everything else 
put together. There are mental process- 
es that can cure diseases which have their 
origin in mental worries. 

You will find among Christian Scien- 
tists a great many w^ealthy, intelligent so- 
ciety people, who have not much to do 
except to think of their aches and pains, 
and all these little things. They think 
they are very sick; somebody comes and 
tells them there is nothing the matter 
with them, and they believe it and get. 
well, and give a hundred thousand dol- 
lars. It is just that way in numerous 
cases. There are many Christian Scien- 
tists who think they are well when they 
are still sick, and you can explain the 
healing of a great many ; but, friends, 
w^ill you join with me in calling a mass- 
meeting of all whose friends have been 
killed, in good faith, by Christian Sci- 
ence ? The biggest auditorium in Chi- 
cago would not suffice 'to hold the fami- 
lies and friends whose loved ones have 
been killed by Christian Science, killed 
for lack of sensible treatment — little chil- 
dren, some of them, who could not pro- 
tect themselves. I could stand here un- 
til midnight. I believe, and gave you in- 
stances of m-en, women and children, who 
have been killed by the so-called Chris- 
tian Science treatment. 

An explanation of the healing can be 
found in Mark 13:22: "For false 
Christs and false pfophets shall rise, and 
shall show signs and wonders, to seduce. 
if it were possible, even the elect." It 
anybody is healed by the Christian Sci- 
ence process, it is a healing produced by 
false statements. You have to begin with 
a lie, by saying there is nothing the mat- 
ter- with you ; and have to accept the big- 
gest falsehood in this universe, that there 
is no evil, or sickness, or death ; and if 
the healing is done, it is done by a proc- 
ess of falsehood. So the process is a 



:h:ristia>' cynosure. 



T-rc'Ce-Si 



r ra^se: 



•i from, besiiuiinar to 



.^- ^ -■.-itian Soie-iiist said to a friend of 
:r.:ne: "A man came to me the other 
day with a bad case of inflammation of 
the eyes. sa>'inar that the d«Dctor thought 
'.'r "::-'": lose his sight. I told him never 
^ ^- 1 - :'- : ; admit that he had inflammation 
::' '.r- tyes, tor there is really no such 
-_-:.-:^-. 1 advised him to keep on denying 
it. and he wonld get well." My friend 
rephed. "You evidently advised that nian 
r-. tell a he. for you have just admitted 
-^-.at he had a bad case of inflam- 

\: r :f the cy&s: and if he is helped 
by your process , it will be by a process 
•;f lies, acording to vo-ur admission, and 
■i:::rding to the admission of the doctor 
that you say he went to.'*'' 

Xc-:v this certain!].- leads us to II. 
T h 1 5 : \ ■ - . :. r.s 2:9: "Whose coming is 
after -..it v/ irking of Satan with all pow- 
er and signs and Mng wonders."''' 

It is certain that Satan can rmpt-se evil 
for the woman in the gospel was bc'und 
of Satan many years I'Luke 13: 16). If 
he can cause a disease, he certainly caa 
rtrn'i Tr it : and if a person will yithi him- 
self z-j Satan. Satan will do all he can 
for him in the way of removing dis- 
eases that he can impose. When I say 
that, I am not saying that all peC'Die who 
prifess Christian: Science are wicked pei- 
ple. for Satan himself is transformed as 
a messenger of, light. I do not agree with 
Sir Robert Anderston that he never at- 
temp-ts the baser kind of wickedness any 
more : I do agree that the devil of the 
Christian Science church is not the real 
deYiL What he wants is ministers trans- 
formed as ministers of righteousness. 
He makes great claims, and his great 
mission is to lead men to accept a .sort of 
light, scientiflc hght — ^fust a little ray of 
-i^-h: — t ro vided they will be satisfied 
WLth the Light: and if he can satisfy' you 
with scientiflc history, with its tributes 
to the man. Jesus, he is perfectly satis- 
fled. .\nd when you yield to any sort of 
substirate f'Or the atonement of Jesus, you 
have rielded yourself to Satan. He 
wants to srive light that will displace the 
Ii:?ht ±at^aves a sou! :r:m ^ieath. 
"Christian Science" Healing Vs, Divine 
Healing. 

^ ■ : - : : -.he lible has promised to 



heal in answer ti ccavtr. i belitve ::. 
I know it. I have seen Him do it. He 

can heal with instrumentalities or with- 
out them, just as He sees flt : and when 
you get sick, you consult Gi-d flrst. send 
for Christ first and ask Him what he 
wants you to do. If it wiH be for Hh: 
glor>- for you to be healed without rem.e- 
dies. He can do it : ii he wants you uo use 
an instrumentality, use it. If He makes 
it clear that you should go to a hospital 
and receive the benefit of surgical aid. 
go. and He will bless the surgical aid: 
He is the author of it : the author of ev- 
erything that heals is God. You can als^.» 
depend upon Him to heal in answer to 
prayer. Sjm.etim.es the instrumentahr^ 
IS better than the miracle, immenselv bet- 
ter. I know God heals without rem.e- 
•dits : there is often healiag in answer zo 
prayer: but that is not Christian Science. 
Xever confuse Christian Science with di- 
vine healing, with the Gyi w'dc* answers 
the cr>- of His children. That is Chris- 
tianity. Asking Gjd for something: and 
getting it is the teaching of Jesus Christ . 
the *'^jd of CnristianirL- loves His people, 
and helps them because He is willing and 
powerful : but He will do it in the wav 
that He pleases. When I get into a ma- 
larial district, where peo-ole are amicted 
with chills. I usually take quinine, be- 
cause i believe that quinine is God's rem- 
edy r^cr chills, and I thank God for it. 
Wlien I get sick I as'it Gcd what He 
wants me to do : does He Liiend to heal 
me without me-iicine? If He makes it 
plain He does nor. I send for the best 
physician I can find, acid I trust 'Gz-d to 
do the healing through the me-lical skil! 
and the medicine, and I give God all the 
glon.-; it is His right. 

C^e cf the dearest friencs I have on 

earth was arricted year after year with an 
incurable disc:3.s€. She prayed f:- heal- 
ing, and I joined with her. The familv 
physician said one day. "It is the hos- 
pital and the operating: table, or death.'"'' 
Well, she shrunk frcm. that: she still 
cried to God to heal 'tier. She had a no- 
tion it was a terrible experience to go 
there, but by and by her heart be'Came 
•;uiet and restful, and she was certani 
that Christ would have her go and suf- 
fer the surgical operation. After six 



170 



CHKISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Octol.)er, 1907. 



weeks' of suftering and darkness she 
came out of the hospital, weaker than 
when she went in and feehng that per- 
haps the operation was a faihnx, but still 
crving to God. Within twelve months 
she was well, and has been well ever 
since. She would be dead but for that 
operation. I asked her, "Which would 
vou prefer — that God should have helped 
}-ou miraculously, or that you should 
have gone into the hospital and suffered 
in the" way you did?" She replied, "If 
God had helped me miraculously, I 
would have missed the best blessing of 
my life. I learned Jesus in that hospital 
the best I ever knew Him. I was srj 
hlled with glory I felt I would like to go 
through the pains again just to catch the 
gleanis of glory and to feel the- touch of 
His sympathetic hand." In healing her 
through means of the surgical operation 
God had blessed her soul more than if He 
had done it by a miracle. 

Jesus Christ answers prayer, but let 
me say this — it is prayer to a real God, 
to be healed from a real disease ; to be 
forgiven and saved from real sin, 
through Jesus Christ our Lord; to be 
saved from real guilt and real pollution, 
and a real hell. Men are saved by the 
sufferings of a real Savior, and the res- 
urrection of a real Christ, and the regen- 
eration of a real Holy Spirit; our real 
Father is always within speaking distance 
of every one of His children, and if I 
speak to one who has been swept away 
by this black current of error, 
Christian Science, I beg of you to 
come back to the God that . lives, 
and loves and helps in answer to prayer. 
Come back under the blood that cleanses 
and justifies, and walk in the light of the 
glory from that empty sepulchre whence 
the Lord has risen — in the light of the 
living Christ in your heart and your life. 



^Ir. Blanch ard; It is the work of 
the National Christian Association to 
seek to turn the minds of men to Jesus 
Christ as the remedy for all human ills, 
and especially for this great and crown- 
ing one — sin. We believe that all sys- 
tems of error are a unit in this one thing, 
that thev reject Jesus Christ as a real 
remedy for sin ; and it is the work of this 



Association to seek to intiuence those 
who are drifting away from the fold of 
Jesus Christ. 

I have been very glad myself to hear 
Dr. Dixon ; I am sure you all have.- 
There are two opinions, very likely, in' 
this room just now ; but there is only one 
truth as regards this matter ; and if we 
be true Christians, if we are to believe 
the Word of God, if we are to accept the 
testimony of the best witnesses, then it 
wall appear that the truth has been told 
here to-night. God has not made us the 
victims of our sins; He has made us to 
profit by them. We are in a real world, 
we are real people, we have real bodies, 
we have real spirits, we really suffer ; we 
admit we sometimes really sin, we need 
a real Savior and we have one, and any- 
one may avail himself of this remedv 
which God has provided, has offered, for 
the time present and for the time to' 
come. 

I trust that you will remember to pray 
for the great work which our Association 
is engaged In. 

Benediction by Dr. Evans. 



SUES BLACK HAND. 

First Suit of the Kind in the United 

States. 

(Special Dispatch to tlie Boston Herald.) 

Pittsburg, Pa., Aug. i8, 1907. — A re- 
markable suit has just been commenced 
at Xewxastle by Dominick Tuteno, an 
Italian, by his attorney, William J. Mof- 
fatt, against Fred Scarce, in which Tu- 
teno seeks to recover v$i,6oo which he de- 
clares was extorted from him by Scarce, 
who is declared to be a Black Hand lead- 
er. 

Some time ago Tuteno, who Is a 
wealthy business man of Newcastle, re- 
ceived a letter from Scarce in which he 
declared that unless he gave $1,600 he 
would forfeit his life to the Black Hand. 
Tuteno paid no attention at first, but 
when he received other letters, more 
threatening than the first, he finally sent 
Scarce the money. 

A demand was then made for more, 
which He refused to give and finally 
placed the matter in the hands of his at- 
torney, who brought the suit. It is be- 
lieved to be the first suit of the kind ever 
brouo"ht in this country. 



October, 1907. 



('HKIsriAN CYNOSURE. 



171 




SOME TYPICAL 

It may be interesting to glance at some 
typical Highbinders and leaders in the 
various Chinese societies. The faces pre- 
sent an interesting physiological study. 
Their histories may be briefly told in the 
following, taken, by the courtesy of Chief 
Crowley, of San Francisco, from the rec- 
ords of his department: 

No. I. Leong Yuen Gun, blackmailer 
and fighter, belonged to the Wah Ting 
Shan Fung Sotiety. He is serving a ten 
years' service in the State prison, for 
shooting Jare Hoy, on Dupont street. 



HIGHBINDERS. 

No. 2. Wong Fun Kim, member of 
the Che Kung Tong, a murderer and 
kidnaper. He was sent to the State ])ris- 
on from Humboldt County for man- 
slaughter, and from this city for steal- 
ing a Chinese woman. 

No. 3. Lee Sam., was arrested and 
charged with tlirowing vitrol intu tlie 
eyes of Fong Lin, an inmate of a house 
on Sulivan Alley. He is a prominent 
member of the Che Kung Tong Societ\', 
and is known to the police as a verv des- 
perate character. 
— Californian Illustrated Ma ga. zinc. 



HEP SING TONG AND FREE MASONS. 

In the course of its report of the shoot- 
ing of Chinamen in Boston, by a secret 
society, The Globe gave this interesting- 
interview with a Chinese Freemason : 

"Lon Sang at 8 Oxford place, who 
managed to escape injury, although fired 
at several times, smoked his long pipe 
contentedly as he looked at the broken 
door, the shattered glass and a small tea 
kettle, which had been plugged by one 
of the heavy rapid-firing revolvers. 

''V'elly bad men in that crowd," he 
said. 'T was sitting with two friends in 
street smoking and talking business. AH 
of a sudden manv men came rushing 



down through Oxford place firing re- 
volvers. 

"They didn't seem to care who they 
hit. AVe are all Freemasons, and the}' 
belonged to the Hep Sing Tong. My 
friends were hit by the bullets, and when 
I saw that they were hurt I jumped out 
of my chair and rushed into the house. 

"One of the leaders with a big black 
gun saw me break av\-a}- and came in 
after me. I banged the door, but he 
kicked it open. Into my little store T 
dashed quickly and closed it just as the 
outer door was smashed in. 

'T thought I was a dead man sure, as 
the bolt on the door -voulcl not work at 



172 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October. 100' 



lirst. Finally it slid into place and I 
ducked my head at the same time. I was 
very fortunate as a bullet came crashing 
through the glass door where I had been 
standmg and it struck the tea kettle on 
the small stove. 

"I was scared then and threw myself 
on the floor. I managed to crawl under 
the little counter, where I hid until the 
police came looking for me. The bullet 
glanced off the tea kettle and lodged in 
the floor, going through to the cellar.'' 



THE HEATHEN CHINEE. 

The pagan custom of belonging to 
secret socteties gave a good manifesta- 
tion of its natural character in the Chi- 
nese quarter of Boston, when bad blood 
brought bloodshed in the open street. 
There was bitter feeling between the Hep 
Smg Tong and the On Leong Tong. of 
whioh the police knew at tlie beginnhig 
of the year, but it was the evening of 
Aug. 2,' when the murderous outbreak 
suddenly occurred. The gang of mur- 
derers started down a street, each armed 
with a 44-caliber revolver and shooting 
as thev went. The police said they must 
all have been expert revolver shots. 

There was also a Chinese secret society 
war in Boston in 1903. when the police 
got hold of 258 persons. 113 of whom 
\\-ere deported. For lodges that are- dark 
and for societies that do not exist in vain. 
the heathen Chinese can hardly be called 
■ peculiar, but he is notable. Chinese secret 
society members are found as follows : 

^L-\SOXS. Some of those murdered 
were buried as Free ]vIasons. A cut of 
the interior of a Chinese lodge was m 
the Cynosure of September. In sucli a 
lodge 'a Toss had been said to be placed: 
and this may often occur, making the 
:\Iasonic Temple, a pagan temple more 
obviouslv. 

HEP'SIXG TOXG. Said to pro- 
tect gamblers, and to use power to pro- 
mote blackmail of Chinese laundrymen 
and merchants. Also said to employ 
murderers, ■'killers"" or "hatchet men." 
The Chinese are said to hold the Hep 
Sing Tong. as the oft-scouring of China. 
unscrupulous robbers of decent China- 
men. The Hep Sing Tong is accounted 
most pov.-erful of all Chinese Secret So- 



cities. and a tyrant to the Chinese e\'ery- 
where in the Cnited States. This order 
of reputed blackmailers and assassins,- 
was the one credited \Mth causing the 
shooting up of ChinaiOAvn m Boston. 

OX ^LEOXG TOXG. Formed to-. 
checkmate the Hep Sing Tong. 
The Chinese "Good Government Associ- 
ation."' to prevent blackmail of well-to-do 
Chinese, and to do away with assassina- 
tions. Americanized Chinese and the 
better class of colonists are found in 
this society, which is constantly in antag- 
onism toward the Flep Sings, who charge 
them with being as bad as anv. 

HIGHBIXDERS. Reckoned profes- 
sional murderers, who slay any oiie. with- 
out discrimination, for pay. These are 
the "killers'' or "hatchet men" said to be 
employed by the Hep Sing Tong order,, 
and the recent Boston assassins liad, be- 
sides revolvers, silver-plated hatchets.- 
Their headquarters in this countr}' are 
supposed to be in San Francisco : but 
constituent branches are believed to be 
in other large cities. It is believed that 
they tyrannize over every Chinese colony 
in the United States, ^nd that the}" are 
the actual perpetrators of murders in .any 
city's Chinatown, though they may be 
hired to do what the}' do not origmare. 
They are the oldest secret societ}' of 
China. 



CHINESE TRIADS. 

BY HEXRY v. X0YE5, D. D., CANTON, CHINA. 

The proposed purpose for which the 
society ('Triads^ was organized — viz.^ 
the regaining from the IManchus the gov- 
ernment of the Chinese Empire by the 
Chinese themselves — was not an un- 
worth}- purpose. Had that been the 
honest purpose and steadily adhered to 
and sought by justifiable means, the so- 
ciety would have had much s}-mpathv, 
and probably could long ago have ef- 
fected its design. But like many things- 
Chinese, the professed purpose is not 
the real purpose. The real purpose is 
power and plunder. The members of 
this society are bound by oath, under 
penalty of death, to help one another not 
only in things lawful, but in all manner 
of rascalitv. It is, wherever established, 
whether in China, Hong Kong, Singa- 



October, 1901 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUKE. 



173 



pore, in other colonial possessions, or in 
the United States, an "Imperium in im- 
perio.'' In China it has a central gov- 
ernment, as Mr. Dyer Ball tells us, of 
five grand masters of the five Grand 
Lodges of Fukien, Kwangtung, Yunnan, 
Hunan and Chikiang. 

This governing body then has some 
sort of control over millions of Chinese, 
not only in China itself, but throughout 
the world. One writer speaks of this or- 
ganization as an irresponsible tribunal, 
the foulest, the bloodiest, the most op- 
pressive of which there is record, on such 
a scale. Another says : "They engage 
to defend each other's crimes, to assist 
detected members in making their escape 
from justice." I know personally that in 
the United States the society answers to 
the above description. When I was in 
Sacramento in 1877, I knew where their 
headquarters wxre, and that at one time 
a sudden surprise by the police had been 
the means of obtaining the minutes of 
their meeting just being held, and that 
a part of the business was to arrange to 
pay, I heard it was $800, for the murder 
of some one whom it was thought de- 
sirable to get out of the way. I was told 
by those whom I believed that it was 
generally known by the Chinese that 
when any one wished to injure or kill 
an enemy he had only to pay a sufficient 
amount to this society and it would do 
the disgraceful- business for him. 

In British colonies its iniquities have 
been equally manifest. As long ago as 
1845 the Hong Kong government found 
it necessary to enact that ''Any Chinese 
living in that colony who was ascertained 
to belong to the Triad Society should be 
declared guilty of felony, be imprisoned 
for three years, and after branding, ex- 
pelled from the colony." In 1887, by an- 
other enactment the "Triad Society" is 
declared "to be unlawful, and the man- 
ager and office bearers are liable to a 
fine of a thousand dollars and imprison- 
ment for one year." Mr. Dyer Ball tells 
us that some of the prominent members 
have been deported by the Hong Kong- 
government, when necessity arose for it, 
for unfortunately in this colony they 
have degenerated into nests of thieves 
and bands of robbers. 



Drastic measures to suppress this so- 
ciety have also been found necessary in 
Singapore and Penang and other places 
where it has "been established. There 
are those who think the troubles of the 
past two or three years, in Kwangsi are 
traceable to this society. One thing is 
certain, it is quite capable of doing all 
that has been done there without a sigh 
of regret. We can hardly look to this 
society to overthrow the present govern- 
ment and set up a righteous one instead. 
When we consider that Triads abound in 
Lien-chou, and for the last year or two 
have had the officials so under their 
thumb that they could carry on their 
wicked work without let or hindrance, 
it is not very difiicult to account for the 
Lien-chou tragedy. 
— New York Observer. 



HOW THE LODGE DOMINATES THE 
LOCAL CHURCH. 

BY REV. G. A. PEGRAM. 

In my last article (June, 1907, Cyno- 
sure, page 35) I endeavored to show how 
the Lodge manipulates the ministers' ap- 
pointments so as to secure to its mem- 
bers all the good positions. In this I 
desire to show how the Lodge System 
manipulates the administration of the af- 
fairs of the local church. 

Wherever the secret society is' found 
it is the same old institution of political 
chicanery. Whatever the pretenses or 
professed principles of secret societies, 
every one of them forms a political ring 
in any community where it is found. The 
professed principles of the Lodge merely 
constitutes a good cloak for its cardinal 
practices. For every observing man 
knows that the practices of most lodges 
are utterly at variance with the principles 
so pompously and persistently paraded 
in public. Most members, in apologiz- 
ing for the Lodge, usually say : "The 
rules of the lodge are all right, if the 
members would only live up to them." 
This plainly implies that it is a fact, 
recognized even by lodge men, that most 
lodge members do not practice what the 
lodge teaches. But pretenses amount to 
nothing when facts are present and 
plenty. I do not appeal to isolated cases, 
but common practices. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1907. 



How Pastors Use Their Lodge "Pull. " 

In the lirst place I desire to speak of 
how pastors who are lodge men make 
use of the lodge in church affairs. 

People carry their temper and train- 
ing, whatever they are, into their work. 
This is very true of lodge training. Men 
and women trained in lodges are con- 
tinually manifesting the training of the 
lodge, as well as the self-seeking disposi- 
tion which carried them into the lodge. 

Both ministers and church members 
are constantly urged to join the lodge 
because it wd'll help them in their work, 
business or profession. If they join for 
the help or "pull" it oft'ers, they will sure- 
ly avail themselves of the help or "pull" 
it gives. Observation shows that minis- 
ters use their lodge ties to further their 
own interests, as well as those of their 
churches. 

On several charges which I served as 
pastor, I succeeded ministers who were 
lodgemen. The church records showed 
that most of the members which my 
predecessors had taken in the church 
were members of the same lodge as tlie 
pastor. Do lodgemen deny this? More 
than once I have been told that if I would 
join lodges I could get into closer touch 
with lodgemen, and could get them to 
the church, and into the church.. Of 
course, if ministers are persuaded by this 
plea to join a lodge, they will make use 
of the lodge to gain their object. And if 
lodgemen advocate this plea in order to 
secure members, of course they will work 
to make good their claims. If both lodge 
ministers and lay members work for the 
same end, their success, if they have any, 
will be along the line of their endeavors. 

Then, again, a preacher's ''converts" 
usually come from the crowds or kind 
of people he associates with. If he asso- 
ciates with the lodge people, his particu- 
lar friends, and converts, too, will be 
lodge people. 

Sometimes we see the lodge folks try- 
ing to ''boost" their lodge preacher by 
boosting his church, or his work. Some 
one says, "Is this not a good thing?" I 
answer emphatically, "No," for several 
reasons : 

First — The same spirit which will 
boost one minister because he is a lodge 



man will try to hinder and injure a min- 
ister who is not a lodgeman. Nearly all 
the trouble I have had as a minister has 
been with lodgemen. 

Second — People who are won to a 
church by a minister simply because he is 
a lodgeman, will usually need a lodge 
minister to hold them in the church. Such 
people can scarcely tolerate any man as 
pastor, no matter how good or able, un- 
less he belongs to the lodge. They are 
the very kind of people who "raise the 
devil" against the minister who is not a 
lodgeman. 

Third — Using worldly means to build 
up a church makes a worldly church, and 
makes a minister who employs such 
means -worldly, if he is not so already. 
It only brings the world into the church, 
and does not convert the world to the 
church or to God either. Christ is the 
attractive power of the Christian religion. 
Lodges eliminate Christ from the 
churches which they control, as well as 
from their own rituals. No church abso- 
lutely forbidding secret societies ever ob- 
jects to the preaching of the cross or the 
blood of Christ. 

Fourth — A woe is pronounced upon 
those who "go down to Egypt for help" 
(Isaiah 31 : i ). For they are those who 
daub with untempered mortar. Both the 
wall and those who build it shall fall 
(Ezek. 13:10-16). Christian work abides. 
Lodge Sentiment in the Local Church. 

On my last charge there w^ere in the 
neighborhood quite a number of persons 
who professed Holiness. As is always 
the case with true Holiness people, they 
were opposed to all forms of intemper- 
ance, secret societies, and all mere worldy 
amusements. I was anxious to get them 
into the church. Several had already 
promised to join. I spoke about the mat- 
ter to one of the officers of the church. 
He was bitterly opposed to Holiness, and 
belonged to several secret societies. He 
immediately declared he did not want 
them in the church, and said it would be 
better to get those like them out. 

If they had been opposed to Holiness 
and in favor of secret societies, they 
would have met with hearty welcome. 

On the same charge, I asked a lady 
who was an official member for the names 



October, 11X)T, 



ClIltlSTlAN CYNOSURE. 



175 



of a number of people for whose salva- 
tion and union with the church I might 
work. She very promptly gave me the 
names of several persons who were mem- 
bers of her lodge. 

This sentiment is also very evident in 
another way. I have been acquainted 
with quite a number of both ministers 
and laymen who have been persecuted 
out of the Methodist church ; and every 
one of them which I now recall was op- 
posed to secret societies. 

I have noticed further that the most per- 
secuted people /// the church are those 
who were opposed to the Lodge System. 
This persecution has become so frequent 
that I could no longer invite an anti- 
lodge man or woman to join the Method- 
ist church, because it means either com- 
promise or persecution for them, sure. 
Even while a pastor, and people were 
speaking of joining my own church, I 
have had to advise them not to join for 
the sake of their peace of mind. 

Furthermore, I want to advise every 
earnest Christian who is opposed to secret 
societies, for the sake of his peace of 
mind and spiritual prosperity, never to 
join any church of any denomination 
which is controlled by secret societies. 
For I have never yet seen one church of 
that kind wdiich would do the fair thing 
by an anti-lodge man, no matter how 
good, fair, kin/1 or reasonable he might 
be. 

Church Offices Filled by Lodge Members. 

Another way in \\-hicli lodges control 
churches is by getting all its offices filled 
b}^ lodge members. 

In the days of Captain Wm. Morgan, 
the Freemasons boasted that all the prom- 
inent offices of the country were held by 
men of the fraternity. In churches v\'hich 
tolerate secret societies, lodge men might 
boast that most of the offices of such 
churches are in their hands. 

In looking over my old pastor's diary. 
I find that approximately three-fourths of 
all the church offices of the charges 
which I served were filled by lodge mem- 
bers. One of the best old men I had on 
one charge told me that when my prede- 
cessor learned that he was opposed to se- 
cret societies, he removed him fronn of- 
fice. Another man, a seceder from three 



lodges, told me that when he was con- 
verted his pastor rushed him into the 
church, and as" soon as his probation was 
ended took him into full membership. 
Then he immediately nominated him as 
steward. As soon as he was .elected, the 
pastor said to him, "Brother Blank, we 
( )ddfellows are pledged to help one an- 
other. Xow you rush my salary." 

This gives an insigiU into the way pas- 
tors rush fellow lodgemen into church 
offices until nearly ail are held bv lodge 
men. I have heard of pastors who pack- 
ed their Quarterly Conferences in that 
way. Then they could practically run the 
church to suit themselves, and woe be 
unto any man, either in the church or out, 
who dared to raise his voice against such 
high-handed tyranny. 

On my last charge I found that the 
families of Odd Fellows held twenty-one 
out of thirty-five offices of one class. At 
a Sunday school election they- voted out 
four of the best members of the church, 
and put in two members of those fami- 
lies and two other' persons who were un- 
der lodge influence. In another class, 
one ]\Iason held three offices, and his 
brother-in-law% an Oddfellow, held two. 
Another Mason held three offices and his 
son-in-law two. The latter w^as not a 
lodgeman, but he was led by his father- 
in-law, and probabl}" would not have had 
an office had he not been related to a 
lodgeman. Xot another one of the thirty- 
five members held a church office, though 
a few held offices in the Sunday-school. 

At one place I was told that the pas- 
tor, who was an Oddfellow, when he left 
town would always seek a fellow lodge- 
man to look after the affairs of the 
church till he returned. That man was 
neither a eluiveli-nicniher nor a profess- 
ing CJiristiaii. That church had over fifty 
members, and some of them were excel- 
lent Christians and intelligent. But a 
lodge minister preferred an ungodly fel- 
low lodgeman to any of them. 

The Spirit of Organized Secrecy. 

One is not so much astonished, after 
all, to see lodge ministers pack their 
Ouarterl}- Conferences with lodgemen, 
when he knows the spirit of organized 
secrecy. The people on the outside do 
not alwa\s sec what the matter is, and 



176 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1907. 



some presiding elders do not, or dare not 
mention it. Still everybody realizes that 
something is wrong. 

AMiere lodgeism is strong, both min- 
isters and members will try to make the 
church subservient to the lodge. I have 
known ministers to refuse to let their 
churches be used for a Temperance ser- 
mon, or a W. C. T. U. convention, yet 
would preach sermons for the Lodge, 
and would let the Lodge use their 
churches for any of its services. 

Lodge Ministers' Procedure and the Re= 
suits. 

Lodge ministers usually try to win 
over the lodge element the first thing. 

At the close of conference the appoint- 
ments were read. One minister, a twen- 
ty-second degree Mason, was told that 
he would have to be careful on his new 
charge, as the people there were divided 
on the subject of secret societies. He 
told his informant, ''One of the first 
things I will do will be to give a lecture 
on Masonry." This he did. He had 
great apparent success the first year, and 
what seemed to be a great revival. The 
next year everything seemed to become 
dead,Vnd the whole thing was seen to be 
a colossal failure. He built on the sand, 
and the building fell. 

I have heard of evangelists using their 
lodge connections for a "pull." I once 
employed an evangelist, who was a 
thirty-second degree Mason. I noticed 
that he attracted the attention of but few 
outside the regular congregation except 
some lodge men. There were but three 
seekers after salvation, and they were all 
lodge members. I wondered at first. 
Then I noticed him holding people by 
the hand, giving them the Masonic grip. 
One lady told me he gave her the Ma- 
sonic grip. When he learned that I was 
opposed to secret societies he gave me a 
tirade of abuse in private, and abused 
me in public, too. He declared that the 
Masonic ritual was just as good as the 
Methodist Discipline, and that if I had 
the love of God in my heart I would not 
oppose lodges. I gave him a tract by 
Col. George R. Clarke. He declared 
that Clarke was turned out of the lodge 
for not paying his debts. This contra- 



dicts Clarke's own statements. He said 
he was present at the time. 

I told him he would have to loosen his 
hold on Masonry or lose his hold on 
God. This conversation was after the 
revival meeting at a camp meeting. He 
preached the following afternoon. It 
was the deadest sermon during the meet- 
ing. He told the people it was because 
they were not praying. I thought it was 
because he had been lying. He had been 
very successful before. I never heard of 
him having another successful meeting. 
A minister cannot lie, or defend a sys- 
tem or an institution of lies, and receive 
the blessing of God. In about a year 
and a half he had backslidden, became a 
drunkard, and left his wife. Another 
Mason told me he had some years before 
posed as a reformed drunkard and an 
evangelist here in Michigan, under an- 
other name. 

I heard of another evangelist who 
took for his text: "For I determined to 
know nothing among you save Jesus 
Christ, and Him crucified." Another 
man was pleading with, a young man to 
come to Christ, and quoted from the 
evangelist's sermon. The young man, 
who was a Mason, said the evangelist 
was a hypocrite. The other rebuked him. 
But the young man said the evangelist 
took that text, and then stepped from 
behind the pulpit and gave the Masonic 
sign before he began his sermon, and 
that was acting a hypocrite. 

How many others do the same thing, 
but are not recognized, or are not given 
away. 

Another evangelist saw he was not car- 
rying the people with him. He opened 
his coat, pointed to the square and com- 
pass, and said : "Brethren, that is what 
I work on." 

No wonder conversions are spurious 
under such work and preaching. 

Under date of September i6th Brother 
A. J. Millard, of Little Rock, Ark., writes 
of preaching at a colored Baptist church, 
in September, on the Lodge Question, 
and that one of the direct results of his 
service was that the following Monday 
night the church had a meeting at whicli 
five of the seven deacons publicly re- 
nounced their lodge membership. 



October, 1907, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



177 



tutorial 



The crusade against high school fra- 
ternities marches right along. The su- 
perintendent of the Chicago schools an- 
nounces the determination of the Board 
of Education to enforce strictly its regu- 
lation against the high school "frat." Ev- 
ery member of a secret society is to be 
barred from all public recognition. The 
Chicago Tribune of August 30th says 
editorially: 'Tt is intolerable that a few- 
boys and girls should set at defiance the 
authority which ought to control.'' 



We wish to call attention in this num- 
ber to the second article by Rev. G. A. 
Pegram, Michigan vState Agent, "How^ 
the Lodge Dominates the Local Church." 
There was a demand for his former arti- 
cle to be printed in tract form. Doubt- 
less this one W'ill be of equal interest to 
our readers. 

Our Michigan friends are not fully 
awake to the opportunity that is before 
them of engaging a man of the versatil- 
ity and ability of their present State 
Agent. We hear that his Bible Read- 
ings, as well as his addresses on Secret- 
ism, are not only very much appreciated 
but very helpful. Elis August report is 
before us, w^hich show^s that during the 
month he gaVe eight sermons, three Bi- 
ble Readings, and held ten meetings in 
the interests of the anti-secrecy w^ork. 
There ought to be a more generous finan- 
cial support. Will not every Cynosure 
reader in Michigan sit down at once, and 
send a contribution for your State Agent 
to Rev. H. A. Day, Treasurer, 35 Crosby 
street, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



A VALUABLE GIFT. 

The National Christian Association has 
received from Rev. R. T. Cross, a Con- 
gregational pastor at Denver, Colorado, 
a very old and interesting Masonic pub- 
lication. We think that every reader of 
the Cynosure will appreciate Rev. Dr. 
Cross' generosity in putting into our li- 
brary a Masonic history some one hun- 
dred and fifty years old, and that they 
will be especially interested in the ac- 



count of the action of the Associate 
Synod of Scotland concerning the Ma- 
sonic oath, which action w^as the result 
of several overtures, the first one made 
about tw^enty-eight years after the birth 
of i^reemasonry, namely, on the 7th of 
March, 1745, and which action was pub- 
lished in the Scots Magazine for August, 
1757, and answered by the Ereemasons 
in the Edinburgh :\Iagazine of October of 
the same year. In this number we quote 
from this Masonic history but the con- 
cluding paragraphs from the action of 
the Associate Synod. 

"And the synod further appoint, that 
when persons are found to be involved in 
the Mason-oath, according to their con- 
fessions in giving plain and particular an- 
swers to the foregoing questions and 
professing their sorrow for the same ; the 
said scandal shall be purged by a session- 
al rebuke and admonition — with a strict 
charge to abstain from all concern after- 
w^ards in administering the said oath 10 
any, or enticing- any into that snare, and 
from all practices of amusing people 
about the pretended mysteries of their 
signs and secrets. But that persons who 
shall refuse or shift to give plain and par- 
ticular answ^ers to the foregoing ques- 
tions, shall be reputed under scandal in- 
capable of admission to sealing ordi- 
nances, till they answer and give satisfac- 
tion as before appointed. 

''And the synod refer to the several 
sessions to proceed unto higher censure 
as they shall see cause, in the case of per- 
sons whom they ma}- find involved in the 
said oath with special aggravation, as 
taking or relapsing into the same, in op- 
position to w^arnings against doing so. 

''And the synod appoint, that each 01 
the sessions under their inspection shall 
have an extract of this act, to be inserted 
in their books, for executing the same ac- 
cordingly." 

—Action of tJic Associate Synod of Scot- 
land, Auo^nsl 25, 1757. 



178 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1907. 



MASONIC CORNERSTONE LAYING. 

The principles of the Pilgrims required 
obedience to whatever is .plainly taught 
or clearly iniplied in the ^^'ord of God. 
It is conceded that to the Pilgrims the 
greatest credit is due lor the exalted po- 
sition to wh'ch tliis nation has arisen. 
Their coming hei<" thr:e handred years 
ago "sJiapcd tJic (Icstiiiics of this coiifi- 
luiit. and thercfoic prolonndly affected 
the destiny of the zi'hole ivorld:'' 

There was a national movement in 
1870 to honor their memor}-, at the two 
hundred and fiftieth anniversary of their 
landing- at Plymouth. A thousand dele- 
gates gathered in convention at that time. 
And now, in 1907, by the erection of a 
monument, under the auspices of the 
Cape Cod Pilgrim Association, new hon- 
ors are offered the Pilgrim fathers, who 
rejected ritualism, vestments and pomp- 
ous titles, and were persecuted, impris- 
oned, and put to death for loyalty to the 
Word of God. 

As in 1870, so noA\- the 3,Iasonic order 
shamelessly intrudes itself into the cere- 
monies. What is their excuse? They 
have none. The Most Worshipful Grand 
Master of ]\Iasons, John T. Heard, de- 
clared in his address in 1870, that 'Tt is 
not known that any of the passengers of 
the Alayflower' were Free Masons. Cer- 
tainly no record of the fact has been 
discovered." Of course they were not; 
every principle held by them was opposed 
to IMasonry. Ex-President John Quincy 
Adams, after a thorough investigation of 
Masonry, said : 'T am prepared to com- 
plete the demonstrations before God and 
man. that the Masonic oath, obligations 
and penalties, cannot, by any possibility, 
be reconciled to the laws of morality, of 
Christianity, or of the land." The gov^- 
ernment of Free Masonry is despotism, 
not democracy. Dr. Xathanial Colver, 
ex-president of the Chicago University, 
said of Free Masonry that it is "Satan's 
masterpiece for the destruction of the 
souls of men." 

Dr. Edward Beecher declared that 
"By it Christ is dethroned and Satan 
exalted." These are true indictments. It 
is a far cry from such principles to those 
of the Pilgrims. 

]\Tasons are anxious to lav corner- 



stones, and build monuments to the Pil- 
grims, but wherever there are true de- 
scendants of the Pilgrims they will rise 
in protest against this dishonor of their 
principles. 



TRADE UNION AGAINST CIVIC UNION. 

It is said that trade unionists com- 
monly hold that strikes are proper in 
government occupations as elsewhere, so 
that clerks of a government department, 
for instance, or at least laborers on gov- 
ernment works may engage in organized 
striking- like laborers employed by cor- 
porations. What it is to hold up the 
public with "Your money or 3Aour life," 
was shown when the strike of employes 
of the public in the street cleaning de- 
partment of New York menaced" the 
iiietropolitan population with the peril of 
fatal epidemic. 

^ Any other department has tlie same 
rights as this one, and if one of these 
rights is a union hold up, then the police 
can strike in a period of threatened riot 
and leave the city to be looted by thugs ; 
the fire department can be called oft" by 
a walking delegate at the moment when 
a fire threatens, if neglected, to spread 
into a conflagration; the hospital force 
can be forbidden to work when a life 
hangs in the balance, the walking dele- 
gate instead of the surgeon can decide 
the question of a capital operation. 

It is safer to trust the population as a 
whole than to trust a limited self-inter- 
ested clique, or else the theory of popu- 
lar government is wrong. A trade union 
attempts to be an oligarchy, but as a 
nation we long ago decided against oli- 
garchical government. The case cited 
shows how it actually works when a 
cabal can threaten the lives of the chil- 
dren of a city or of a great section like 
a tenement district. 

The New York World used the strike 
of the drivers in the street cleanino- de- 
partment to show what it held to be a 
danger of municipal ow^nership in case 
such things were to happen, saying: 

"A very pretty object lesson in munici- 
pal ownership, is it not? Suppose the 
city of New York, in addition to. sweep- 
ing its own streets and removing* its 
own garbage, also owned and operated 



Oi-tober. T.Mi 



CllliiS'llAN CVNOSUKE. 



1T1> 



its own street cars, its own gas plant- 
and its own telephone system. Suppose 
all these public employes were organized 
—as they would be — after the manner of 
the drivers, and suppose these organiza- 
tions were affiliated — as they would be. 
What would be the situation? Xew York 
would be the abject slave of its hired 
servants. They could stop every car 
wheel as the drivers stopped every cart 
wheel. They could leave the city in 
darkness at night and in terror by day. 
They could make it all but impossible 
for one part of New York to communi- 
cate its needs and its calamities to an- 
other part. Tjiey could tie up the busi- 
ness, the industry, the activity of the 
metropolis, and hold the cit}- government 
in a state of siege.'' 

After all, there are two sides to the 
government ownership question as af- 
fected by strikes. A union which can 
tie up the cars of a street railroad cor- 
poration, might find itself running 
against different conditions, when it tried 
to stop cars owned by the public and 
run purely in public interest, with little 
or no profit to any one except the em- 
ployes so far as money is concerned, it 
is one thing to strike for a larger share 
in the financial proceeds of a corpora- 
tion, and another to suspend public utili- 
ties in order to compel the people to pa;>' 
larger car fares or water rates, or sub- 
mit to raising; a tax rate. The public 
will endure a great deal of inconvenience 
while the attack is also on the private 
owner's pocket : but the limit of patience 
is closer at hand w^hen the attack is both 
on public ■ convenience and the public 
pocket. 

A strike on a naval vessel would be 
mutiny. As individuals men have cer- 
tain rights as to ceasing work, and those 
rights can be obtained in an orderly man- 
ner, but the organized hold up, applied 
to government service, is a bandit's at- 
tack on the whole public, and intolerable. 
The people are the government, and to 
prostrate their appointed institutions 
even temporarily, is revolt and rebellion. 



SERVED THEM RIGHT. 

Ministers' Union Cast Out of the Trades 

and Labor Assembly. 

The trades' unions, as at present organ- 
ized, are contrary to the Declaration of 
Independence and to the Word of God 
(Ephesians 6: 5-9 J. 

The ministers of La Crosse, Wis., or- 
ganized as a union, and were admitted 
into the supreme labor body. The Brew- 
ers' Union brought charges against their 
brothers, the ^linisters' Union, that the 
latter were injuring the Brewery Work- 
ers' Union by agitating against the sa- 
loons. The Labor Assembly, after hear- 
ing the complaints, decided that the min- 
isters were injuring their fellow union- 
ists, and officiallv ca-t them out.' 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF EQUITY. 

A pastor in ^lontana writes for in tor- 
ma tion about the American Society of 
Equity. It was incorporated in Indiana 
in 1899. Its great object is said to be 
'"to obtain profitable prices for all prod- 
ucts of the farm, garden and orchard.'' 
Its membership fee is two dollars per 
year. One section of the By-Laws reads : 
'Tn case it should be considered desira- 
ble to hold an executive session, a door- 
keeper may be appointed, whose duty 
will be to admit no one except members, 
without the president's permission." 
^lembers are expected to extend frater- 
nal care to one another in sickness. Par- 
tisan and sectarian discussions in the 
meetings of the unions are prohibited. 



The things we have conquered will 
give us no trouble. The things we run 
from will meet us another day. 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF EQUITY. 
Secret Order Methods to the Surface. 

The Planters Association of Kentucky 
is seeking- to force unwilling farmers to 
join it under no less penalty than being 
forbidden to grow and harvest w-heat. 
To enforce its despotic demands no visi- 
tation of injury seems too low. Grain 
stacks and bins of threshed grain arc 
burned by night fiends. Threshing ma- 
cliines not owned by association men .ire 
in grave danger by the dastards. Last 
Thursday near Hopkinsville, Kentuckv, 
such a machine was* destroyed by dyna- 
mite that had been concealed in tho 
wheat on the farm of a Dr. \\'ood. '}>[r. 
Fields, the owner ot the machine, iiad 



ISO 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1907. 



been \varned to join the association. In 
Trig'g' County a farmer, Nathan HesLer, 
hac; deserted the association, and was 
taken from his home in the night by 
twenty-five masked men and nearly killed 
bv a merciless flogging- w^th a rawdiide. 
I.'rjions of such proclivities, or orders of 
an^- sort which would force accessions 
or retentions by threats of similar i-en- 
alties are barbarous and cowardly, arid 
no man of honor should abet their ig- 
noble existence. 
-■ChrisHan Conservator. 



DYNAMITE IN HIS WHEAT. 

Hopkinsville, Ky., July i8.— A thresh- 
ing miachine owned by John Fields, who 
is not a member of the Farmers' Asso- 
ciation, American Fociety of Equity, was 
destroyed this morning- at Oak Grove by 
dynamite concealed ni the wheat. Two 
labiicrs, John Garrett and James Brown, 
were mjured. Fields had been warned 
to jom the assoc^.ation before attempting 
t ) tliresh his wheal:. 

Tvventy-five masked men took Nathan 
Hester, a farmer, aged fifty, from his 
home at midnight and at the point of a 
shotgun flogged him with a rawhide and 
kicked him. 

His W'ife, w^ho has heart disease, faint- 
ed when she saw her husband dragged 
away and is in a critical condition. Hes- 
ter w^as a former member of the Farmers' 
Association, but deserted. 



"REFORMED HUNCHAKIST SOCIETY." 

Recently a copy of the constitution of 
the "Reformed Htuichakist Society" was 
found and turned over to the authorities. 
This society was recently introduced into 
this country from Europe. This has re- 
vealed many things of a truly astonishing 
nature. The fundamentals of the Hun- 
chakist laws is based upon a complete 
contempt for the laws of the United 
States. One section of the document 
provides for the assassination or ''execu- 
tion*' of whoever chances to avv^aken the 
disapproval of the society. The men in 
powxr have the privilege of condemning 
to death anyone. They are supreme, 
their followers recognizing no higher au- 
thority. 

There is not much choice betv/een alien 



assassins and home-grown ones. It was 
the Masonic organization of our own 
land that murdered Morgan, Noah 
Smith, Ariel Murdock, Job Hunt, David 
Brounlee and others. How much better 
than the Reformed Hunchakist lodge is 
the one under Cornelius Shea, which 
murdered many during the late team- 
sters' strike here in this city? We ought 
to have learned by this time that Dr. 
James McCosh, late president of Prince- 
ton, told the simple truth when he said: 
"Those wdio have been trained in secret 
societies have their sense of right and 
wrong so perverted that in the interests 
of the body wdth wdiich they have iden- 
tified themselves they will commit the 
most atrocious crimes." 



POLICE NOW HAVE FULL DETAILS. 

New York, Aug. 7, 1907. — Arthur 
Woods, fourth deputy police commission- 
er, has been in communication with Chief 
Watts of the Boston police, and has re- 
ceived considerable information regard- 
ing Shahinian, the reputed head of the 
Boston branch of the Hunchakists. 

According to the advices he received 
from Boston, the man's real name is not 
M. Shahinian, but Vagharsh Keoleyian 
He was a teacher in Varne, Bulgaria, 
prior to coming to this country six 
months ago as the representative of the 
Hunchakist party. 

It appears that his authority was ctues- 
tioned, and even tliat of the central 
committee which sent him here. There 
was a split in the Boston party, and the 
developments culminated in a fight for 
the possession of the Tzain Haireniatz, 
the semi-official Hunchakist organ. 

Shahinian reorganized affairs in Bos- 
ton. His system was termed a military 
one. The members were formed into 
companies of ten men each, the leader 
being called a ''dasnabed." The latter 
for an assistant had a lieutenant, w^ho 
transmitted the dasnabed's orders. 

A list of dasnabeds and their lieuten- 
ants was sent to Deputy Woods by Chief 
Watts of Boston. 

Boston seems likely to get its fill of 
the benefits of secret orders. 



To play all the timic is infinitely worse 
tijan to work all the time. 



October, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



181 



|letti0 of ©ur Por^, 



IMPORTANT. 

Grand Rapids, Mich., Sept. 24, 1907. 
Please let me, through the Cynosure, re- 
quest all who will to write a short letter 
expressing their view^s on Lodgery, as to 
its effect on church-life, home-life, busi- 
ness-life, or personal experience, and send 
it to me to be read at our next State Con- 
vention to be held in Flint some time in 
October. Send the letters as soon as pos- 
sible to H. A. Day, 35 Crosby street. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 



We received notice on the nth of Sep- 
tember that it was thought best for vari- 
ous reasons to postpone the Michigan 
State Convention to ''the middle of Oc- 
tober or later." No definite information 
had been received, up to the time of go- 
ing to press, as to the date decided upon. 



Preparations for conventions arc un- 
der way in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan 
and Iowa. There are "good hopes for 
a big convention at Des Moines, Iowa," 
writes President J. S. McGaw. The 
plans and programs are not far enough 
advanced to enable us to give more than 
the above general notice. 



The Board of Directors of the Nation- 
al Christian Association had an import- 
ant meeting on the i8th of September. It 
is interesting to look round the table and 
note the strong men \vho represent the 
Association in the interim between the 
Annual Meetings. The .denominations 
represented on the Board are the Luther- 
an, IMethodist Episcopal, United Presby- 
terian, Congregational, Reformed Pres- 
byterian, Evangelical, Free ^lethodist 
and Christian Reformed. Secretary J. 
M. Hitchcock also represents the Chicago 
Avenue (Moody) church (Independent). 
Plans for widening the work as well as 
continuino- it were wiselv undertaken. 



To sell one's birthright for a mess of 
pottage is bad; to sell one's soul for a 
glass of beer is worse. 



REV. G. A. PEGRAM'S REPORT. 

Grand Ledge, Mich., Sept; 19, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure : August 20th found me 
at Lake Odessa, Mich., assisting in a 
tent meeting held by Rev. W. S. Dean. 
Here I gave three Bible readings on the 
Difficulties of the Christian Life, which 
([uitc a luimbcr testified to be very help- 
ful to them in their Christian experi- 
ence. Brother Dean and his co-workers 
are loyal to principles of righteousness, 
and have no sympathy or fellowship with 
the Secret Empire. Brother G. G. John- 
son assisted me in scattering tracts al! 
over the town. Pie is a brother who is 
faithful to convictions. 

On the 25th I preached. twice at Grand 
Ledge ; once on Secrecy, which was well 
received. The Free Methodists are uni- 
versally loyal to anti-secret principles. 
Some denominations make concessions to 
lodges, but they never do. 

My next battle-ground was near Ro- 
meo, Mich. Brother R. R. Haight, a 
long-time friend, gave me right of way. 
He did more; he said "Amen." He is 
another loyal soldier of free speech and 
fair play. 

I gave four lectures here. The at- 
tendance was small, but the interest 
among those who did attend was great. 
Some loyal lodge people came. Bur our 
lecture was all they heard. I suppose the 
glare of Bible light dazzled the eyes ac- 
customed to the dark teachings of Se- 
cretism. Yet I heard of no opposition. I 
remained over Sabbath, and preaclied 
twice to hungry listeners. Everywhere I 
find a fev^ who are hungry for the whole 
gospel. One brother who had backslid- 
den because of Lodgeism promised to re- 
turn to the Lord, and live for Him. 

September 3d I went to Flint, Mich., 
to attend the Free Methodist Conference. 
The}' kindly gave me a few minutes to 
l)rescnt the cause of the National Chris- 
tian Association. Nearly every man, 
woman and child was furnished an anti- 
lodge tract. I found here a number of 
ardent readers of the Cynosure, and 
made many more. Some of them were 
members of several lodges. A few lodge- 
men are willing to rccci\c light. 

On Septemper 4th T preached to a 
crowded house of people who seemed to 



18: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1907, 



be hungry for the truth. \Mien the in- 
\itation was given, three or four seekers 
eame forward, for the fuU assurance of 
faith, and left seemingly satisfied. Oth- 
er brethren preached, too, and straiglit 
gospel sermons which won seeker-; and 
converts. 

After returning to Elkton, 1 went to 
Detroit to attend the Annual Confc'-ence 
of the ]\I. E. church. Among the ^ninis-- 
ters here I found a few loyal, faithful 
^ouls. struggling to clear -their con- 
sciences and yet avoid opposition. T toolc 
a few subscriptions for the Cynosure. 
Alost of them, however, will read neither 
books nor papers on lodges. 

Yours for truth, G. A. Pegram. 



AGENT DAVIDSON'S REPORT. 

Cairo, 111., Sept. 17, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure : I have been sick for 
the past two weeks, and Airs. Davidson 
for three weeks, but we are both greatly 
improved. 

I was unable to go to Washington, D. 
C, to the National Baptist Convention, 
although I had made every arrangement. 

I attended the Annual Conference of 
the Freewill Baptists at the Fifteenth 
street church, Cairo. Although I did not 
get opportunity to deliver an address I 
distributed a number of tracts and had 
private conversations with a number of 
pastors and laymen. I also attended the 
Forty-seventh Annual Session of the Old 
West Olive Missionary Baptist Associa- 
tion at Alt. Aloriah Baptist church, Cai- 
ro, Rev. J. H. Knowles, pastor. I was 
introduced and orave a short address. I 
also secured a few subscriptions and dis- 
tributed tracts. The Lodge has a 'Strong 
hold on practically all the ministers and 
delegates to these two associations. 

The Secret Lodge System, with the 
Saloon, dominate all things else here. 
We can hardly get out more than four 
or five to prayer-meetings or week-day 
services. The lodges call some of the 
people out every week-night, and also 
on Sunday. 

I shall be compelled, within the next 
sixty days, to.resign the active agency of 
the X. C. A., as the pastoral labors of the 
Nineteenth street Baptist church will fall 
heavily upon my shoulders. I would be 



very glad to see another agent appointed 
for Southern Blinois, Kentucky and Ten- 
nessee. In my opinion Mrs. Alice E.. 
Randle. a seceder, of Hammond, La., 
would make an excellent and worthy 
agent for Louisiana and Mississippi, and 
Mrs. Lena P. Bates, of Cairo, 111., would 
be an energetic agent for Tennessee, 
Kentucky and Southern Illinois. Mrs. J. 
C. Adams, of Lhiion City, Tenn., is an- 
other wide-awake and intelligent anti-se- 
cretist. I shall continue quietly to do an- 
ti-secrecy reform work. The fields are 
truly white to harvest, but laborers are 
few. Let us pray the Master for more 
laborers. 

At Union City Tenn. 

I was cordially invited here by that 
big. open-hearted Christian gentleman. 
Rev. Jesse P. Price, pastor of Beautiful 
Zion M. E. church, to deliver an address 
on "The Perplexing Problems of the 
Day." After the conclusion of my ad- 
dress I distributed tracts and received a 
number of subscriptions for the Cyno- 
sure. Dr. Price endorsed all I said, and 
admonished his people to be loyal to 
Christ and let the world take care of its 
own afi:'airs. 

Lhiion City is a town of 7,000 inhabi- 
tants, quite one-half negroes. Secret so- 
cieties here are legion. Dr. Price in- 
formed me that he and all the city pastors 
find it a difficult task to get even a few 
out to week-day church services. Rev. 
Wells, pastor of the Free Baptist church, 
and his wife, very kindly entertained me 
at their beautiful home. 

I hope soon to make a tour through 
Mississippi and Northern Louisiana, be- 
fore I resign the N. C. • A. work, and 
arouse the people, and discharge a few 
more gospel dynamite bombs (the Chris- 
tian Cynosure) among the churches. 
Francis Tames Davidson. 



TWO EXPERIENCES. 

A man, who seemed an earnest Chris- 
tian, came to liis pastor and said: "For 
eight years you have witnessed against 
the lodge. For eight years I have strug- 
gled against my conscience, which all the 
time said : ' The pastor is right. ' But 
now I can stand it no longer. I surrender 
to God." 



October, 1907, 



CIIUISTIAN CYNOSUKK. 



183 



Coming on the train from Wlieaton, 
June 13, 1907, I sat in the car opposite 
lodge members returning from annual 
meeting. Their drunken rowdyism and 
coarse jest annoyed me, but imagine my 
surprise to see next day in the dailies 
the picture of the roughest man in the; 
crowd as one of the highest officers of 
the lodge, just elected. Keflect ! 

Chicago. B. E. B. 



IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 
Secretary Stoddard Works Around Home. 

3118 14th St., N. W., Washington, D. 

C, Sept. 17, '07. 

Dear Cynosure — I have heard of the 
person who was so much engaged in 
looking after his neighbors! affairs that 
he had no time for his own. For some 
years my time has been so occupied in 
the States as to leave little for the dis- 
trict. My efforts during the past few 
weeks have been at bome. Secret soci- 
eties are numerous and popular here as 
elsewhere, and their baneful eft'ects are 
the same. Just now over several of the 
saloons may be seen, "Yea — Welcome, 
Eagles — Yea." The saloon people evi- 
dently know their own. Whether the 
''Yea" is the cry made by the "Eagle" 
when drunk, or some other cry, may be 
one of the mysteries. 

When I last wrote I was en route for 
Northfield, Mass. At 'The Wheaton" I 
found many friends, and the usual ef- 
forts were in progress to enlig-hten those 
coming from the four quarters of the 
globe. In addition to the chart-talks and 
the general distribution of tracts, the 
"free-tract box," by the road, was kept 
supplied. Those driving past, as well as 
those on foot, would stop to secure 
tracts, sometimes leaving them further 
down the road. ]\Iany conversations 
showed "The Wheaton" to be a marked 
cottage and the New England agent a 
noted man. 

It was my privilege to get some of 
the closing blessings of the great con- 
ference,, and to attend a meeting of the 
United Presbyterian presbytery of New 
York. Dr. James Parker, of Jersey 
City, gave the report on reforms. Those 
who anticipated an able report were not 
disappointed. The Lodge Evil was not 



omitted, as it often is ])y tliosc less cour- 
ageous, but was pointed out as one of 
the great hindrances to the spread uf the 
gospel. 

En route to tbis city I visited several 
towns north of riiiladelphia that were 
easily reacbed l)y the ever-enlarging trol- 
ley system, i missed no one more than 
Rev. \\'i]]iam Andcr.., for years the hrst 
pastor of the Scliwcnkf elders. In his 
home and in his church your agent has 
always been welcome. He had a large 
heart, and a kind expression that always 
cheered. His call to the eternal home 
came suddenly. The church did not be- 
gin to hold the large circle of friends 
bereaved by his departure. 

Eriends were cheerful in .rencwing 
their subscriptions for the Cynosure and 
new names were added to our list. 

In Washington for two Sabbaths I 
have supplied the pulpit of the Brethren 
church, i^xltich personal work has been 
done in this and other congregations 
here. I am glad to note the absence of 
emblems from the persons of some who 
formerly wore them, and to see the 
growing evidence that the truth is hav- 
ing its effect in their lives. On last 
fifth and first days I worshiped with the 
Friends, formerly called "Quakers." 
These meetings were helpful. The N. C. 
A. truth is needed among this people. 
Hut few have followed the lodge ways of 
darkness here, but there is constant dan- 
ger. The great title and the gaudy dis- 
play is not always avoided for the plain 
path of duty. 

During the past week there has been a 
verv large gathering <.)f colored Baptists. 
It was estimated that there were at least 
5.000 present to hear the address of 
Jjooker T. W^ashington. Our old friend. 
Rev. R. N. Countee, introduced me to 
some of the leaders, whom he said were 
somewhat in sympath\- with the N. C. A. 
Some tracts were given out.. ]\[}- supplv 
did not allow a large distribution. These 
people arc making great advances and 
are to be commended for their zeal. 

I am expecting to address a district 
synod of the Ohio Lutheran friends 
gathering here to-morrow. Both in Bal- 
timore and \\'ashington church doors are 
open for our work. I expect to report 



1S4 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1901 



new victories later. I was glad to find 
our enthusiastic friend, Carry A. Na- 
tion, with her hatchet sharp for an at- 
tack on the lodsre. W. B. Stoddard. 



FROM ARKANSAS. 
Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter . 

Humphrey. Ark.. Sept. i6. 1907. 

This is to let you know I am still 
fighting- the lodge "billy goat."' One of 
the big preachers said in the Sunday 
School convention week before last, that 
'*'the missionary we have on this field 
is an old secret order woman, and she is 
going around showing up our secrets." 
When I heard what he said I was -at 
Pastoria, Ark. I had an appointment 
there on the eighth of this month. In 
making my talk on missions and wom- 
an's work the Holy Spirit brought up 
the lodge. I took out all my books and 
laid them on the table, and then asked 
the lodge brethren ^vhether they ever 
took a woman into their lodges. They 
said "Xo." I said I did not think anv 
woman in the world would let a lot of 
preachers, and deacons, and class-lead- 
ers, and presiding elders, and gamblers, 
and drunkards, divest her of her cloth- 
ing and put a seagrass rope around her 
neck and a hoodwink over her eyes, and 
lead her up to a man and bow her on -her 
knee, and have her swear to have her 
throat cut from ear to ear. The broth- 
ers laughed and said: "Xo, Sister 
Woods, we never make a woman a Ma- 
son." I said: 'T know who made me; 
God made me. And He did not put a 
hoodwink on me, either." 

After I showed those books at Pasto- 
ria, Ark., the Xoble Grand went around 
trying to get men to join for two dollars 
and a half. A sinner Oddfellow told me 
that he did not want any of those secret 
order men to pray for him. He said: 
''We all drink together. They rented 
our hall for a saloon, and the women 
all met over that saloon, while the men 
were downstairs drinking. These lodges 
are ruining our women. Some of the 
lodge-members are women that don't 
care for themselves, and they are all 
mixed up with our best women. Most 
of the men say they are Christians, but 



they will pray upstairs in the lodge and 
come down and drink all the whiskev 
they can get." 

I will tell you about an experience I 
had at Brinkley, Ark., some time ago : 

A yoimg doctor came to see my books. 
He looked at all I liad and then said: 
"Madam, I would advise you to quit 
handling this literature. The men who 
are writing up these secrets are in Chi- 
cago : the lodgemen can't get to them to 
kill them; but if you handle their books 
you will be killed. Some one will shoot 
you down on the streets of Brinkley, and 
neither the white people nor the black 
people will say a word against it, for we 
all are secret order men." 

When that doctor went out my sister 
took me in her arms and cried until she 
made me cry, but I could not go back on 
Jesus. I said : ''J^sus, you died for me, 
now I will die for your cause. I am not 
afraid to die." 

After the doctor had gone, came a 
Royal Arch Mason to see my books. He 
looked them over and said that they 
(meaning his lodge brethren) had writ- 
ten to headquarters to see what could be 
done about my selling these books. I 
said, "What did your Grand Master 
say?" He started to show me the letter, 
then he put it back in his pocket and 
said, "Your sister and I are good friends. 
I hate to tell you what the Master says 
in this letter. We don't want to hurt 
you." I said, "He must have told you to 
kill me." He said, "Well, yes, something 
like that. You know Masons rule this 
government, and when they say anything 
they must be heard." I said, "Jesus 
Christ is against your order, and you say 
you are a Christian. Why do you want 
to kill me?" He said, "We are like the 
Anarchists ; what we are told to do, 
whether we like it or not, we must obey 
orders." I said, "The more you tell me, 
the more determined I am to let the peo- 
ple know what these secret orders are." 
Well, I am at Humphrey to-day. They 
said if I came back here they would 
lynch me. I lectured to them last night, 
and thank God, I am not dead, but writ- 
ing to you this morning. 

Yours for the service, 

(Mrs.) Lizzie Woods. 



October, IDf: 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



185 



ELDER, QIT OFF'R DAT GOAT. 

BY S. S. BUTTLEE, EDWAKDS, MISS. 

Hole on dar, Elder, you got dat thing wrong. 
Yon can't cram dat kln'er stuff down my 
tiiroat ; 

Dars no place in de Bible dat justifies 
A preacher ridin' a goat. 

You dun almost quit preacbin' de gospel for 
good, 
An' leff de ole Bible to moat, 
An' am got your heart an' head bote hxed 
On a stink in' ole "Lodge Billy Goat." 

Fum North to South, fum East to West, 
De same cussed thing is afloat; 

De preacher is pinchin' an' squeezin' folkes 
ban's. 
To see ef deys ben ridin' de goat. 

You can't find a town in de ole Bayou St^ite. 

Nur a village dats uv any note. 
Whar de preacher ain't loudes' in preacbin" 
to men 

Salvation thru de "Lodge Billy Goat." 

You ain't gf)t time to fool wid de lodge, 

De gospel is all you kin teat 
An' ef you gwinter preach it lack Jesus sed 
do, 

Ye'll bafrer git off'r dat goat. 

Paul nebber said ur thing "bout a lodge 

In none ob de letters he rote. 
Neither did Peter nur James nur John — 

Dey all got 'long 'dout de goat. 

Now look'r he;"e, bud, dis thing is too plain. 
You preachers is in de wrong boat. 
An' 'stead uv your cargo being made up uv 
sheep. 
Bless Gaud, you're invaded wid goat. 

You're takin' enbody in your lodge nower- 
days, 
Fum gambler to de ole whiskey bloat. 
An' you're mixed up together so bad in de 
lodge, 
Till you can't tell de shee^) fum de goat. 

You're gallantin' eroun' fmn piller to post. 

Wid a leetle ole pin stuck in your coat : 
An' 'stid ur lecturin' fur Christ an' de 
church. 

You're out fur de "Lodge an" de Goat." 

You're tellin' de fokes dat the church is ded 
broke, 

While de lodge is as fat as a shoat. 
An' dat de safes' place to "vess money now. 

Is in keer uv de "Lodge an" de Goat," 



You say de reason dat you jined the lodge, 
Kase de church didn't give you s'pote, 

But you furgit you taught de fokes to rob 
God, 
An' feed all de dough to de goat. 

Well huccum de lodge kin cut sich a dash. 

Wharever its banner do float, 
An' buck in' de church to pay off her debts, 

While you gib all de cash to de goat? 

Huccum you won't change your tactir-s er- 
whilo, 
An' your time to de gospel devote. 
An' see ef you don't git as much wool off 
de ram, 
As you do off de "Lodge Billy Goat." 

You done got so bole Avid your debblish lodge 
wuck, 
Tel you's tryin' to control de church vote. 
And when dars a 'lection you hope to win 
out 
Thru de grip an' de sign uv de goat. 

Now. bud, lemme tel ye. ye better call a 
hault. 
Kase dis matter is no enec-dote. 
An" ef you stay in dat lodge tel Jesus conies 
back. 
Ye'll wish ye had ur got off dat goat. 
— The Baptist Vanguard. 



OHIO AGENT'S REPORT. 

Leonardsburg, Ohio,, Sept. 17, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure : This month's work 
opened with a five days' stay at Greers- 
ville, Ohio, where the Central Ohio Wes- 
leyan Methodist Conference was in ses- 
sion. Here I found no lack of anti-secret 
sentiment. Nearly every elder, and many 
of the lay members, subscribed for the 
Cynosure. Anti-secret resolutions were 
passed, and a very interesting and profit- 
able open discussion of the lodge question 
was held. If these ministers carry home 
to their various charges the anti-secret 
zeal manifested in the Conference, we 
may hope to see a great work done. 

From Greersville I Avent to ^Mansfield, 
which is indeed well styled "a great se- 
cret-order city." Masonic pastors are 
not uncommon, and the hand of the riot- 
er has not always been kept off preach- 
ers who dared to denounce the Christless 
secret empire. 

However, God has established and pro- 
tected at least one great bulwark for His 



ISO 



CHUISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October. lOOl 



Cause. In the person of Rev. S. P. Long, 
pastor of the First English Lutheran 
church, the largest society in the city, we 
have a splendid example of the true 
moral courage in the face of a po\\'erful 
enemy. I have before me a printed copy 
of an anti-secret sernnon which he 
preached <ome time ago to about i.Soo 
people, under such circumstances as to 
make ]^Ir. Long stand in niv estimation 
as a real hero. I wish everv one might 
read this sermon. 

The encoiu'aging part of this incident 
is that this faithful pastor did not lose 
his pastorate for his faithful teaching, as 
a prominent daily paper predicted he 
would. If we all would trust God and 
march straight into the promised land, we 
would save }-ears of fatal wandering. God 
is not dead. 

During my stay in ]\Iansfield I did not 
lack entertainment. Among A\'esleyan 
frien.ds and others I received most royal 
treatment. I placed the Cynosure in a 
ntimber of homes, and I hope the seed 
sown may bear fruit in time to come. 

At the Dunkirk camp-meeting I foimd 
most of the workers quite anti-secret .in 
sentiment, but the neighborhood is well 
represented in lodge circles. Just pre- 
vious to my arrival on the grounds Evan.- 
■srelist F. DeAA>ard, of Trov, Ohio, threw 
an anti-secret bomb into the midst of an 
audience largely made up of ^Masons and 
other lodge men. Certain ones told me 
that they had never heard such a handling 
of the subject before. One of the towns- 
men related that he had overheard one 
lodge man saying to another : "You had 
better been coon hunting than listening 
to that man preach on secret societies.'^ 
He added: "Some one will get him some 
day." 

Owing to the fact that the lodge ques- 
tion had been so ably discussed, and that 
the camp-meeting was just at the climax 
in its soul-saving efitorts,, I was unable 
to get an opportuunity to speak. How- 
ever. I did considerable personal work. 
and received many "God bless you's." but 
not much of that material encouragement 
which is so essential to the carrying on 
of any work. 

While walking about the grounds I met 
an old veteran of the Civil War. who re- 



lated an experience, m substance some- 
thing like this: "I with my own hands 
once helped catch the captain of a 
bushwhacker band, which had been try- 
mg to shoot us all. A\'e brought him to 
the officer of our regiment, who was a 
^lason. The bushwhacker gave the Ma- 
sonic sign of distress. The officer re- 
sponded by deliberately setting free this 
deadlv enemy." 

The emotion in this honest old vet- 
eran's voice showed that he realized the 
magnitude of such an oitense against the 
best interests of our cotmtry. A Httle 
careful investigation of Masonry and its 
oiTspring today would probably reveal 
offenses against society quite as con- 
temptible and dangerous as the one re- 
lated of Civil War days. 

H}- work for several days past has been 
mostly in the rural districts centering 
around my home. Recently, while pass- 
ing through the Alum Creek Quaker set- 
tlement. I was given an opportunity to 
give a short talk before those assembled 
at the regular Thursday meeting. I en- 
joyed the kind hospitality of their minis- 
ter, Isaac Stratton. arranged for a lec- 
ture, and secured subscriptions for the 
Cynosure from several of the people. 

A day's canvass among- friends on the 
Fargo AA'esleyan charge resulted in five 
subscriptions for the Cynosure and a 
pleasant visit through a neighborhood, 
where I spent five years of mv earlv 
childhood. 'H. R. Smith. Ir. 



FROM WOODBURN, ORE. 

Mr. S. E. Roth writes: 'T remember 
your request to let you know of the 
Lodge work and the work against t.he 
Lodge in this community. Years ago I 
felt like opposing the Lodge Evil, and 
did so in words and by a few small 1:ra:':s 
\vhich I then possessed, but I did not 
know of the Christian Cynosure. My 
efforts were not altogether fruitless, yet 
I did not accomplish great things. I re- 
member talking Avith a gentleman, a 
irember of the 'M. E. Church, who was 
a lodgeman, but is said to have left the 
Lodge since. I also reasoned with a 
neighbor, since removed to another lo- 
cality, who was a lodgeman. I met him 
not lone aeo, and he said, 'God bless 



Oetolter. lOdT. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUKE. 



181 



your work.' I had been sending him 
some of our X. C. A. tracts. Xow these 
things are encouraging, though but tri- 
fles. My means have been so limited 
that Icould not do but little.. I will 
close, wishing the L'^nosure and our 
mission God's blessing." 



world, to overthrow tlie kinfrdom of 
Satan. Very truly yours. 

( Re\'. ) Charles E. Temple. 



A GREAT WORK. 

Pikeville. Ky. 

Greetings in the name of Jesus. 

Well, glory to God for victory through 
His dear and ])recious name. U'e had 
street meeting last Thursday evening, 
Jiily 18, 1907. About 300 to TOO people 
were present, and the lodge question was 
agitated very nmeli. Several of the 
I saints were out. and God had right of 
way, and the tire fell and put several 
lodge people under conviction, who wept 
aloud and said that they belong to sev- 
eral secret societies. I never experienced 
I ■ such a meeting in all my life. The whole 
town is in an uproar and the devil is 
stirred. God is opening the eyes of sev- 
eral, and the saints are looking up, trust- 
ing and expecting great victory. It pays 
to mind God and stick to the truth, re- 
gardless of men or devils. 

The lodge people have tried co have us 
arrested, or said that we ought to be ar- 
rested: that we were disturbing the 'peo- 
ple. The police jndge came in where I 
am working 'and said that the lodge 
l^eople had been talking like they were 
being disturbed, but said he. 'AYlien 
they come to me for a warrant they will 
hear from me."' He is not a lodge man. 

Well, glory to God. He is getting hold 
of people in our town and lodge people 
are coming to me and saying they are 
not going to have any more to do with 
the lodge. Yours respectfully, 

A. b. Cline. 



Broekwayville, Pa. 
Find one dollar for a continuation of 
my subscription. I am 81 years old and 
must have the Cynosure for the rest of 
my life. I am trusting in God for the 
triumph of truth and the overthrow of 
lodges: and am looking for the coming 
of the Kingdom of the Lord Jesus. M\' 
faitli looks u]i to Him. who rules the 



torn ®ur fecbattge0» 



"I challenge any one to point to a 
single lodge in Illinois or anywhere that 
has as a lodge tid^en action in a fight 
aiiainst the saloon in local option or pro- 
hi])ition campai.un. The churches have 
to press that W')rk. Vour lodges, as such, 
are of no force on the temperance ques- 
tion. I never saw. or heard of a lodge 
entering into a fight in a campaign 
against saloons." 
— From editorial in T'nclc Sdui. Marissa. 111. 



NOT TO EXCLUDE LIQUOR MEN. 

Odd Fellows Vote Down Constitutional 

Amendment. 

St. Paul, Sept. ly. — The Sovereign 
Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows at its first 
business session overwhelmingly defeated 
the constitutional amendment excluding 
wholesale liquor dealers from member- 
ship in the order. Retail liquor dealers 
have been barred from membership for 
ten vears. 

The proposal to reduce the age of eli- 
gibilitv to membership from 2i to i8 
years was also defeated. 

Denver, Col., was selected as the place 
of meeting next year. Gen. ]^Ianley A. 
Raney, of Iowa, was re-elected Com- 
manding General of the Patriarchs ]\Iili- 
tant, and he is the first oflicer of that rank 
to wear the new insignia of his office, 
voted bv the Grand Lodge. This jewel 
will consist of a bar and medallion of 
solid gold studded with eight diamonds, 
and valued at ip500. 

At a meeting of the (^rand Secretaries' 
Association, J. AA'. A\'ilkerson, of ^lis- 
souri, was elected President, and C. C. 
Lyman, of Ohio, Secretary-Treasurer. 
The retiring President is J. P. King, of 
Ontario, Canada. — Ba/fimoj-c Sim. Sept. 
1 8, 1907. 



DRINKING IN LODGE. 

Emporia. Kan.. Aug. 5, \y)Oj. — Dr. C. 
I". Sinclair, president of the local lodge 
of tlie Fraternal Order <n' Fairies, v/as 



ISS 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1901 



arrested this morning and gave bond for 
his appearance in poHce court. 

Citv Attorney J. Harvey Fritz says his 
arrest was made because the lodge was 
ciiarged with maintaining a nuisance 
vriiere people were allowed to congregate 
for the purpose of drinking intoxicating 
liquors and that any otlier member of the 
lodge could l^je arrested as well as Sin- 
clair. 

The law provides for both fine and im- 
prisonment. 

All sorts of rumors are on the streets. 
One is to the effect that the Eagles will 
fight to a finish, and wall have the aid 
of the entire order in the union. The 
city expects to get out a permanent in- 
junction against the lodge keepino- any 
kind of intoxicants on the prenuses. 
Many people heretofore supposed to be 
members of the order now claim they 
are not members. 
— Mih^'aiikcc Free F^rcss. 



A PERSONAL EXPERIENCE. 

Having been reared hi the United 
Presbyterian church, where I was thor- 
oughly instructed regarding the evils of 
Lodgery, I found on entering the public 
ministry, which I did in 1895, that this 
was not an illusion, but a real, live, well 
entrenched giant wTong against, the 
Church of Jesus Christ. While pastor of 
the Presbyterian church of Bisbee, N. 
D., the horns and hoofs of the Masonic 
order w^ere in evidence to thwart justice 
in the courts. The tw'O druggists of the 
town were, according to court records, 
violating the law by seUing intoxicating 
liquors to person in the habit of becom- 
ing intoxicated. The penalty for such 
violation w^as fifty dollars fine and I be- 
lieve some ninety days in jail for each 
offense. The wives of these druggists 
were signing petitions for their husbands 
to sell the stuff, and at the sanae time 
were teaching Sunday School classes in 
our church. I requu'ed them to either 
withdraw their names from the ])etitions 
or cease teaching. They refused the for- 
mer and I demanded the latter. A mob 
of eight men came to do me bodily in- 
jury, but tliey Avere cowards and God 
turned them from their purpose ; but 



they threatened to burn us out and burn 
the church and to tar and feather me. 
Then approaches w^ere made to buy me 
out, but I w'as not for sale. In the mean- 
time the liquor question was pushed and 
resulted in three warrants being served 
on each druggist to answ^er in the dis- 
trict court. One of the men who had 
bought liquor had threatened to shoot 
his wdfe and hired W'Onian, and another 
lost job after job on account of drunken- 
ness. The cases were notorious. The 
day of trial came, and after repeated ef- 
forts by prominent business men to per- 
suade me to withdraw the cases, the 
county attorney attempted to so persuade 
me, but I told him there was the case and 
he knew his duty. Only one count on 
one man w-as brought up, and to an ob- 
server I was the one on trial. Witnesses 
w^ere brought in who swore they knew . 
me to be a liar, and the attorney for the 
defense used all kinds of unlawful insinu- 
ations to belittle me, at wdiich time the 
glory of the Lord seemed to be about me 
and a hallelujah all but escaped my lips. 
The jury were out but a few minutes, 
and rendered a verdict of "not o^uiltv."' 
An awful travesty on justice ! The county 
attorney then made a motion to dismiss 
the rest of the counts and the other 
men had no trial at all. The newspapers 
were in some way silenced, so that no 
public utterances through their columns 
could be made. The druggist was a 
Mason, the county attorney was a Mason, 
the jury picked out w^ere Masons, and 
many of their friends in the town and 
country were IMasons, who aided in 
throwing the wdiole blame on the preach- 
er, to shield their own guilty lawlessness 
and perjury. There were Masons also ni 
our Presbytery, who took up the wail 
about the preacher, and using their in- 
fluence caused him to be laughed to scorn 
and belittled in their sessions. If they 
could have brought charges they would 
have done so, but they could not because 
he stood square on the laws both of liis 
church and the land. I spoke publicly 
there against the lodges and they would 
have killed me if the}' had dared. 

Such was a little of niy experience 
with this subterranean svstem, the truth 



October, 1901 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



180 



as to which the Eternal Word declares 
shall be proclaimed upon the housetops. 

H. P. Gray.' 
Pastor Presbyterian Church. Aulmrn, la. 
Sept. 12, 1907. 



REGAINING POWER IN ITALY. 

Jesuits Have Masonic Army and Navy 

Officers Under Suspicion. 

Paris, July 7. — ("Special.) — Slowly, al- 
most imperceptibly, the seed has ripened 
which Pope Pius and his advisers in the 
Vatican have sown. Nothing more is 
left of the era of the frank and open 
Pope Leo, who like the Popes of the re- 
Ti^dssance fought the "barbarians" and 
■"usurpers" with open visor. 

INIerry del Val and the other Cardinals 
who follow him are now sure of their 
pC'Wer, and Crispi and Zanardelli. the 
two great enemies of the church, are now 
where Mazzini and Garibaldi are. 

One cannot but admire the masterly- 
tactics of the Jesuits, whose puppet the 
present Pope really is. While France 
slipped away and while there is sonic 
sign of revolt among- German Catholics, 
incredible though that sounds, Italy is 
completely gathered into the Papal fold, 
and that to such an extent that every 
officer in the Italian army and navy who 
is a Free Mason is under suspicion, and 
is being closely watched. 

Rather a strange thing at a time whc^,\ 
thousands of ^officers in the strictest dis- 
ciplined army in the world, the German, 
iire Free Masons, and while two German 
Kaisers have been grand masters of the 
Older. 

The Free ]\Iasons of Italy, how':vef. 
are preparing to go direct to King Mcior 
Erranual with a protest, and then there 
will be lively doings in. that kingdom. — 
Portland Oregonian. 



CARRY NATION TO MASONS. 
A Letter to Masons Individually. 

■ What I have written in this issue and 
what I will write hereafter, may cause 
some of you to feel bitter toward me. 
This will be wrong. I will be a blessing 
to you. I shall smash those yokes and 
set you captives free. I do not condemn 
you as men but as Masons. There arc 
noble, good men drawn into this devil's 
net. Yon are innocent victims. There is 



not a true man that would ever enter into 
this bondage of crime if he knew what he 
was going into. Like a man stealer, the 
trap caught you and secured you by the 
most fearful compact ever known out of 
hell, and this menace is held over yon 
that if you violate your oath as a Mason 
you are forever barred from the conti- 
dence of your fellow man. This is as 
false as the rest. Just listen. Suppose 
twent}' men should bind themselves wil- 
lingly and knowingly into a compact to 
murder all the male children in Xew 
York, one of the number repents and 
confesses, the nineteen do not. V»'hich 
would be the better man? This is not a 
fair illustration for vou never knowingly 
lx)und yourself, vou were innocent and 
were trapped in an unlawful conspiracy. 
Xow which is the nobler, to continue in 
this covenant with death, this agree- 
ment with hell, and this refuge of lies, or 
to repent and confess ? God gives you 
the conditions of pardon, "Let the wick- 
ed forsake his way and the unrighteous 
man his thoughts, and let him return im- 
to the Lord and He will have mercy, and 
to our God and He will abundantly par- 
don." Carry A. Xation is to you a \o\- 
ing mother who would warn you. I know- 
there are true men in the ^lasonic bodv 
that will not allow those unlawful oaths 
to compel them to lose every principle of 
true manhood. There are thousands more 
who do not attend the meetings, have not 
for years, and will never again. A Bap- 
tist minister after my lecture at Grant 
Cit}-, Mo., saia, 'T have been a thirtv- 
second degree ^lason, but when I became 
a Christian I had to leave the lodge." I 
would be glad to have letters from others 
who know of the terrible condemnation 
that ]\Iasonrv is bringing on humanity, 
to warn men of this. X'o heathen idola- 
ter or infidel is more lost to salvation. 1 
am a missionary sent to you. 

Your loving missionary and mother. 
Carry A. Xation. 
— The Hatchet, \\'ashington. D. C Sept.. 
n)07. 



HOW CAN TWO WALK TOGETHER? 

It is very clear that two cannot walk 
together where they are not agxeed. This 
was demonstrated recently in La Crosse, 



1!X> 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 11)07, 



^^'isconsin. where the ministers, in order 
to cnrry favor with the labor unions 
formed themselves into a union and were 
admitted to the federation of the union 
organizations, but later, upon the protest 
of the brewers' imion, who claimed that 
the ministers' union was working against 
them, the ministers' union was rejected. 
Several other things were also demon- 
strated by this incident : First, that there 
is a deep seated unitv of all secret socie- 
ties, otherwise the brewers' union w^ould 
not liave expected favor from the min- 
isters' union. Second, the attempt of 
ministers to get by wrong means whai; 
can only be sectired bv right means, and 
what is of value only when thus secured, 
shows that following God is the way to 
gain and keep the confidence of laboring 
men and all other sensible men. Third, 
it is also demonstrated that if ministers 
of the gospel would spend as much time 
finding what is the will of God with an 
unsliakable determination to do it, as 
they do trying to invent some way of 
their own much greater good would re- 
sult. — Wcslcyan Mcilwdisf. 



HIGH SCHOOL FRATERNITIES. 
Testimony to Their Baneful Effects. 

(Marion Melius in Review of Reviews.) 
A really serious problem in our edu- 
cational system which threatens to en- 
danger not only the future of our schools, 
but also to afifect adversely the spirit of 
American democracy by emphasizing 
class feeling, has been presented to the 
American parent by the establishment 
and development of the high-school fra- 
ternity. The sittiation is just this: Some 
thirteen or fourteen years ago there 
sprung up in the high schools of this 
country secret societies patterned after 
the college and university fraternities. 
The inspiration for these came partly 
from a desire for more social life in the 
school, and partly from principals who 
had found their own college societies a 
distinct benefit. The high school frater- 
nities were quickly followed by sororities, 
and these organizations thrived harm- 
lessly for a while. They were generally 
>illy, but they were innocuous. As they 
increased in numbers and were strength- 
cnerl bv a chapter s\stem all over the 



countr}', they became a more and more 
powerful influence, until to-day they are 
the dominating element in the schools, 
and any challenge of their supremacy is 
accompanied by a threatened overturning 
of all school discipline. To-day educa- 
tors are practically united in regarding- 
the high school secret society as an ele- 
phant on their hands, and they are ex- 
tremely anxious to rid themselves of it. 
How, is the question teachers, parents, 
and even lawyers are asking themselves. 

The three main charges on which the 
high school secret society is arraigned 
are (i) that it is undemocratic ; (2) that 
it resorts to cheap politics, and (3) that 
it is independent of school control The 
national educational association investi- 
gated the matter and from the results of 
the investigation saw fit at a meeting in 
1905 to resolve ag-ainst such societies, 
"because they are subversive to the prin- 
ciples of democracy which should pre- 
vail in public schools ; because they are 
selfish and tend to narrow the minds and 
sympathies of the pupils ; because they 
stir up strife and contention ; because 
they are snobbish ; because they dissipate 
energy and proper ambition ; because 
they set up wrong- standards ; because re- 
wards are not based on merit, but on fra- 
ternity vows ; because they inculcate a 
feeling of self-sufificiency among the 
members ; because secondary school boys 
are too young for club life ; because they 
are expensive and foster habits of extrav- 
agance ; because they bring politics into 
the legitimate organization of the school ; 
because they detract interest from study 
and because all legitimate elements for 
good — social, moral and intellectual — 
which these societies claim to possess can 
better be supplied to the pupils through 
the school at large in the form of literary 
societies and clubs, under the sanction 
and supervision of the faculties." 

The attitude of high school principals 
in general may be arrived at from the an- 
swers to a set of 185 letters sent- out all 
over the country, asking an expression 
of opinion on the high school fraternity 
question. Out of the 185, only three 
spoke in favor of fraternities ; fifty-three 
expressed no positive opinion, but were 
inclined to look on them with disfavor ; 



():-t()l)er. T.Mi' 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



101 



one said they would do no harm if prop- 
erly managed, and 128 spoke against 
them in nnquahfied terms. The denun- 
ciation of them by sonie principals is 
most stern and severe. The principal of 
the high school at Albany, N. Y., in- 
cludes the statements of many others in 
his sweeping assertion : "The high school 
secret societies are thoroughly pernicious 
in their influence. I am unable to dis- 
cover one redeeming feature connected 
with them, while their demoralizing- in- 
fluence is constant and thoroughly evi- 
dent." Others thougiitfully and unhesi- 
tatingly put down such statements as : 
''They are apt to degenerate into smok- 
ing and gambling clubs on the part of the 
boys, and frivolous, gossipy, idle places 
on the part of the g-irls ;'' "they are not 
maintained for the purpose of cultivating 
the nobler sideof young men. or devel- 
oping in them pure thoughts :" "they 
quicklv become social clubs where are 
cultivated the worst tastes and practices 
between young people ;" ''the members 
do unmanly deeds as a body in secret that 
not one would think of doing openlv." 



from ®ur Hail. 



I know the Lodge system is a great 
evil and is robbing men and women of 
that peace and joy in the Holy Ghost. I 
once belonged to a lodge, but when God 
took hold of me He showed me that I 
could not belong to the lodge and to Him, 
too. Yours in His service, 

Rev. D. \\'. Brehm. 



Pickering, ^io. 
Enclosed find stamps for which please 
send tracts on Odd Fellow^ship. [ want 
those which give quotations from lodge 
rulings forbidding the use of the name 
of Christ in lodge prayers. The tract I 
want is entitled "Oddfellowship a Relig- 
ious Institution." I find that tract prove> 
an eye-opener to many people. Sincere- 
ly yours, (Rev') Otto J. P3ulfin. 



are crippled b\- the sixteen lodges in this 
town of 1,200 inhabitants. Some of our 
own young people are in continual temp- 
tation from the Lodge Evil, and I, with 
my Consistory, have decided to do some- 
thing to counteract it. We need some 
literature. The Grange is the lodge 
which we have to fight especiall}'. The 
]:)eople of my church are nearly all farm- 
ers, and as the Grange is a farmers' lodge 
more than others, we need especially lit- 
erature to point out the dangers of this 
lodge. Please send me some in that line. 
Yours in Christian fraternity, 

P. J. Hoekenga. 
Pastor Christian Reformed Church. 



Arkansas. 
I was m company with Sister Eliza- 
beth \\'oods yesterday, Sunday, Sept. i, 
and she told me that you are prepared to 
give information regarding ^Masonry, 
Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows, etc., 
and can furnish expositions of the above- 
named orders. Also that you can give 
reasons wh\- you can expose these or- 
ders. Xow, I am a Christian and desire 
to go the right way and would not like 
to be misled. Having been an order 
member for fifteen. years, I am very anx- 
ious to know if 1 have been misled all 
that time. If I have, I am ready to pull 
down and stop right now. I have been 
taught that to expose any of these secret 
organizations meant death to the one who 
did it. If you will send me literature re- 
garding this matter, I shall be satisfied. 
Please ans\ver at once and oblige, 

A. Seeker (name signed). 



Lynden, Wash. 
I arrived in Lynden eight weeks ago, 
and have noticed more and more every 
dav how three of the four churches here 



Tomberlins, Ark. 
I met Mrs. Lizzie Woods, of Pine 
Blult, Ark., who is doing a great mis- 
sionary work, and is causing the church 
to wake up by handing out tracts. I am 
awake, so please send me a sample copy 
of the Christian Cynosure, and also some 
tracts, if you will, for I am pastor ot two 
churches : and if there is anything else 
that you have in liand that will help save 
our people, I would be glad to receive 
it. Sister Woods is a great W(Mnan and 
is doing good work for the Master. 
Your friend, 

( Rev. I Win. l^dward. 



102 CHKIS'FIAN CYNOi>UKE. October, 1907. 

STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 
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CONTENTS. 



An American Triumvir — Thurlow Weed.. 193 
The I. W. W.— How the West Dealt with 

One Labor Union 195 

Nobles of the Mystic Shrine '. 196 

Modern Brotherhood of America 196 

President Charles A. Blanchard — Por- 
trait 197 

President Blanchard's Letter 198 

Elks Ran Too Fast .203 

Petty Practices of Lodges 203 

Smaller Liquor Men Barred .203 

Scripture Selections 204 

Masonic Theology 205 

An Ethical Code for Lawyers 206 

Church and Ancient Mysteries .206 

Ghouls att Amherst Steal Gravestone 207 

News of Our Work 208 

Agent Pegram's Work 208 

W. B. Stoddard's Letter 209 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter .210 

From Ohio's State Agent ... 211 

From Brother Davidson 212 

The Lodge Put to Flight 212 

Obituary — J. Constant Woodward 213 

Seceder's Testimony — John E. Hill "Made 

Free Indeed" 214 

From Our Mail 214 

From Rev. C. B. Ward, Missionary in In- 
dia 214 



The Only Most Worshipful Master 215 

Influence of Lodgism in the Churches 215 

An Ordinary Antimasonic Experience. .. .216 

Letter to a Masonic "D. D." 218 

National Association of Manufacturers to 

Combat Unionism 219 

The Great Serpent Has Many Victims- 
Initiations Into the Military Order 220 

The "Anti-Frat" Movement 220 

Root Out the Fraternities 221 

Knights Templar Observe Ascension Day. 221 
Four Members of the Black Hand Cap- 
tured 222 

Some Black Hand Convictions 222 

Testimonies of Evangelists 223 

Advertisements 224 



COLLEGE SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Their custom, character, and eflforts for theif 
suppression. By H. L. Kellogg. Containing 
the opinion of many college presidents, and 
others, and a full acount of the murder of Mor- 
timer Leggett 25 cents each. 



Folly, Expense and Danger 

Secret Societies. 



By CHARLES A. BLANCHARD, President 
of Wheaton College. 

They may be rudely classified as religious; 
c. g., the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfellow^ 
ship, the Knights of Pythias, etc.: political, as 
the Know-nothings, Knights of the Golden 
Circle, the Order of American Deputies, th^ 
Kuklux-Klan, the White League, etc.: indus- 
trial; as the unions of carpenters, bricklayers, 
conductors, engineers, etc.: insurance; as the 
Royal Arcanum, the Modern Woodmen, tht 
/)rder of the Iron Hall, the Ancient Order of 
United Mechanics, etc.: and the social; as the 
college fraternities. Postpaid 5 cents each. 

THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 

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Entered at the Post Office, Chicago, Hi., a* 

second class mattf 





"Jesus answered him,— 1 spake openly to the world; aad in secret have I said nothing." John I8:L'0. 



VOLUME XL. 



CHICAGO, NOVEMBER, 190^ 



NUMBER 7 



AN AMERICAN TRIUMVIR. 

November fifteenth is the one hundred 
and tenth anniversary of the birth of 
one of the most famous and influential 




HON. THURLOW WEED, 

STATESMAN AND JOURNALIST. 

American citizens, who were active in 
pohtical affairs before the civil war. At 
ten years of age, one hundred years ago 
this year, he was a Hudson River cabin- 
boy. That year, the first steamboat that 
ever did business as a regular public 
conveyance, Fulton's Clermont, was 
placed on the Hudson River. 

At twelve years of age, he began to 
work in a printing office at Catskill, the 
county town of his native county; and, 
when he was twenty-one years old, he 
established, at Norwich, the Agricultur- 
ist. During the next ten years he edited 
several papers, including the Anti- 
Masonic Inquirer^ published in Roches- 
ter in 1826 and 1827. 

In 1830, he founded the Albany' 



Evening Journal, from which he with- 
drew in 1862. He settled in New York 
City in 1865, where he was for some 
time editor of the Commercial Adver- 
tiser, but retired from active and regu- 
lar journahsm in 1868, half a century 
after establishing his first newspaper. 

He was now seventy-one years old, 
possessed of matured influence and 
ripened experience, and he rendered 
notable service to the politics of the 
country. Over his signature, articles 
continued to appear in political journals. 

He was twice elected to the New York 
assembly (1826-1830). 

He had much to do with the election 
of De Witt Clinton, the Erie Canal gov- 
ernor of New York; the election of Gov. 
William H. Seward, who was afterward 
Lincoln's Secretary of State ; the nom- 
ination of the first President Harrison 
in 1836, and his re-nomination and elec- 
tion in 1840. He actively promoted the 
nomination of Gen. Taylor for Presi- 
dent, in 1848, and of Gen. Scott in 1852. 
In 1856, he used his influence for Sew- 
ard, but cordially supported Fremont,whb 
was nominated ; and, in i860, followed 
the same course respecting Seward and 
Lincoln. 

He was a member of the noted tri- 
umvirate, consisting of Seward, Weed 
and Greeley ; and was frequently spoken 
of as the Warwick of his party. He 
was esteemed the most adroit of party 
managers, was an original leader of the 
Whig party, and exerted tremendous 
influence on legislation and executive 
appointments ; yet declined, for himself, 
any public office. To this rule — or pos- 
sibly before its confirmation — his two 
terms in the Assembly seem to liave been 
an exception. 



VM 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1007. 



He was a volunteer soldier, serving 
on the northern frontier of New York, 
in the war of 1812, and had the rank 
of quartermaster-sergeant. He was ac- 
tively opposed to the Albany Regency of 
the Jackson administration, and to Cal- 
houn's nullification policy. At the re- 
quest of President Lincoln, he went to 
Europe in November, 1861 ; where he 
remained until June. 1862, rendering' 
valuable service to the American Union, 
through his influence with leading Eng- 
lish statesmen. Throughout the eight 
years' administration of President Grant 
he ^^*as a strong force in the counsels 
of the Republican party, and, at its end, 
an important factor in the crisis that 
was met when Hayes was elected. 

Alormonism, which took its rise in 
Manchester, N. Y., was well known, as 
to its origin, by ]\lr. Weed ; and Free- 
masonry, also, became fully known, in 
the same state, after his newspaper ca- 
reer had begun. Pie was familiar with 
^e Alasonic execution of Captain ]\Ior- 
gan, and with the full exposure of the 
system, the crime, and the criminals. It 
was a time of violence, of which the 
death of the most celebrated victim was 
a salient feature and exponent. It was 
also a time of almost unrestrained men- 
dacity ; and it was only by summoning 
Masons, and putting them in peril of 
punishment for perjury, that some of 
the important disclosures were obtained. 
From that time. Masonry ceased to be 
a secret order, in the complete sense, 
even though where it was not aban- 
doned — it continued to sit with closed 
doors ; and few, if any, knew the devel- 
opments of the time better than this edi- 
tor and politician. It was to Thurlow 
Weed that one of the confessions was 
made, by a repentant participant in the 
execution of Captain Morgan ; and, for 
thirty yeairs, the secret was kept 'as 
faithfully as it would have been by any 
Royal Arch Mason, although the one 
who communicated it, earnestly desired 
to have the truth made known whenever 
his death should occur. 

The methods employed by Freemas- 
onry in connection with occurrences fol- 
lowing the murder, are, in part, typified 
by an episode in the life of Mr. Weed, 



in which originated the saying, "A good 
enough ]\Iorgan." Omitting details lead- 
ing to a question, which related to a 
body, beheved, on good evidence, to be 
that of the murdered man, and which 
allowed the questioner to assume that it 
was that of another person ; we quote 
part of the account given by Mr. Weed 
himself, and sworn before a notary pub- 
lic of New York City, in the year 1882. 
October 16, 1827, he went in the even- 
ing to the billiard-room of the Eagle 
Hotel in Rochester, to see a friend from 
Clarkson. 

"When leaving the room, Ebenezer 
Grifiin, Esq., a prominent lawyer em- 
ployed as counsel for Masons, who was 
playing billiards, turned to me, cue in 
hand, saying: 'Well, Weed, what will 
you do for a Morgan now?' To which 
I replied : 'That is a good enough Mor- 
gan for us, till you bring back the one 
you carried off.' 

"On the following morning, the Daily 
Advertiser, a Masonic organ, contained 
a paragraph charging me with having 
boastingly said that the body in ques- 
tion 'was a good enough Morgan until 
after the election.' 

"That perversion went the rounds of 
the Masonic and Democratic press, 
awakening much popular indignation, 
and subjecting me to denunciations, in 
speeches and resolutions, at political 
meetings and conventions. Explanations 
were disregarded ; the maxim that 
'Falsehood will travel miles, while Truth 
is drawing on its boots,' was then veri- 
fied. 

"I suff'ered obloquy and reproach 
from that wicked perversion, for nearly 
half a cenutry. Indeed, there is reason 
to believe, that, even now, where I am 
personally unknown, generations are 
growing up, believing that I mutilated a 
dead body for political effect, and, when 
exposed, boasted that it was a good 
enough Morgan till after election. 

"Forty years afterwards, the editor of 
the paper, who originated that calumny, 
by a series of pecuniary reverses was 
compelled to apply to me for assistance. 
I avenged the great wrong he had done 
me, by obtaining for him a situation in 
the Custom House." • • 



November, 11307. 



CIIKISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



105 



I. w. w. 

How the West Dealt with One Labor 
Union. 

Lindley C. Branson, a young editor, 
arrived from Nome when the "union" 
was in full flower of its dominion, 
feared and deferred to by all classes, and 
started two newspapers, the Tonopah 
Sun and the Goldfield Sun. He had 
successfully edited several mining camp 
dailies in Alaska. He is a quiet, force- 
ful young man, who does things with- 
out any bluster. There are few men to- 
day who know so thoroughly the psy- 
chology of a mining camp. 

Several wrecks after he began to get 
out his papers Joseph Smith, the walk- 
ing delegate of the I. W. W., called on 
him and told him that his printers, press- 
men, devils and whoever else he employ- 
ed would have to join the "union." 
Branson said he would look into it. He 
did. Smith came back expecting a cring- 
ing submission to his "polite command." 
He was staggered when the editor said 
to him : "My men will not join the I. 
W. W. They do not believe in the Debs 
hash of socialism and anarchy. Already 
they are members of the American Fed- 
eration. I will have something to say 
about your organization in a few days." 
The walking delegate retorted that re- 
quests to join the union were never dis- 
obeyed by prudent men. Prudent men 
were those who wished to remain in the 
desert and not be buried there. His 
storm of threats subsided very suddenly 
when the young editor drew from his 
jacket pocket two short barrelled 44's 
and spread them unostentatiously but 
significantly on the top of his desk. Exit 
the walking delegate. 

The organization had power enough 
then to persuade every merchant, 
tradesman, broker, wildcatter, and even 
many mine operators to refuse any ad- 
vertisements to his paper. Even the 
newsboys, messenger boys, bank clerks, 
brokers! clerks, shop clerks, stenograph- 
ers, young and old of every employment, 
were members of the I. W. W. then. 
It was commonly said that they became 
members through "the fear of God" es- 
tablished by the "union." The miners 
were in the same plight, though they 



feebly proclaimed that they had a union 
of their own distinct from the I. W. W. 
and a local of. the Western Federation 
of Miners. 

This "fear of God" Branson proved 
a miserable superstition that foundered 
utterly when a man of initiative and un- 
common pluck challenged it. He demon- 
strated that the bad men and desperate 
characters of the "union" were contemp- 
tible cravens, and he branded them 
in his headlines as "Gurs," "Scoundrels," 
"Assassins," "Cheap Skates," "Low- 
browed Thugs," "Gowards," and 
"Sneaking Murderers." That he found 
men with the courage to set the type 
was considered as remarkable as his own 
dauntless front. 

When it came to the disciplining of 
a man who could shoot with both hands 
without taking them out of his pockets 
or apparently moving a muscle the I. 
W. W. leaders were revealed in their 
true light. One attempt was made to kill 
him and only one. He sought out the 
man who had shot at him from behind 
a shed and made him go down on .his 
knees to him in front of the L W. W\ 
headquarters and beg for mercy. Doz- 
ens of "workers" looked on in sullen 
silence. 

By this time Branson had the backing 
of such noted gun-fighters as George 
Wingfield and Diamond-field Jack Da- 
vis. These two millionaire mine ow^ners 
had volunteered their services as his 
newsboys. They distributed his boy- 
cotted papers in a spectacular fashion, 
spitting them on the long barrels of 44- 
calibre revolvers and taking them from 
the shotted files to hand to purchasers. 
No "worker" had the temerity to dis- 
turb these newsboys. 

Then Branson, Wingfield, Davis and 
United States Senator George S. Nixon 
organized their protective association 
and declared a counter boycott upon the 
boycotting union. The hundreds of 
miners who had been bullied into join- 
ing the outlaw union were notified that 
the mines would thereafter be closed to 
L W. W. men. When the miners re- 
fused to do this the mines were closed 
and finally they were starved out of the 
Debs organization. 



196 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1907. 



Leaders of the American Federation 
-of Labor were brought to the camp, who 
under the protection of the Mine Own- 
ers' and Business Men's Protective As- 
sociation, organized the separate trades 
out of the L W. W., until at last there 
were no "workers" left who had any 
distinctive calling recognized by the 
American Federation. — Barton W. Cur- 
rie, in Harper's Weekly. 



NOBLES OF THE MYSTIC SHRINE. 

The letter which appears below, fur- 
nished to the Chicago Daily News by 
the well-known Chicago publisher, Mr. 
Ezra A. Cook, was returned with the fol- 
lowing brief note : 

''The Daily News, appreciating your 
courtesy and thanking you for your in- 
terest, regrets that it does not find i-he 
inclosed communication available for 
publication." 

Chicago, Sept. 28, 1907. 
Editor ''Chicago Dailv News," Chicago, 
111. : 

Dear Sir — We have just witnessed 
with both eyes and ears a fairly good 
imitation of the annual "blow-out" of our 
boys which occurs on the evening of De- 
-cember 31st. True, there were a few 
extras in the way of elephants and ani- 
mals. But this is an age of progress, 
and we may expect our boys to out-do 
this great splurge, as they have three 
months' time in which to prepare for it. 
I do not believe, however, that any of 
them will be so anxious to take part in 
B, procession as to hang onto a rope as 
we are told 1,142 of these performers did 
•on Friday night. Nor do I think they 
will draw so largely from our police and 
■fire departments as this afifair did, at 
the expense of the dear public. Fifty 
mounted policemen, two platoons of the 
police on foot, and fourteen firemen on 
foot, whose salaries are paid from the 
taxes of property owners, is the record 
we find in the public press. It is a com- 
fort to know that "last night's ceremonies 
hold the record for spectacular arrange^ 
ments," for it seems true that it was the 
"worst ever." 

Nothing in the secret society line ap- 
proaches the vulgarity displayed in the 
ritual of the Order of the Mystic Shrine. 



Judge Burt, of Detroit, a Mason, boast- 
ing the possession of 138 Masonic de- 
grees, ninety-six of which (the Rite of 
Memphis, or Egyptian Rite) he sold in 
sections, said when he furnished the full 
ritual of the Mystic Shrine a few years 
ago for publication, that he received these 
Shrine degrees direct from the founder, 
Florence the actor, and as he took no 
oath to conceal them he was at liberty 
to give them publicity. The reason he 
gave me for this publication was the de- 
grading obscenity of the ceremonies of 
the order. Scores of members of the 
order have admitted to me the vileness of 
the ceremonies of the Mystic Shrine. 
Has this reputation for vileness secured 
for the Shrine the popular furor wit- 
nessed Friday evening? Does Imperial 
Potentate Frank C. Roundy, President 
of the Roundy Regalia Company, find 
such blow-outs profitable? Did he spend 
much money for the display, or did his 
host of admirers furnish the money? 
These are questions that a public whose 
curiosity the order evidently intended to 
excite by the display of Friday night, 
would like to have answered. 

. . . Ezra A. Cook. 



MODERN BROTHERHOOD OF AMERICA 

The M. B. of A. is a secret, fraternal 
insurance order, with home office at Ma- 
son City, Iowa. Its organ is "Modern 
Brotherhood" and is published in Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa, monthly. T. B. Hanley, 
Des Moines, Iowa, is Supreme Presi- 
dent : E. L. Balz, Mason City, Iowa, is 
Supreme Secretary, and Mrs. Almira 
Jenkins, Cottage Grove, Oregon, is Su- 
preme Chaplain. The usual lodge social 
life is characteristic of this one. Hope, 
No. 317, Kansas City, Mo., reports that: 
"After every lodge meeting, a dancing 
program is rendered, free to all M. B. 
A. members and visitors, and this ar- 
rangement will be permanently con- 
tinued." , 



A half-loaf is better than no loaf pro- 
vided the half-loaf is not injurious. 



We should not forget when life goes 
well that the days of adversity will come. 



November, 1007. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 




PRESIDENT CHARLES A. BLANCHARD. 



19S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1907. 



PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 

Dear Fathers and Brothers: 

At the last meeting of our Board of 
Directors I said to them that we ought 
to begin the new year with a more earn- 
est and effective plan for work than we 
had last year. In the number of meet- 
ings held and results accomplislied I do 
not feel that we did all in our power, 
and I trust that w'e shall find our minds 
aroused by the great need and evident 
willingness of God to bless our efforts. 

Some years ago a minister declined a 
certain Christian service, which he was 
called upon to do, on the ground that 
the appeal therefor was too pessinustic. 
He thought that the kingdom of God 
was advancing rapidly, and that instead 
of calls to prayer and fasting there 
should be an appeal for thanksgiving 
and praises. At that time the mayor of 
the city in wdiich he lived was a common 
drunkard and frequented brothels kept by 
colored people. It was my opinion then, 
and it is my opinion now, that the age 
is evil, that Satan has great power, that 
we are in the time of apostasy. But' I 
also believe that the earthquakes, and 
n-ars, and rumors of wars, and general 
demoralization of our time, foretoken the 
coming of our Savior. So while I sor- 
row for many things I see, I am not dis- 
heartened by them all. Jesus told us that 
in days like these we should lift up our 
heads, ''because your redemption draweth 
nigh" (Luke 21 128). 

I am minded to give you this month a 
detailed statement of a fact which recent- 
ly came under my own observation, and 
which is important, not only in itself, 
but because It Is typical. I was in a 
beautiful little city which is favored 
above many others in the religious priv^- 
i leges which It enjoys. I have in that 
city some very dear friends who feel 
that we are unnecessarily agitated by 



secret societies. They think that what- 
ever evils there may be connected with 
them are few and unimportant ; that it is 
not necessary to say anything about 
tliem; that through the preaching the 
gospel all forms of evil, one by one, vvill 
disappear, and the kingdom of God thus 
will come. They are entirely sincere in 
this opinion. I do not think that they 
are consciously influenced by the fact that 
they can thus avoid the hatred of ihe 
world and prosper financially, wdiich 
would not be so if a clear declaration 
of the truth regarding these organiza- 
tions were made. They may feel these 
dangers, but I do not think that then* 
position is consciously determined by 
them. 

Being in this beautiful city, surrounded 
by these godly men and women, one 
would almost think that the mlllenlum 
Ivd'l begun. Coming to the home of a 
friend at noon-time one day, I found him 
deeply agitated, and shortly heard the 
following story, which I repeat to you : 

In his home at this time there were 
living, temporarily, a mother and son. 
The latter was a handsome boy of twelve 
or fourteen. When he spoke to you he 
looked straight at. you, and his clear blue 
eyes seemed to admit you to a pure and 
lovely soul. This morning the boy had 
been invited to go on a berrying expedi- 
tion, and having been by the same lads 
previously invited to such an outing, he 
obtained permission and went. Three 
boys of about his own age, one of them 
stronger and older than himself, were In 
the party which had Invited him our. 
When they had gotten away from home 
so far that no one could see or hear, the 
three boys lay hold upon this lad, stripped 
him entirely naked, and tied his hands 
behind his back. Then they put green 
apples in fresh cow manure and told him 
to kneel down and pick them out with 



November, irXH. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



199 



his teeth. When he refused, they lashed 
him with a rope, pounded him with their 
fists, and pelted him with the apples un- 
til he did as he was directed. They were 
initiating him into the "Black Hand So- 
ciety," and required him to swear that 
he would never tell what he had done. 
IJe refused to do this, and they again 
lashed, pounded and pelted him. The 
big boy proposed to bury him, but the 
otlier two refused to participate in this 
outrage. Finally they permitted him to 
put on his clothes and go home. All the 
\v'av alonor- thev followed him, and threat- 
ened him if he should reveal what th(-;y 
had done, and struck him from time to 
time to awaken his fears. He came home 
to bis mother, and they followed him to 
the very door, and struck him a last blow 
jusc as he entered the door. His mouth 
was bleeding, his body was covered w4th 
welts and bruises. 

Let us now examine this transaction 
a little, and see whether or not it throvrs 
any light on this question, whether or 
not Christian men in this day are under 
obligation to bear testimony against 
secret societies. First, I call your at- 
tention to the fact that this whole jui- 
rage was in accordance with the customs 
of lodges which have been practiced for 
years. I think you all know that secret 
societies carry out their rituals in dif- 
ferent ways. \\'here lodgemen are gen- 
tlemen, indecencies and absurdities c'.re 
slurred, so that the grossness of their 
immorality and cruelty may not be per- 
ceived. But where the lodgemen are 
ignorant, uncultured, brutal men, the 
same ceremonies are performed in sucli 
a way as to endanger life and be abso- 
lutely . horrible from the standpoint of 
decency. Any reader who has seen the 
Oriental Degree conferred upon Masons, 
Oddfellows, Knights of Pythias, etc., will 
understand what I mean. This is a de- 



gree entirely apart from the ritual of 
any established secret order. It ./as 
made up by rude men for the purpose of 
enjoying the effect which it would ha\'e 
upon those who received it. If I should 
\\rite in this letter plainly what is in- 
\'ulved in that degree, it would not be 
proper to send out this number of the 
Cynosure through the mail. 

iNien have been maimed, killed or craz- 
ed by these lodges for years. One of my 
most vivid recollections of my \-outh is 
the sight of a dwarf, who ran behind the 
fire company. When a boy he was un- 
usually brilliant and intelligent.' \'ery 
early he entered one of the oldest and 
most famous of our colleges. A gang ot 
cowards took him out of his room c-:e 
night and held him under the pump, and 
"i)umped him," as they called it — that is, 
deluged him with cold water. The rc- 
:^ult was that his physical development 
stopped, and his mind was ruined. He 
came back to his parents an idiot, per- 
fectly harmless, and was thus taken care 
of until he died. This sort of thing ha*, 
bee: done over and again. 

The effort of lodges in initiating is to 
terrify and to humiliate. They wish to 
biiid men to themselves by fear and 
sliame. This explains a large portion of 
the rituals of the Masons, the Oddfel- 
lows, the Knights of P_\-thias. the col- 
lege fraternities, etc., etc. \Mien lodge- 
men get drunk or excited, of course 
tilings happen which they deeply regret 
when they are sober or in cold blood. 
The cure for these evils is in the aboli- 
tion of the organizations, or in such a 
change in them as to avoid this danger. 

It is obvious that such transactions, 
occurring in lodges composed of men, 
n^turall}- pass down to lodges composed 
of }oung men, and finally become, as in 
this instance, the property of mere boys. 
lite bovs think that these transactions 



200 



CUKl^riAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1907. 



are manly. \A^hy should they not think 
them permissible, knowing as they do 
that their fathers and brothers are doing 
such things? Why should they not, if 
thev can. have the same kind of sport 
^vhich their fathers and brothers enjoy? 
These three boys who got the one lad 
cut v\-here they could strip, lash, pelt and 
pound him without danger of interrup- 
tion, lied repeatedly in order to get him 
there. They proposed expeditions in the 
^vav of cross-country runs, berrying, etc. 
Li this- respect, as in the character of 
their abuse, they were copying the work 
of their elders. Satan is the god of 
secrecy, and he is a liar from the begin- 
ning, as Jesus said (Jno. 8:44). I think 
it IS safe to say that no decent man ever 
joined a secret society who was not 'ied 
to in order to secure his initiation. Lies 
about the membership, lies about the pur- 
pose, lies about the obligations, lies about 
the ceremonies. 

Rev. Dr. Ayedelot, of Cincinnati, w^as 
at one time talking with a prominent min- 
is' e^ of that city, who was also a prom- 
inent IMason. This minister is not novv 
m the church. The last time I knev/ 
what he was doing, he w^as reported to 
be living on the wages of harlots. He 
was a fine looking man, had a brilliant 
mmd, wore his hair down on his shoul- 
ders, and was attractive to a certain class 
of women. For a while, as was stated, 
he was a pastor. V.diile he was yet in 
the pulp'it, he said at one time to Dr. 
A}"edelot. "Doctor, what is the matter 
\vith Freemasonry?" Dr. Ayedelot re- 
plied, "The matter with Freemasonry is, 
it is a lie all over." 

This is a true statement, and it is true 
of other lodges as well. Masons often 
sa\' to me, "Of course there are bad men 
in lodges, just as there are in the 
churches." They always put that in, 
"Just as there are in the churches." But 



tlie difference is, that the church makes 
i;icn who heed its teachings, whole, while 
the lodges corrupt and destroy even 
worthy men who come in contact with 
them. I once heard a seceding member 
of the Masonic lodge say that he had 
ahvays prided himself on being a truth- 
Fiil man, but when he became a Free- 
mason he lied even to his wife, and that 
over and over again, in order to deceive 
her respecting his lodge relations and 
movements. 

As these boys took off a neighbor boy,. 
who had done them no harm, in order to 
stripy pound and pelt him, why should 
they not lie about it ? The lying was in 
\V) respect worse than the other things 
which they did. These miniature lodge- 
men are liars from the very necessity of 
L"i:eir work. If they had told this boy 
tlie truth, he w^ould not have put him- 
self ill their power. Just so as to most 
of the men w^ho will join the Freemasons,. 
Oddfellows, Knights of Pythias, Wood- 
n^en. Workmen, etc., this year ; they 
would not unite with these orders if 
they knew all the facts about them. 

Some of the boys who belong to tlie 
higi; school fraternities in Chicago are 
seeking to avoid, the difficulties of their 
position. They have been trying to se- 
cure a modification or a lenient admin- 
i.-tation of the rule of the Board of 
Education against them. They are like 
all other secret society people ; they want 
the advantages of society, while they ..\re 
traitors to it. They wish to represent 
their high schools in the athletic contests, 
oratorical contests, etc.. and at the same 
time thev are not willing to take their 
chances with their fellows on their 
merits, but wish to belong to a frater- 
nitv so that they may be pushed and 
pulled in one way or another into posi- 
tions of prominence. And after they 
h.ave secured these positions by these un- 



jS^ovember, 1907, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



201 



ilerhanded methods, then they wish to 
extend the influence of their secret so- 
ciety by teUing the new students that 
the brightest men, the best men, the most 
popular men in school, belong to secret 
societies. 

It is reported by one of the members 
of the Board of Education that he said 
to one of the secret society boys, "li you 
do away with your secrecy, the board 
will not object to your fraternities." I 
am not free to say that it is the secrecy 
of the whole lodge movement which 
makes it obnoxious. It is the fact that 
Freemasonry is secret, which enables it 
10 do its dark and evil deeds. An open 
orj^-anization could not perform the cere- 
monies or administer the oaths of Free- 
masonry. It would perish from among 
men. Albert G. Mackey, of Charleston, 
S. Carolina, one of the most eminent 
Masons of our country, said this him- 
self. He said, "U our work should be 
done openly, Freemasonry would not last 
as many years as it has centuries." Free- 
masonry is now nearly two hundred years 
old. Mackey's statement is correct. If 
Masons should undertake to do their 
work publicly, the order would not last 
tvvo years. It can manipulate elections, 
secure promotion of bad men to high sta- 
tions, deliver criminals from just punish- 
ment, secretly, but if it should try to do 
these things openly, it would fail and 
become a public laughing-stock. 

Secrecy is the badge of sin and crime. 
It always has been, it always will ht. 
Frankness and openness are the mark of 
integrity ; always have been, always must 
be. ^ 

Let us now pass for a moment to ^he 
first thought suggested in this letter. Is 
it the duty of Christian men to say, on 
proper occasions, in a public way, that 
lliese orq-anizations which train boys to 



do such things as are above narrated, 
are evil, or not? 

One of the most popular exercises al 
these meetings where objections are 
made as to the evil effect of lodges, is 
lo speak of drunkards, of their conver- 
sion, the wonderful v. ay in which these 
]:>oor victims are made new by the gospel. 
This continually occurs. I think this 
'^hould have a proper place in the teach- 
ing.'- of these meetings. Drunkenness is 
one of the greatest crimes, but lodges 
protect the business of drunkard-making. 
Their conclaves and social assemblies are 
often great debauches, continuing foi 
days. 

One of the brightest boys I ever taught 
came to our town on the verge of de- 
lirium. He was made a drunkard In a 
college fraternity, and was helped to 
continue a drunkard by association with 
the Woodmen. He left the college to go 
to the capital of a neighboring State, 
where a minister who had befriended 
him was carrying on a gospel meeting. 
On the street of that city he met an offi- 
cial of the Woodmen, who was attending 
a general meeting of that town. In a 
little while he was crazy drunk, and the 
v/ork of that preacher through months, 
for that fellow, was undone in an hour 
by that lodge man. 

Vvhat is the reason that it is proper 
— even their duty — for Christians to talk 
about the sin of drunkenness, and the 
virtue of saving drunkards, while it is 
so unnecessary to say anything about the 
lodc^e^ which make the drunkards and 
protect the business of drunkard-mak- 
ing? 

There was in my office within the last 
twentv days a gentleman who is a pro- 
fessor in a university, where one of my 
friends who objects to preaching about 
secret societies, graduated. He told me 



202 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November. 1907. 



that he hmisclf had seen, in a meeting oi 
secret society people in that university. 
men so drunk that the}- were vomiting- 
all over the floor. He said it was a sick- 
ening sight. 

\\'e]l and good, let us try to save these 
lodge-made drimkards. and then let us 
tell it to the glory of God. But what is 
the reason that we should not tell of the 
lodges which have made them what they 
are? 

There is one explanation of tliis 
strange phenomena: Satan has no objec- 
tion to the saving of drunkards. Saloon 
men have no objection. Distillers, brew- 
ers and corrupt politicians have no ob- 
jection. Xo man ever yet earned the 
hatred of the world by saving a drunk- 
ard. A drunkard is no recommendation 
to the liquor business : he is a disgrace 
to it. If Christian people would spend 
their time and money in making him a 
sober man,, the liquor business would be 
delighted. They want him to continue 
buying liquor and continue to drink in 
moderation, and thus they keep on cor- 
rupting voung men and making drunk- 
ards of them. A boy. passing a liquor 



hop 



where a drunkard lav at the door, 



ran inside and said to the saloonkeeper, 
''^Mister, mister, come out here; your 
sign has fallen down.'' This kind of a 
sign does not help the liquor dealer, and 
if Christian people will help to pick up 
the sign, while they refrain from, med- 
dling- with his business, he will be con- 
tent. God will be pleased with the kind- 
ly action, but He may at the same time 
say, ''Cursed be he that doeth the work 
of the Lord deceitfully, and cursed be lie 
that keepeth back his sword from blood"' 
(Ter. 48:10). 

"Thy throne. O God, is for ever and 
ever: a sceptre of righteousness, the 
sceptre of Thy kingdom. Thou hast lov- 
ed righteousness and hated iniquity; 
therefore God. even thv God. hath an- 



ointed Thee with the oil of gladness 
above Thy fellows'" ('Heb. 1:8-9). 
The Tews did not crucify Jesus Christ 
because He loved righteousness : they 
crucified Him because He hated iniquity.. 
If He would have allowed the priests 
and Pharisees to go on deceiving ^he 
people without any objection, they would 
never have put Him to death. But He 
liated iniquity, and He allowed men to 
know- that He hated it, and He required 
His followers to hate it. That was the 
reason they hung Him up between the 
thieves. 

May we be graciouslv kept from the 
foil}- of supposing that we may innocent- 
1\- keep silence while such things go for- 
ward. Other men have boys as well as 
me father of that boy whom I told of. 
There are other mothers besides his. And 
if we keep silence while the sons and 
daughters of our neighbors are put to 
shame and ruined in body' and soul, we 
may be sure that the curse will come 
back in due time upon our own homes. 

It is duty to preach the ^^'ord of God. 
A\'e are all of us more or less thorough- 
1}- informed about it. But it is also our 
dut} to warn men. A\'e ought to save 
some men with fear. Xo Christian man 
is better than his Lord. X'o Christian 
man ought to desire to be treated bettei 
by the world than Jesus Christ was. If 
Vv e love the world, its praise, its glory, 
the love of the Father is not in us. 

May God help us to be faithful in this 
dc.}\ to preach the gospel, to preach tiie 
Word of God : to preach the gospel nou 
am.ply for drunkards, but for lodgemen,. 
for corrupt politicians, for timeservers 
and ease-lovers. In other words, let us 
preach the Word, the whole Word, and 
let us beware of keeping back the truth 
that our age needs. 

Sincerely and fraternally yours, 

Charles A. Blanchard, 



November. l^Xi 



CHPaSTlAN CYNOSURE. 



203 



ELKS RAN TOO FAST. 

A party of seven Eiks returning from 
a ciub house in ^lanitou, where a social 
session in honor of visiting Elks had 
been attended, drove at terrific speed on 
their way home. At Colorado Springs 
the automobile struck a telegraph pole. 
Three men were killed, and another soon 
died. 



PETTY PRACTICES OF LODGES. 

During the sessions of the Grand 
Lodge of Elks at Philadelphia, in July 
last, it was decided to establish a flag 
day for Elks on June 14. A resolution 
was adopted calling for tiie appointment 
of a commission to devise ways and 
means to prosecute outside users of the 
Elks' emblems. 

No Negroes Need Apply. 

The ^lemphis lodge was authorized to 
prosecute the negro Elks of that city. 

In this connection a resolution was 
passed reprimanding the Xewark ('X. J.) 
lodge for electing a man said to be a 
negro. 

Held Up I. 0. O. F. Parade. 

Albany. X. Y.. Aug. 20. — The discov- 
er}- of one non-union hack driver held up 
half of the parade and spoiled the mass 
formation of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, whose Grand Lodge is in 
session in this city. There were 7,ocx) in 
the parade, and it had gone two-thirds 
over the march when it was discovered 
that the driver of one of the t^vo hun- 
dred hacks at the end of the fourth di- 
vision was nonunion. 

The drivers thereupon stopped all the 
paraders back of them for an hour. The 
first four divisions were massed on Broad 
street, but the wait became so tiresom.e 
that the body was ordered to move. 

To Enjoin Negro Elks. 

(Special ro the New York Times. 1 

Trenton, X". J., July 23. — When thirty- 
negroes incorporated to-day in the office 
of the Secretar}- of State Sun Light 
Lodge Xo. 114. Improved Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, represen- 
tatives of the Trentour Lodge of Elks 
said they would go to the Court of Chan- 
cery for an injunction prohibiting the 
use of the name *'Elks." 

The members of the new oro:anization 



say that under a recent court decision the 
use of the word "improved" makes them 
exempt from injunction. They intend to 
fight any attempt to stop the new order, 
which is projected to bring negroes for- 
ward prominently in- a benevolent or- 
ofanization. 



SMALLER LIQUOR MEN BARRED. 

Pennsylvania and Kentuckv have pro- 
tested, in vain, against the new rule of 
the Red Men, by which all saloon-keep- 
ers and bartenders arc barred from ini- 
tiation. So far as appears from the item, 
as given in relation to the failure of the 
protest in the recent great council of the 
Independent Order of Red :\Ien. this rule 
does not attect the leading dealers, nor 
apply to distillers. A system of saloons, 
owned by a brewery compan}- or whole- 
sale liquor concern, can now em.ploy Red 
^len who have already been initiated; 
and the proprietors themselves can also 
become Red ^len, by a more regular ini- 
tiation than the rather farcical^ one of 
Theodore Roosevelt. It admits managers 
and wealthy proprietors; while, at the 
same tim.e. it tends to relieve the' order 
of the odium, or to forestall the criti- 
cism, liable to be incurred by admitting to 
local lodges, men kno^\ n in the immediate 
neighborhood as running liquor nui- 
sances, and furnishing police court vic- 
tims. However, the advantage is limit- 
ed, by the necessit}' of allowing those 
heretofore initiated to remain, so long as 
they continue to keep their present mem- 
bership in force. Connection with the 
business, in this small way, is no ground 
of suspension or expulsion. Owning the 
business in a larger way, or serving in 
the employment of wholesale liquor 
houses, does not bar future initiation. 

It is natural to expect, nevertheless, 
that the moral antagonism of Our Xoble 
Order will be urged, in soliciting new 
members, or in fending criticism, be- 
cause there is a rule against admitting 
bartenders. It v.-ould be no surprise to 
encounter, in a bombastic oration or edi- 
torial, a virtual claim that the Red Men's 
lodge is an efficient temperance organi- 
zation. 

Let each sunrise bring a new morning 
of hope to the soul. 



>04 



CHKJSTIA.S CYNOSURE. 



November, 1901 



SCRIPTURE SELECTIONS 



For every one that doeth evil hateth the light, neither cometh to the light, lest his deecs 
should be reproved. But he that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made 
manifest that they are wrought in God. — John iii., 20-21. 

What I tell vou in darkness, that speak ye in the light; and what ye hear in the ear, that 
preach ve upon the housetops. — Matt, xii., 27. 

Jesus answered him, I spake openly to the world; I ever taught in the synagogue, and in the 
temple, whither the Jews alwavs resort; and in secret have I said nothing. — ^John xviii., 20. 

Every plant, which my Heavenly Father hath not planted, shall be rooted up. — Matt, xv., 13. 

And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove them. For 
it is a shame even to speak of those things which are dune of them in secret. — Eph. v., 11-12. 

Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth and the life; no man cometh unto the Father 
but by me. — ^John xiv., 6. - . , 

Neither is there salvation in anv other: for there is none other name under heaven, given 
among men, whereby we must be saved. — Actsiv., 12. • 

Who is a liar but he that denieth that Jesus is the Christ? He is antichrist that denieth the 
Father and the Son. Whosoever denieth the Son, the same hath not the Father. — 1 John ii. , 22-23. 

When He, the Spirit of truth, is come. He shall glorify me; for He shall receive of mine, and 
shall show it unto you. — ^John xvi., 13-14. 

Can two walk together, except they be agreed? — Amos iii., 3. 

Blessed is the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way 
of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. — Ps. i., i. 

Be ve not unequally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness 
with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness? 

And what concord hath Christ with Belial? or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel? 

W^herefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the 
unclean thing. — II Cor. vi., 14, 15, 17. 

And they were more than forty which had made this conspiracy. We have bound ourselves 
under a great curse, that we will eat nothing until we have slain Paul. — Acts xxiii., 13, 14. 



Or if a soul swear, pronouncing with his lips to do evil, or to do good, whatsoever it be that 
a man shall pronounce with an oath, and it be hid from him; when he knoweth of it, then he 
shall be guilty in one of these. 

And it shall be, when he shall be guilty in one of these things, that he shall confess that he 
hath sinned in that thing. — Leviticus v., 4, 5. 



November. 1907. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 205 



MASONIC THEOLOGY 



Following are a few quotations from standard Masonic writers. These writings are accessible to 
ly one; hence the correctness of the quotations may be easily verified. 



Dr. A. G. Mackey, Past Grand High Priest, and Secretary General of the Supreme Council, 
33°, for the southern jurisdiction of the United States, says: "Freemasonry only asks for a declar- 
ation of that simple and universal faith in which men of all nations and all sects agree — that belief 
i n a God and in his superintending providence. This is the only religious qualification required of 
a candidate, but this is most strictly demanded. The religion of Masonry is pure theism," — 
Mackey, Lex. p. 404. 



Webb's Monitor, page 16": "A few private lodges append to the application a pledge to the 
effect that the applicant believes the Holy Scriptures to be of Divine import, etc. All this is 
irregular and unmasonic." 



Webb's Masonic Monitor says: "The meeting of a Masonic Lodge is strictly a religious 
ceremony. * -x- * The Christian, the Jew, the Mohammedan, the Buddhist, the Parsee the 
Confucian, and the worshippers of Deity under every form." — Mon. p. 284. 



"It is Anti-Masonic to require any religious test other than to believe in a God, the Creator 
and Governor of the Universe." — Chase, Digest of Masonic Law, p. 206. 



"A Mason, who, by living in strict obedience to the obligations and precepts of the fraternity, 
is free from sin." — Dr. Albert G. Mackey, Past Grand High Priest, Lexicon, p. 16. 



"To require that a candidate profess his belief in the divine authenticity of the Bible, or a 
state of future rewards or punishment, is a serious innovation in the very body of Masonry. Masonry 
has nothing to do with the Bible; it is not founded on the Bible. Ifit was it would not be Masonry, 
it would be something else." — Chase's Digest of Masonic Law, p. 208. 



Further, let General Sickels, the Grand High Priest, speak: "The lessons which the entered 
apprentice receives are intended to cleanse the heart." (p. 161.) "The rite of induction signifies 
the death of vice and all bad passions, and the introduction to a new life of puritv and virtue." 
(Sickels' Monitor, p. 54.) The "three degrees form a perfect and harmonious whole nor can we 
conceive that anything can be suggested more which the soul ot man requires." (Ibid. p. 189. ) 
Such is Freemasonry as a religious society. 



The reader has noticed one particular feature of the Masonic faith, that it omits the found- 
ation — "Chief Corner Stone" — ^Jesus Christ. It i^ a reiigion that requires no confession of sin, 
no cross, no shedding of blood, no atonement. It is a false religion, and professes to save men 
upon other conditions than those revealed m the Gospel of Christ. O that men would look before 
they leap ! 



2'>3 



CHRISTIAN CY>Os>rKK. 



x.vember. 19«:'7, 



t^Mtorial. 



AN ETHICAL CODE FOR LAWYERS. 

chief of The Waiciiiiia:: .- --s.:e^ ::: 
P«:'S:o:i. siil: re^lariy fur:::;.:.- :?.:: eii- 
trrial for a certain page of that ;cur- 
nal. That one which was used Oct. 3. 
1007. had tlie above caption, and. while 
we would like to copy every wr-rd of 
the article. v\diich is characterizec oy its 



.l^..c 5..C— ^■_-. 



.--C.-^C? ?JCi^-(i- 



ci^ciJ.C^ I'J ^_'C<^-iiv 



use o-crc. 

It Ihrgiiis by recognizing tltat ""At tlie 
recent meeting of the .-Vmerican Bar As- 
sociation in Portland, Maine, an rt/.::;^ 
cc-ie f:r :av\wers was presented :; a 
committee which had been appZ'inred tcr 
the purpose. ^ ^ '"" As tlie ^^ atch- 
nian has often intimated, it is time that 
so'nie action of tliis kind was taiten. A^ e 
have nothing to say against lavNwers as 

cradle law^-ers. >< >^ ^ But tnere are 
also a great many - ^ - ^^rho bring 
reproach upon the name and calling 01 
those lawyers who condemn their con- 
•mict as scVc-c-_. c^ <ii-_- . 

■"There is. hi^vrever. one onncip-c ac- 
ceotei by the proiession as a wno.e. 
which we beneve to be morally wrong. 
^ ^ "^^ It is accepted by the legal pro- 
fession, am m tite practice :-t ciurts. 
that a lav.wer ntay receive a c:n- 
fessiin 01 crime, am yet concea. tne 
knowledge from the oihcers of the law, 
and even use his knowledge to aid the 
crinuna- Oj escape t-ie y.ist oena-t^" tr-r 
his crimes. This is a cirect vic^aticn ot 
the esential standards of moral c:mu:t, 
"^ =^ "^ - And the cama of law -.vdich 
makes one who conceals a crime, par- 
ticeos criminis. or an accomplice m 
crhne. beco-mes utterly without eirect am 
obs^olete. 

■"AA e beueve ana assert tnat it is not 
risrht. imcer any circumstances, tr-r any 
pers<3n. in any calling, to conceal knowl- 
edge of a crime from the officers of the 
law. if the knowledge amounts to legal 
proof. The principle on which this ex- 
emptiC'U is claimed for lav,wers and 
priests and clerg^mnen. will justify the 



actizn if m:bs. which take a suposed 
crinunal. try him, and hTich hini. The 
fundamental fallacy, at tlie bottom of 
all such action, is the substitution of pri- 
vate judgment for properly constituted 
:-ni rutdorized courts. The only for- 
d:: rence between tlie action of a 
- ::d seizes a criminal and hangs 
inm ::■ .. tree, and tlicse who conceal the 
proofs ■ 



'i 1^. c ^. 



the legal authori- 
ties, is. tltat. in toe drst case, the mem- 
bers of the m:':: :::memn the criminal 
on their pmate judgment, and, in the 
seccni case, his friends acquit him. on 
titcir private judgment. Technically and 
le^adv. the two acts are in the samiC 



coimse. 



frz'm the court tlie proofs 
in usmg the attorney's su; 
edge of the facts t: secure 
of those whom thev know 



- " : Or i -O.e been many law- 
: _ _ :• .- \ _ on Lincoln, would 
criminal ;rvrn tdrugh sup- 
ig- this :y tdc practice of 
hit it IS tune tnat tnis an- 
: 01 legal practice 'was 
iie legal profession took its 



cum stances on the side of rio- 
am ''ustice ano tne we^iare 1: 



t IS true, it must ais^j oe tmte 
:masonr\- ceased to swear to cc-n- 
oe. and be. in the same. wav. 



CHURCH AND .MYSTERIES. 

The Revell C'l. has published a 
written by an English author. G 
Pember. iNI. A., who treats partici: 
the Reman church. We repr: duce a 
sentences tliat have been selectei :: 
count of their reference to secret :r 
The Romish church is still closc^d 
nected with secret scvieties. intiv 
the Jesuit, which is accounted thr : 
among those imiern :nes that nu: 
the Masonic and ::ders. 

The societies referred to in tliese 
tations. were not a new kind of or< 



Xoreoiber. lirii>7. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



207 



else new ones of the sa:. 
Bearing- various names, the; 
nectetl ^"i*"^ •i^t^*?'''^n'' dIsccs 
tries, a: - ; 

and fe 

A s: . : 

Smith's ^w ._:- : --: r; : 
suffice to ^- . -. ^-. -- -V : 
tion of these s: . 
ily be amp' ifte ^ - - 

dense :':r i^rs: . 



vere 
rs or 
.^cter. 



•ter 1 8 of 
me. will 
veriiica- 



eitects. 


- :.~" ■: ::: . : " 7 : :: ir. :.; : ^ :' :;- 


nc^:: 


T .'\'^ ---"- ^'. ': ' /-! . -- ^^c-Tie 


se:.- V 


:.«■:- --- .: r : ..;:;:. an" 


a o-ener 
throug. 


.v; rivit}-. ^aana^y scrtac 


•A -r 


.-:.:_ ::;r:^i:_r :: :::t ^:--A-:"g 


.: :-::;:: / - 


-rss 01 the times i\"as brou^t 


: ::^:\: : 


; B. C. 1S6. It was ■ilscz-'r- 



in <jrreec; 



this worsl::; 
:: le vices. 



■/---^. - .\t L>»>jrs. to 

e referred. "'The Gturch. 
lit 1 t-ie ^Ivstenes. scea.-ts 



_: .- : .7: risy to conceive how fo^r- 
:'.\:L^:.- ;.;■. ; stacle was pre5ente<l to 
Christ:?- : the : reanization of the 

Mysteric-. . - :':-r n-nt'ess clubs of 
initiates ha 1 .\\-:: i^^ts in every city 
an _- - -"^7^ "li^aji^e ', "" ever ' 

spe:.7^ : 7'zz--is-. pv^-theistic. Mon- 
otheist: ' i:, seems at that 

time to .:„.- . .::_-.^i against Chris- 
tianitv." • Page 465- • 

"These Xe«3-PlaMn:5ts -vrrkel by 
means of secret scMrie: e~ : : ::-:ri them- 
selves among: the s rs as ii 



riis discipies into their own corrupt so- 
ciet\-: and surreptitiously and gradually 
introduced Pagan cerem«:>nies. images, 

raise doctrines, one by one, into the 

:hes."' 'Page 467.) 
Who. it asked, would pass 

on such com:.. .:..__:. ;ns to the churches 
and gradually induce belief in them? 

to think of . . 

Mysteries. : 
advantagTcs : 



^'lit retain toc 
. would do their 
best to utilize amthing that m.ight p-^s- 
sibly for^'-' ^r- desirable an end. 
* * ^ 7 hypotritically joined 



tnem.seives t:- L.ie chi 


urches witn the de- 


■•berate purp-t-se of 
« Page -3. 

Thus it aoc^ars : 


cormpting them.'' 
:hat. even in earlv 


t:ntes. secret 5':'<::et:e5 


were :ns:aious ene- 


mics 01 the punt}- 


of the Cnristian 


cnurca. 





thev too were bret: 



Lord. 



GHOULS AT AMHERST. 
Lost Gravestone Is Discovered. 
In 1S*:2> the nrsi ^ ixe .:f William L Mvri.^k 
•iied on Spanliing street, a&i the burial of 
her hody was in the small c-enierery nor far 
from the Orient ^i»iiiids ar Pelliam. At a 
i it ter rime a marble stone c«earing an inyrip- 
lion ^ivin? ilte dare of her birth was plac-ed 
at the head of her grave, where ir szood for 
a nnmter of years. Five or six years ago the 
stone, with its marble base, was misled, and 
1:0 rru*:-e of ir «:r»nld t«e found tinrii Sarorday, 
when a workman, who was enza^^eii in mak- 
ing repairs in one of the Amherst ojKe?e s*:- 
oieiy houses, dis^i-overeii in and read the in- 
scription. 3Ir. 3Iyric-k. now nx:'war»i of S»> 
years, has m^irriel azain and is still living 
ar ^Vesr Pelham. 

The abi've newspaper ite:n 15 ain>:-st 
tc»<;' painful t:» preserve, but it reveals 
-.vhat is p«jssible. as an extreme depth of 
hearties sn ess. in that kind of secret so- 
ciety.'. There is here s^omething ntore 
' - :nerely a glimpse of thonghtles sness, 
_:ed for a rrnoment by college br-ys. 
for whom life was reserving later reve- 
lations. Some of these m^ay have read 
names on gravestones, through tears, in 
years that have since com.e. Xo one 
would dare say that such a deed has 
caused no later regrets. But the l<3dge 
keecs its troDhv. after all. as in a hvena's 



20S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1907. 



■den. Secrecy is sacred, whatever is pro- 
faned. 

We hope that we are not giving ade- 
quate interpretation, to what we would 
be ashamed not to regard a dreadful 
thing. In the eye of the law, the act was 
a crime; to those who have erected stones 
to the memory of their dead, have return- 
ed to read on the marble a beloved name, 
or who can realize, through their own ex- 
perience, the tender feelings of the youno 
husband after such a separation, it is 
more than criminal ; it is cruel. A society 
capable of perpetuating such an outrage 
through so many deliberate years, would 
be the shame of any college. It is to be 
hoped that the deed was so hidden by the 
-first criminals, as to be out of sight of 
their followers ; let us grant the possible 
charity of a surmise, that, though not re- 
ported so, the fact was, that the workman 
,made, what, to all, was a discovery. 



Iieiii0 0f ®ur Porft* 



We understand that President Blanch- 
ard addressed, last month, the stu- 
dents of Berea College in Kentucky, the 
people of Louisville, of the same State, 
and those gathered at our Indiana State 
Convention, on the importance of wit- 
nessing for Christ against the Satanic 
.attack through secret societies upon the 
home, the church and the state. 



We regret that the State conventions 
were held so late in the month that we 
could get no report before the time for 
closing the forms for this number. This 
disadvantage can be remedied in a meas- 
ure if the various conventions will ap- 
point reporters for the different religious 
weeklies. 



AGENT PEGRAM'S WORK. 

Portland, Mich., Oct. i8, 1907. 
Dear Cynosure — September 22d, 1 
-preached for the Wesleyan Methodists 
at Clarksville and Berlin. Brother C. L. 
I^radley, a faithful preacher, and loyal 
anti-secret man, is pastor here. In fact, 
it is difficult to. find a very faithful 
preacher who is not an anti-lodge man. 



Holiness, Temperance and Anti-secrecy 
generally go together. It is a rare thing 
to find a holiness man who is not for 
absolute prohibition of the liquor traffic, 
a^d also for frankness, free speech and 
fair play as opposed to lodgism. These 
t^vin evils fear and flee before the preach- 
ino- of the full gospel. Here at Clarks- 
ville, I found some and made more 
friends. I also gave three. Bible read- 
ings at different prayer meetings during 
this week. One person expressed a de- 
sire for salvation. 

The next Sabbath I preached for the 
Free Methodists at Grand Ledge again. 
My sermon on ''Christian Benevolence 
versus Lodge Commercialism" met with 
a hearty approval. Lodge commercial- 
ism in fact does not rise to the dignity 
of business fairness and honesty, while 
Masons and Oddfellows pay in three dol- 
lars to get one out, and the well-to-do 
beneficiaries of lodge insurance appro- 
priate the fees and assessments of the 
bankrupted poor who are no longer able 
to pay increasing assessments, and of 
the conscientious who can no longer par- 
take of the work and profits of inequity 
or iniquity either. In the evening I 
preached to the people of Eagle on "Sep- 
aration from the World." It was well 
received, and as is usually the case, I 
was invited to preach again some time. 

I next went to Portland and attended 
the prayer meeting of the holiness people. 
They have been without a pastor, and 
were somewhat discouraged. I gave them 
a few Bible readings in the evenings till 
Friday. There was such an increase of 
interest and attendance that I was in- 
vited to come back the following week 
and preach for them. 

On the Sunday following, I was re- 
quested to return and preach at Clarks- 
ville again, and also at Berlin Center. 
I find that people who have been accus- 
tomed to good, strong, gospel diet are 
more susceptible and appreciative than 
those who are not. In the evening 1 
showed the evil influence on both saint 
and sinner of being under the chloro- 
forming effects of sinful associations. 
It is not so very difficult to cultivate an 
interest in anti-lodgismi. Quite a num- 
ber here are anxious for some special 



November, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



209 



lectures on the subject. Brother Trow- 
bridge, formerly a subscriber to the 
Cynosure, had not wholly lost his taste 
for it, and concluded that he wanted it 
put back on his mental bill of fare, al- 
though he is well supplied with a variety 
of papers. 

On Monday I returned to Portland to 
feed people who are hungering for the 
gospel truth. I have been here ever 
since, giving Bible readings, and preach- 
ing principally on *'The Difficulties of 
the Christian Life, and How to Meet 
Them." It is encouraging to see Chris- 
tians grow in grace. Several have been 
reclaimed, and others have been estab- 
lished in the Christian life. On Sunday 
■night I preached again on "Separation,'' 
which seems most appropriate of my 
anti-secrecy sermons, for all occasions. 
It was highly appreciated and said to be 
^'just what was needed." I distributed 
some tracts here as well as at Eagle, 
and got some subscritions for the Cyno- 
sure. Yours for truth and justice, 

G. A. Pegram. 



W. B. STODDARD'S LETTER. 

Fairmount, Ind., Oct. i8, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure — I am here to attend 
the General Conference of the Wesleyan 
Methodist church. I find the gathering 
large and the Divine Spirit much in evi- 
dence. Your agent was introduced, 
made welcome, and promised a further 
hearing. This -church body is not large, 
but strong in faith and united against sin 
and sinners. Many of these people are 
reading the Cynosure and aiding the 
cause. 

As expected at the time of my last 
writing, I was given a hearing at Con- 
cordia Lutheran synod meeting in Wash- 
ington, D. C. This synod has many mis- 
sions, that were generally reported in a 
prosperous condition. The position of 
the Ohio synod in antagonism to the 
lodge is well known. Many are finding 
the battle difficult and welcome such aid 
as the National Christian Association is 
able to give. 

A Sabbath spent with the Free Meth- 
odist friends at Alexandria, Va., was 
helpful. On the evening of the 3d of 
this month I addressed those who gath« 



ered in St. John's Lutheran church, Bal- 
timore, Md. It was thought the attend- 
ance would be larger should I return. 
This I hope to do. 

En route west I spent the first Sab- 
bath of this month with our Mennon-.te 
friends at Masontown, Pa. Here I found 
a live, working people, planning for the 
up-building of the Kingdom. It is hoped 
that a new house will soon be built for 
the minister and that the new man vvill 
aid in the upbuilding. Our good friends 
showed the usual kindnesses and invited 
a return. 

Looking into the Mennonite publishing 
house at Scottdale, Pa., I found some 
busy people happy in the Master's 'work. 
The new building is nearly ready for 
occupancy, and will afford much-needed 
room. 

On reaching Wilkinsburg, Pa., I learn- 
ed of the death of my wife's father, Mr. 
James H. Steele, and, of course, tarried 
to attend the funeral. He was a mem- 
ber of the Reformed Presbyterian 
church. His hope was bright, and his 
end peaceful. 

Attendance at a prayer meeting in the 
Reformed Presbyterian church. East 
End, Pittsburg, where Dr. D. C. :Martin 
is the honored pastor, gave opportunity 
to keep in touch with this people. The 
subject for discussion was Covenants. 
While the covenants with God and His 
people were to be reverenced and rejoic- 
ed in, covenants with death and agree- 
ments with hell were to be broken!" 

Coming west through Ohio, I stopped, 
for a night with our Ohio agent, that we 
might plan work to be helpful to each, 
and also to look up friends in Dayton 
and vicinity. 

Last Sabbath found me at a quarterly 
meeting of Mennonite Brethren in 
Christ, held at Georgetown (P. O. Pots- 
dam), Ohio. Here I was given a wel- 
come and opportunity to speak. Several 
acquaintances of twenty years back were 
renewed, thirteen subscriptions for the 
Cynosure taken, and a general uplifting 
enjoyed. This church seemed in a good 
spiritual condition. The sermon by the 
elder, S. Lambert, from the text, "Let 
Brotherly Love Continue," seemed verv 
appropriate and cheering. A little lodge 



:io 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Naveinber, 1907. 



in this town struggles for existence. A 
brother of the ]\Iennonite church said a 
lodgenian had in*ged him to unite with 
the lodge, and keep secret the fact that 
he was a member. The lodgeman knew 
the testimony of the church was against 
his organization. What a sneaky insti- 
tution this, that must seek to make men 
sneaks in order to g-ain members ! 

I spoke last Sabbath and Monday 
evenings to good audiences. Some of the 
people had left lodges and others were 
considering the matter. 

I have been disappointed in my plan 
for the Indiana State Convention, but a 
door has opened. State officers have been 
consulted, and a convention is planned, 
to meet Monday and Tuesday, October 
28th and 29th, in the Bible Training 
School at Fort Wayne. Time for prep- 
aration is short, but God may bless this 
gathering to the good of many. 

W. B. Stoddard. • 



Oct. 19, 1907. 
I w^as given a splendid hearing before 
the Wesleyan Methodist General Confer- 
ence, and the support received in Cyno- 
sure subscriptions was most cheering and 
gratifying. I am going to North Man- 
chester, Ind., where I expect to spend 
Sabbath, October 20th, with friends of 
the German Baptist Brethren church, 
and to address the students of the Breth- 
ren College at that place. W. B. S. 



MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

Pine Bluff, Ark., Oct. 5, 1907. 
Wm. I. Phillips, Chicago: 

Sir — I am just home from Billeagle, 
Lonoke County, Ark. My mission is 
house-to-house work. I never fail to 
speak about the lodges in my visits. I 
met the people of Rev. William Ewood's"' 
two churches. He has turned nearly all 
of his members against the lodges. These 
people told me they were glad to learn 
so much about the secret orders. They 
said they were willing to lose what 
money they had paid into them, to save 
their souls. One man said he was go- 
ing to get him a bank for a dollar and 
put his money in it. He said it cost him 

NOTE: A letter from Rev. William Ewood (or 
Edward) was printed in the October, 1907, Cyno- 
sure, on page 191. — Editor. 



twelve dollars to be "made" (initiated) 
in the lodge, and twenty-five cents a 
month to stay in — to stay in a man-made 
thing ; and if he stayed in it fifty years 
and died twenty-five cents behind, they 
would not bury his dead body, and his 
family would not get a nickel. Pie said 
God made him for notJiing and breathed 
into him the breath of life, and had taken 
care of him when he was a baby, and 
blessed him until he was old enough to 
work and make his own money ; and 
now since he was grown it seemed he 
had to let a. Noble Grand make him, and 
he must work for him the balance of his 
life, and uphold all kinds of devilment, 
just to get to be put in a hole in the 
ground. He said, "I am going to put 
my money in the bank, just like I put 
it in the lodge ; and when I get sick and 
die, I will have money to bury me, and- 
some to leave my wife and children." 
He said, ''God bless the National Chris- 
tian Association." He said, ''Anybody 
M-ho wants to rob the poor, comes out 
in the country with a new lodge, claim- 
ing he just got it out of the Bible." He 
told me they had two new lodges out 
there now, called the "Craftsmen" and 
the "Western Thinkers" — ^both come 
from the Bible. I said, "Well, if they 
ah come from the Bible, they might leave 
the ritual off and just give vou the 
Bible." - 

I tell you. Brother Phillips, 1 am glad 
I got acquainted with your work. The 
lodges are the key to all devilment. It 
is idolatry, and when people go into 
idolatry they are led off" into all other 
sins. The lodges give dances, and cail 
it two-stepping. They meet and open 
with prayer, and end at three o'clock in 
the morning with a two-step— gamblers, 
fi.ddlers, preachers, deacons, class-leaders, 
drunkards, and all classes of women, 
from the best we have to the worst. Our 
preachers in the central district are get- 
ting their eyes open. They all are preach- 
ing against the lodges. The lodges must 
go, and whisky must go. The women 
are waking up to the fact that these two 
curses are damning this country. O, 
Ih'other Phillips, send out another wom- 
an like Carry Nation, somebody that is 
v/illing to die for the gospel's sake. 



November. KM)". 



CHRISTIAN C'xNOSURE. 



:ii> 



One brother took me aside at the as- 
sociation, and said, with tears in his eyes, 
''Sister Woods, when you were showing 
the ritual to that crowd of men I was 
trembling for you; somebody will kill 
you. I know the lodges are wrong, but 
you will have to w^ork with them tender- 
ly.'"' 1 said, ''I thought that was work- 
ing tenderly; I w^as letting them read my 
ritual, and see their signs and grips.'"' 
He ^aid, "You did not notice how mad 
those men were." I answered, "If God's 
Word made them mad, what is that to 
me?'^ He said, ''Well, they were hot." 
I replied, "\\'ell, if they were hot, the 
N. C. A. has got water enough to put 
them out. If they kill me, all right ; 
but they will get hotter than that when 
G(.)d gets through wath them." 
Yours for Christ's service. 

Lizzie Woods. 



We had the pleasure of meeting an 
old friend of the cause. Rev. Cyrus 
Smith, of Leon, Iowa, at the time of the 
reunion of the Fourth Illinois Cavalry, 
in Chicago. We hope to get a few in- 
teresting items concerning the poor 
lodgemen with whom he is acquainted. 



FROM OHIO'S STATE AGENT. 

Leonardsburg, O., Oct. 19, 1907. 

Dear Cynosure — This evening finds 
me at home after a .two days' visit among 
(radical) United Brethren assembled in 
Zion church near Junction City, Perry 
County, Ohio, to hold the annual session 
of Scioto Conference. I received a very 
cordial welcome and the kindest treat- 
ment. Last night I addressed an atten- 
tive audience of perhaps three hundred 
persons. Tracts were distributed, sev- 
eral books were sold, and the Cynosure 
w^as placed in a number of homes. 

Rev. Joseph Hoffhines, of Etna, O., 
exerted every effort to make my stay at 
Scioto Conference count for the cause of 
anti-secrecy. I feel greatly indebted to 
this aged brother for his aggTCSsiVe in- 
terest and encouragement. It would be 
difficult to find a man who is more zeal- 
ous in his opposition to lodges than is 
Mr. Hoffhines. 

I was much interested in meeting that 
venerable old man and wise counselor 



of the church, whom the brethren still 
love to call Bishop— Rev. M. Wright, of 
Dayton, O., father of the Wright Broth- 
ers, airship inventors, who are at pres- 
ent said to be negotiating with the Ger- 
man military authorities for the sale of 
their aeroplane. The Bishop told me 
that he attended, at Pittsburg, the first 
convention of the National Christian As- 
sociation, and that he had been a reader 
of the Cynosure almost without inter- 
ruption from its first issue. Let us fol- 
low his good example and determine to 
give our life support to this magazine, 
which is doing such a grand work in op- 
posing the Christless empire. 

My work during a goodly part of this 
month has been personal effort in. various 
localities near home*, wherever I could 
find a person who was willing to listen 
to a few words about secret societies. I 
have found much to encourage, especial- 
ly in the large number of men who de- 
clare their disgust with the lodges which 
have claimed them as members in the 
past. 

An able minister of the Gospel remark- 
ed to me the other day, while looking 
through an Odd Fellow's ritual, which I 
had for sale, "Well, I paid twenty dol- 
lars for what is in that book." He later 
told me that he once belonged to one 
of the best initiating teams in Central 
Ohio, and had helped confer degrees in 
many towns. An adhering Mason re- 
cently bought a ritual, and after he had 
had it for some days, he told a relative 
of mine that a person could get into anv 
Masonic lodge in the country by the use 
of that book. I constantly find lodge men 
who testify to the truth of the various 
expositions, and declare their contempt 
for this sort of lodge wdiolesale "dead- 
horse selling." 

A prominent Delaware, O., business 
man left his lodge because it cost him 
too much. "Why," said he, ''mv dues 
were only a small part of the expense." 
He asserted that he had paid out many 
times what he could have ever hoped to 
get back. A Delaware Odd Fellow is 
said to have paid one hundred and sixtv 
dollars into the treasury of the order and 
left in disgust. An active church work- 
er had left his secret societies throuq-h 



212 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Noveiiiber. 1901 



disgust. He had frequently visited lodges 
when he was the only man who was not 
playing cards. A common testimony you 
pay for all you get and do not always 
get all you pay for. It costs too great 
a sacrifice of man's better nature. It is 
a financial and moral loss. 

At Marengo and I\It. Gilead I found 
secrecy deeply intrenched, but frienfl-* 
were not wanting. I talked with a num- 
ber of people and left several Cynosures 
to continue the work. 

October loth, I was pleasantly sur- 
prised in having Bro. W. B. Stoddard 
at our home. He always brings cheer 
and hopefulness with him. May he 
come often among us. 

H. R. Smith, Jr. 



FROM BROTHER DAVIDSON. 

Cairo, III, Oct. i8, 1907. 
Dear Cynosure — I have been quite in- 
disposed for some time ; not confined to 
bed, but ailing. I have not been able 
to get about much and especially to take 
long trips. I went to Bloomington, 111., 
by invitation of Rev. E. Hall, D. D., 
pastor of Mount Pisgah Baptist church, 
\vho showed me every possible consid- 
eration. I preached for his church, which 
is well informed. Dr. Hall is a grad- 
uate of the Kentucky State University, 
and one of the best qualified ministers 
of the State. He is an earnest reformer, 
and an arch enemy to the lodge. He 
i? dearly loved by his church and stands 
high with his neighbors. I also preached 
twice for Rev. J. T. Brown, pastor of 
the Second Baptist church, Bloomington. 
He is a graduate of Roger Williams 
University, Nashville, Tenn., an able 
minister and a true reformer, an ardent 
anti-secretist. He was recently called 
from St. Louis to pastor here. I preach- 
ed twice for Dr. Brown, and distributed 
tracts. I also visited the white Baptist 
convention and met a number of the 
leaJiing pastors and gave out a few 
tracts. Revs. Hall and Brown extended 
me a hearty invitation to return and 
jH-cach again for their people. I secur- 
ed a few Cynosure subscriptions. The 
lodge is not so strong here as at some 
places. Before the united efforts of 
these two young gospel giants in the 



lead of God's hosts, old Baal will tremble. 
At Centralia, III. 

there are two Baptist and two Methodist 
churches, but I did not get an oppor- 
tunity to meet either pastor. SecretisiB 
is very strong here. 

At Cairo, III. 

T am glad to get back home. I was 
quite sick during my trip to Blooming- 
ton and Centralia. 

I am still battling against sin here in 
this rum-ridden. Sabbath-desecrating^ 
lodge-cursed city. I think my ministry 
is much more accepted here than I at 
one time expected. I am gradually con- 
vincing some of the best people of the 
evils in secret societies. I shall continue 
to press forward in the name of our God. 
I Vvdll set our battle in array and unfurl 
our banner with the inscription, "This 
world for our God, through His Son 
Jesus Christ." Pray that we may have 
great power over sin. 

I am yours for the uplift of humanit}^ 
F. James Davidson. 



THE LODGE PUT TO FLIGHT. 

Pikeville, Ky., Sept. 30, 1907. 
I have not written you for some time,, 
and feel that I ought to inform you as 
to how the Lord is blessing us in our 
work here. Friday evening, Sister 
Georgia A. Adams and myself were led 
to the street by the Lord laying it on 
our hearts ; we having been excluded 
from the church. We opened fire on the 
enemy in the principal street of our town, 
and God just poured cut his Spirit upon 
us. People from all parts of the town 
came rushing up until there were about 
three hundred people present — so many 
they almost blocked the street. Of course 
the enemy roared. One man ran out 
into the street and tried to howl us down. 
God kept us sweet, and we said to him, 
"And you were hoodwinked?" He said, 
"Yes." "And chained?" "Yes." "And 
saw the skeleton?" "Yes." Then an- 
other secret order man tried to stop us. 
We just kept still until we thought he 
was through. Then we asked him if Jie 
was through, and he said "Yes." Then 
we began to read from a book a vindi- 
cation of Masonic persecution, by O. B. 
Whitford, M. D., and they howled us 



November, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



21: 



down again. So we went to prayer, and 
God gave us the victory. One of tlie 
men asked our pardon for what he had 
said, and the other said he would never 
interfere with a street meeting again. 

Oh, it pays to mind God. We are 
looking for great victory here in the 
power and strength of the Lord. Our 
God has the power to put the enemy to 
flight. We expect to speak out very 
plainly, and I am praying and asking 
God for wisdom. 

God bless all of the workers who are 
standing against the great lodge evil, 
and may the Lord especially bless you 
and your work. 

Yours, and all out for the cause of my 
Master, A. D. Cline. 



tist State Convention at Ardmore, Okla., 
soon, and don't want to lose the oppor- 
tunity to help them find their way out of 
bondage. 

(Rev.) George A. Crtckmore. 



The copies of Modern Secret Societies 
and In the Coils for the library of the 
Oklahoma State Baptist College w^ere 
received a few days ago. 

A seceding Mason w^as at my horn) 
the day they were received, and as might 
be expected, the books were examined 
and their authenticity discussed. My 
friend said the truth was out, and that 
the paths and penalties as given in 
"Modern Secret Societies" (of the first 
three degrees of Masonry) was true to 
the letter. He further stated that he did 
not think the books would remain in the 
Library long^ because the Masons would 
burn them. 

Dr. J. B. Jeter, an eminent Baptist 
preacher of the time of Morgan's mur- 
der, in his book, "Recollections of a 
Long Life," devotes a chapter to the 
discussion of Masonry. Among other 
things, he says: "After years of inquiry 
and thought on the subject, I reached the 
undoubting conclusion that Bernard's 
'Light on ^Masonry' was a substantial 
revelation of the secrets and signs of 
Masonry as they were held and prac- 
ticed in his time." 

A Baptist preacher asked me if I was 
right sure the N. C. A. was not a Jesuit 
organization ! 

Please send me a package of your 
tract, "Church and Lodge," and any- 
thing else you have that would be good 
to distribute to a lot of lodge-ridden 
preachers. I will attend Oklahoma Bap- 




J. CONSTANT WOODWARD. 

Air. J. Constant AVoodward was born 
in the town of Adams, Jefferson County, 
Ntw York, September 12, 1820. It was 
in this town also that Charles G. Finney, 
then a young lawyer, was converted aiid 
renounced Masonry, and began his 
world-wide work as a revivalist. Broth- 
er Woodward was ''born again," giving 
his heart to God, when he was "about 
forty-five years old. /\t the age of twen- 
ty-one, he went to Michigan and spent 
seventeen }ears there and in Wisconsin. 
He then returned to New York State, 
and on September 12, 1861, married 
Mary Stickney. In October of the same 
year lie enlisted in the 94th New York 
Infantry for service in the Civil War. 
August 30. 1862, he received a gunshot 
wound in the right thigh, and was hon- 
orably discharged in February, 1S63. 
His wife died September 12, 188 1, and 



:i4 



CHUlSTlAxN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1907. 



on September ii, 18S2, he married J\liss 
Philomela Trowbridge, of Adams Cen- 
ter. New York, with whom he lived in 
happy companionship for a quarter of a 
century. He died September 29, 1907, 
aged eighty-seven years and seventeen 
cla}'s. 

yir. Woodward was always a strong 
anti-]\Iason. The Cynosure has been a 
welcome visitor in his home for many 
years. He and his wife placed some of 
their means in the Annuity Fund of the 
National Christian Association some 
years ago, and planned by Will that a 
larger amount should be used for carry- 
ing on the work after their present-life 
needs were ended. A pleasant incidenc 
in their life history was their wedding 
trip, which they took to Batavia, Nev\^ 
York, to attend the unveiling of tlie 
]\Iorgan monument. Brother Woodward 
was a very conscientious and devoted 
Christian, and was ready and anxious to 
go and be at rest when the Master called. 
He was like a sheaf of wheat ready for 
the harvest. 



%ttthm' %^lmmm. 



MADE FREE INDEED, 

Headquarters Prohibition County Com- 
mittee, Herkimer County, N. Y. ; J. E. 
Hill, Chairman. 

Ilion, N. Y. 
Enclosed find $1.00 for a year's sub- 
scription for the Christian Cynosure, a 
copy of which came into my hands to- 
day. 

The writer was for seventeen years a 
slave of the devil and all his works. I 
drifted at an early age into lodges and 
insurance organizations. I was a slave 
to them all until, on the 17th of March, 
1902, in DuBois, Pa., in the First M. E. 
Church, God Almighty reached down and 
picked me up, the wreck of a man, home- 
less, hopeless, Christless, dissipated, de- 
bauched, debased. He clothed me in my 
right mind and put a new song into my 
mouth, even praises unto our God. He 
that is made free by the Son is free in- 
deed. Oh, that men and women could 
see or be brought to the light ! I am prais- 
ing God for liberty, absolute freedom in 



the service of Christ, and am praymg for 
our Freemason preachers, whisky-voting 
elders, cigar-smoking deacons, and pro- 
fessing Christians who are trusting God 
for spiritual help and insurance orders 
for financial aid. 'Tf ye abide in Me and 
My words abide in you, ye shall ^sk what 
ye will," praise God ! 

Yours in Jesus' name, John E. Hill. 



rom ®ut liaiL 



That veteran foreign missionary, Rev. 
C. B. Ward, of India, writes under date 
of July 2^, 1907: 

"Your invitation to attend the annual 
meeting- was kind. I account the honor 
of membership among you heroes for 
righteousness far more than being hon- 
ored by some college. 

"I am much pleased to see an increased 
disposition on the part of 'The Christian 
W^itness' (National Holiness Associa- 
tion) to advertise your books, and a lit- 
tle more definitely take position on the 
secrecy question. Dr. Blanchard is a 
man of God. His benign face in the 
advertising columns means much. It is 
easy for me at this long range to discover 
a growth in the anti-secret sentiment in 
America. I sincerely rejoice in it. Yes, 
our much beloved President Roosevelt 
was lugged into it, exactly as Lord Cur- 
zon. late Viceroy of India, as soon as 
he took office. 

''There is all the time some call for 
your literature. I have been disposing of 
the old 'Watchman' stock, and am now 
about out. If the Lord should put it into 
the heart of some one, who has the 
means, to send me about $50 worth of 
anti-secret literature, I will, as I am able, 
scatter it in this, oh, so needy, empire, 
where secrecy reigns almost undisturbed. 

"Remember me in your prayers. I do 
pray for the triumph of the truth over 
all secrecy. It is more and more clear 
that the church in all lands is greatly 
curbed and hindered by the influence of 
secrecy. 

"When opportunity offers, tell the 
brethren that I am with them in the fight. 
I scattered almost two hundred of Wood- 
ruff Post's dying blow at the monster 



November, 1901 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Secrecy. I wish I knew how to promote 
a greater effort at the dissemination of 
anti-secret hteratiire to the ends of the 
earth. It is worth thought and prayer 
that we should make larger use of the 
modern postal system so widely extend- 
ed in all the earth.'' 

Since receiving the above letter we 
have sent Bro. Ward twenty dollars' 
worth of literature. We have lately re- 
ceived an appeal for the contribution of 
several thousand tracts from a friend in 
South Africa. Will not the readers of 
the Cynosure ''pray more and pay more"' 
for this work? 



Rev. J. S. T. Milligan, D. D.., of Pitts- 
burg, is a good friend of the Cynosure. 
He whites under date of September i8th: 

'Tlease find enclosed one dollar for 
Cynosure. Wishing it and the Cause the 
blessing of Him W^ho is the Light of the 
world, I remain, at eighty-two, an abid- 
ing friend." 



THE ONLY MOST WORSHIPFUL MAS= 
TER. 

Who opposeth and exalteth himself above 
all that is called God, or that is worshii> 
ed ; so that he as God sitteth in the temple 
of God, showing himself that he is God. — 
II. Thess. 2 :4. 

The Most Worshipful Master of the 
Grand Lodge of Iowa performed the 
ceremony of laying the corner-stone of 
the new court house now being erected 
at Leon, Decatur County, Iowa. It is 
argued here by some, that if any man 
or set of men can be truthfully styled 
''most worshipful," then God is not most 
worshipful, because there can be but one 
the most worshipful. If it be true that 
the lodge, or any part of it, can be, in 
any sense of truth, ''most worshipful," 
then it is true that Christianity is blas- 
phemy and has no right to be deceiving 
people with the Bible. 

But if the God of the Bible is most 
to be worshipped, if the Christian's God 
is the only true and living God, "and Him 
only shalt thou worship" — then Masonry 
or anything else laying any claim what- 
ever to the title of "most worshipful" 
is blacker idolatry and more Satanic 
than the feeble mind of man is able to 



think; and the most serious mistake a 
man can make is to worship, in any de- 
gree, the wrong god. The only safe 
w^ay is to worship God through Jesus 
Christ, our Lord, and only worshipful 
Master. Cyrus Smith, 

Leon. Iowa. 



LODGISM IN THE CHURCHES. 

Elgin, Manitoba, Canada. 

I have been a reader of the Cynosure 
for a number of years, and must say I 
am much pleased with it for the stand it 
takes regarding secret societies. I be- 
lieve that at the present time there is 
great need of strong preaching against 
such works of darkness. How ministers 
of the gospel can tell men to live up to 
their lodge obligation and they will be 
all right, is more than I can understand. 
Having been a member of a number of 
secret orders a great part of my life 
(having renounced them all when I be- 
came a follow'cr of the Lord Jesus 
Christ), I certainly ought to know some- 
thing about them. So many are led to 
believe that as long as they live up to 
their obligation that that is all they have 
to do. in order to be Christians. Some 
time ago I w^as talking with an Orange- 
man about the great need of being born 
again and becoming a follower of Christ; 
but, like others, he said that if he lived 
up to his lodge obligation he would be 
all right. I asked him what help the 
Royal Arch obligation would be to him, 
where you swear never to have anv car- 
nal knowledge of a Royal Arch Purple 
Marksman's wife, daughter, sister or 
mother, you knowing them to be such? 
He allowed that the obligation referred 
to was the one which was of such great 
help to him. Some time after, in conver- 
sation with a iMethodist minister on the 
same subject, he held much the same 
opinion. 

Xow, is it any wonder that the church- 
es are so dead and cold, when sucli doc- 
trine is taught from the pulpit" In 
Isaiah 58: i we read: "Cry aloud; spare 
not ; lift up thy voice like a trumpet, and 
show my people their transgression, and 
the house of Jacob their sins." Yet wo 
find in a great manv cases that if minis- 



216 



CHKIISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1901 



ters Speak against lodges they are soon 
removed, so great is the influence which 
lodgeism has with the churches. 

I feel that I ought to speak out against 
such things. 

Wishing you success in your' great 
work for the Master, 1 remain, yours in 



your grand work. May the Lord abund- 
antly bless and guide you in the battle^ 
George W. Shealey. 



the Light, 



C. W. Maguire. 



Whittier, Cal., Aug. 17, 1907. 

Dear Brother Phillips: I have not 
forgotten the great work to which you 
have consecrated your life, but pray for 
it every day, and believe our Blessed 
Savior will surely bless the seed you are 
sowing and ere long cause a great separ- 
ation between His own loyal followers 
and Baal-worshipers. My, how the or- 
ders are growing ! Verily the world is 
going after them. 

The Shriners and Daughters of Isis 
had a big time here in Los Angeles last 
]\Iay. The sword and crescent of Moham- 
med adorned ( ?) the head of each mem- 
ber of the Noble Order, but the cross of 
Cavalry had no place in their show. And 
still Christians, who are commanded to 
do everjl^hing in the name of Jesus, were 
l^rominent as Shriners in this gathering. 
It is no wonder that Dr. Dorner of Ber- 
lin declared, "The Church in America 
must stand as one man against Free- 
masonry or it will be destroyed. ' ' 

At an M. E. camp-meeting at Hunt- 
ington Beach, near Los Angeles, two 
vreeks ago, I met an M. E. superannuate 
— -vigorous and strong apparently — who 
candidly said: "The Church will not 
succeed until it separates from Free- 
masonry and all Lodgery." He has 
studied the question and conditions thor- 
oughly, and makes this charge, although 
lie does not dare to raise his OAVn voice 
against the Lodges. Shame on such cow- 
ards and traitors ! 

And strange and sad to say, Dr. R. A. 
Torrey, who did the preaching at this 
camp-meeting for two weeks, had no 
%vord against the secret orders. Why? 
My guess is because the manager of the 
camp, Rev. Pitner, is an ELK! Oh, 
think of it, ye sons of men — a Christian 
minister naming himself a wild animal ! 

I have very much enjoyed the Cyno- 
sure for the past year. Many thanks for 



AN ORDINARY ANTIMASONIC EXPER- 
IENCE. 

From a boy I have been opposed to 
Lodgery. I suppose my attitude was a 
result of early perusal of God's holy 
Word. But nevertheless I was beguiled 
into two lodges. Both caught me be- 
cause of a false conclusion as to my duty 
as one who stood for Temperance. 

Caught by Two Temperances Lodges. 

When I was about thirteen years of 
age, a country lodge of United Friends 
of Temperance was started near me, and 
specious arguments drew me into it. One 
night two men came in very late to the 
lodge, and directly we all saw they were 
drunk. The lodge died in short order. I 
was glad it closed out. 

Owing to a severe injury in my four- 
teenth year, for health's sake I left my 
home to live in California. While there 
I was caught by a Good Templar lodge. 

I was working for the Worthy Master, 
zvho zvas also a member in oMcial position 
of every lodge in tozvn. He was also our 
church clerk, yet was only able to reach 
church on Sunday at eleven o'clock. I 
thereby had opportunity to discern the 
tendency of such affiliations. So I quit 
the lodge and sent them word I had done 
so. Some of the leaders offered to keep 
up my dues if I would continue, but it 
was not a matter of money dues, but of 
higher dues or obligations. 

The last night I went to lodge, in com- 
pany with my pastor, as we passed by a 
newly erected Masonic Temple, he said 
to me: "1 was at the dedication of that 
thing the other day." "How was it?" 
I asked. "Oh, there is no God in it," he 
replied, meaning that the God of the Bi- 
ble was not in it. I was in accord with 
him in sentiment and told him so. Then 
he said to me: "And I have little better 
thoughts of this thing we are going to 
to-night." "Nor have I," I replied. Then 
we agreed to quit it, but to go that night 
to see the show from a critic's standpoint, 
and truly it seemed there was more fool- 
ishness that night than ever before. 



November, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



21' 



So about four or five months is all the 
lodge record I possess. 

Early Impressions of Masonry. 

No one before this had ever said aught 
against Lodgery to me, but God had al- 
ready implanted a horror of Masonry in 
my mind. I had once gone to a Masonic 
banquet, open to Mason's families (my 
father being a Master Mason), and I re- 
member that I listened and observed, but 
concluded it was not as it should be. I 
had seen Masonic funerals — meaningless 
formalism and ritualism, calculated to 
impress people ; but to me it held out no 
attraction. So without apparent cause I 
was ever anti-Masonic and anti-lodge. 

When I was about nineteea years old, 
clerking in my father's store, one of our 
church deacons, also clerking with me, 
and the druggist's clerk, began to speak 
to me of the beauties of Masonry. I only 
knew what God said of such things, and 
so I refuted their claims as best I could. 
My father never said yea or nay to me 
about Masonry. Once I picked up his 
Monitor and glanced into it, but put it 
down as his private book ; and except 
some Masonic works, teaching their doc- 
trines, which my fellow clerks used on 
me, I had never seen any works on lodg- 
ery. 

About 1893, at the close of one term at 
the Seminary which I was attending, two 
brethren cafhe into my room one night 
seeking to persuade me to become a Ma- 
son. These were two preachers. I an- 
swered them that their arguments sa- 
vored of a want of trust in God. At last 
they left me, saying I was too hard for 
them. One of them proved true, the oth- 
er left the church for Dowieism ; quit 
him, and came back to us ; and again 
went to Dowie ; and yet Dowie belabored 
Masons ! 

Masons have often been my friends in- 
deed, and I have brethren who yet re- 
main in the lodge, but who are not of 
the lodge. 

Interwiews with Seceded Masons. 

In 1895 I "^^t an old Baptist preacher, 
who asked me what T thought of Mason- 
ry. I told him I did not believe in it. He 
spoke a few words against it, but upon 
his return home he sent me by mail. But- 



ler's "Hand Book," "Secret Societies Il- 
lustrated," and some testimonies. 

A brother with whom we dwelt tempo- 
rarily brought those books to me, and I 
opened them before him, and began to 
read about the Masonic oath. This broth- 
er said, "I can quote it quicker than you 
can read it." With this he quoted the 
oath as it is printed. I said, "You are a 
Mason ?" 

"Yes, but do not tell any one so. I 
should not have said what I did, for you 
may be a Mason. But I quit Masonry 
when I was converted, left my native 
State to escape the order, and my near- 
est neighbor here, who hates me and is 
a Mason, does not know that I am one.' 

"What if they should know you gave 
me their oath?" I asked. He replied, "I 
would get a 'due summons.' " "What is 
that?" I asked, "It is a call to come to 
lodge, and if I did not go they would 
come after me. Nor would I go, but I 
expect some day they will come after 
me." 

This was the first I knew of the hor- 
rible, diabolical character of the lodge. 

Since then an old, grey-headed broth- 
er told me that for twenty years he had 
not gone to the Masonic lodge. They 
had elected him to office, but he did not 
go. Closing he said, "Thank God I am 
done with that now." I said, "My broth- 
er, have you considered what would be if 
they sent you a 'due summons'?" He 
looked up at me with anguish in his face, 
and said, "No, brother, I had not thought 
of that. I wish to God I had never had 
anything to do with it." 

False Reports and Charges. 

Two years ago I was called East to 
hold some meetings, and while I was 
gone it was reported that I was in the 
Insane Asylum in a certain State. My 
wife wrote me of it. I wrote the said 
Asylum through a friend to know if 
such a person as named was in the insti- 
tution, and received the reply that no 
one of my name had ever been in the said 
institution. With this letter, when I re- 
turned home, I ran the falsifier to cover. 

Other petty false charges have been 
very frequently made against me. and 
their origin has always been in secret. 
But recently a Masonic Baptist preacher 



218 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



NoYember, 1907. 



was asked how to subvert the church of 
which I am pastor, and he rephed: "Get 
rid of your present pastor." 

The same man later went to the other 
church I have pastored, and tried to make 
a }vJason of a member, also bearing a tale 
against me which has neither truth nor 
appearance of truth for its base. 

A brother reasoned against Masonry 
to this Masonic (Royal Arch) Baptist 
preacher, and cited as witness Brother 
IMiUard, of Little Rock, Ark. The 
preacher said: "A man exposing Mason- 
ry as Millard does, if those oaths are Ma- 
sonic oaths, as he claims, would be most 
certain to be killed ; and he is a traitor 
for so doing- and deserves death." EAd- 
dently this was said under an impression 
that Brother Millard had seceded from 
Masonry. But it shows the animus this 
Royal pretender manifests. 

In a Catholic Hospital. 

I once spent a month in a Catholic hos- 
pital in San Francisco, by arrangement 
of my physician. My uncle arranged 
then for my removal to another place. 
About the close of the month the Sister 
Superior informed me that I was to re- 
main there on their charity, as my uncle 
had made no provision for me any long- 
er ; he had forsaken me, he did not an- 
swer my letters, and so I was to /be "of 
them," she said. 

I held my peace, and looked to God to 
help me out. On the morning my month 
was up, a stranger came into the ward to 
see some one, and as he was leaving I 
called him to my bed, and asked him to 
send an expressman to me. He promised 
to do so, and at noon the man came. The 
Sisters tried to send him away, but he 
was true to me, and I was carried on my 
cot down stairs and put in the wagon, 
and taken to another hospital, where I 
got well soon. 

The recent earthquake overthrew the 
Catholic hospital, but not the other one. 
I was glad to come out of the hospi- 
tal even as I had entered — a non-Catho- 
lic, but a child of God. I found that my 
letters had been rewritten, and my un- 
cle's suppressed, all to drag m.e into the 
maw of Rome. 

These are some experiences I have 
had in my few years of life, being now 



in my thirty-seventh year, and a minis- 
ter of the gospel since 1891. 

Babylon and the Beast . 

I am thankful that I got out of the 
Babylonish hospital, but I am more 
thankful that I never entered the Ma- 
sonic lodge. I will suffer, if need be, 
with those who come out from and tes- 
tify against the institutions of darkness. 
Hitherto the Lord hath brought me on 
my journey ; and so long as I live, even 
till Jesus comes, I will tell on the house- 
tops what I hear in the ear, and I expect 
what I speak in my chamber to be told 
abroad. But, friends and brethren, we 
can never wipe out Lodgery ; we can 
only show the saved where they should 
stand, for yet the Beast will burn with 
fire Babylon who rides now on the Beast. 
Then God will consign the Beast to his 
own place. 

Does the R.oman Church oppose or 
suppress Masonry sometimes ? She rides 
the Beast all the time ! Do Masons op- 
pose Romanism ecclesiastically some- 
times ? The rider may gall the Beast she 
rides! Thus we see the conjunction of 
the two. But the Lord Jesus, 'who was 
betrayed by the secretists, gave us His 
word and example, and bade us bear our 
testimony therewith. We may receive 
persecution along the way, for our Sa- 
vior and His salvation are the opposites 
of the god of this world and his pretend- 
ed salvation. They slew our Master, our 
only Master, Jesus, God's dear Son, Who 
died for us. Shall we not follow in His 
steps as He bids us do? 

May Jehovah-Jireh ever bless and sus- 
tain all His servants. 

(Eld.) C. E. Hughart. 

Pollock, La. 



LETTER TO A "D. D." IN PITTSBURG. 

How to live the life of a Christian and 
be a friend of God, you will find in your 
Bible. How impossible it is to live Chris- 
tianity and at the same time fellowship 
Masonry and join in its anti-Christian 
ritual of worship, you will also find ni 
your ' Bible. How to throw off the 
shackles with which wicked men have 
bound you, and "come out from them" 
and use your God-given, commission 
to preach the supreme wickedness 



November, 1907. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUKE. 



219 



you have found in the lodge, all this you 
will find in your Holy Bible. 

When you joined the lodge you did 
it with an object, leaving out God as 
Protector, and Christ as your Savior. 
Have you gained your purpose ? And is 
it worth the expense ? 

You may not have carefully consid- 
ered your position as a representative of 
the Christian church and also of an anti- 
christian association; but if you will do 
so with care and prayer, you wdll dis- 
cover your treasonable life. You are a 
professed ambassador for the Kingdom 
of Christ; you have also accepted such an 
appointment for the kingdom of Satan ; 
and if you are true to Masonry, as I 
know you are, you must be a traitor to 
the Church. I know^, dear doctor, this 
is a hard saying, but what did Jesus say 
of such? "Ye are they which justify 
yourselves before men, but God knoweth 
}Our hearts; for that (Masonry, for in- 
stance,) which is highly esteemed among 
men is an abomination in the sight of 
God." If you think you can serve two 
masters, in promoting the progress and 
spirituality of the church, while obeying 
the dictates of her dire enemy, believe 
me, my most charitable judgment is that 
you are quite mistaken. You yourself 
know that being alive to the interests, of 
the lodge you are dead to the spiritual 
interests of the Church. If your own 
individual concern were all, it were bad 
enough, but spiritual deadi is contagious, 
and under yoin- ministry the religious 
fervor of your congregation will hardly 
rise higher than that of the lods'e, and 
in time you will be to the Church wliat 
the dead fly is to the pot of ointment. 

^ly dear doctor, you may think I am 
severe, but your unholy alliance needs 
plain talk ; and you are aware that no 
sin can be remitted wdiile you wnlfully 
live in it. You know that to believe in 
and practice lodge-life is verv sinful, and 
] ask you. Have you ever sought pardon 
for such sin? You have not, because you 
dare not, on account of your discordant 
life. Imagine yourself on your knees 
before God suing for the pardon of sin 
the committal of which \(xi would not 
give up for the world! If you are a 
Christian vou have no riglit to icjMiore the 



prayers of solicitude continLially ascend- 
ing in your behalf, for your conversion 
to a singleness of heart in the Christian 
life and complete relief from the thral- 
dom of ^Masonry. I wish }OU \\(juld 
make up your mind to attend a conven- 
tion of the National Christian Associa- 
tion, and learn for yourself of the great 
number of great and good men — many 
Gospel ministers like vourself — whose 
conversion to Jesus brought them out of 
and enabled them to renounce and de- 
nounce the accursed thing. These men 
have arrayed themselves on the side of 
Christ and against Secretism Are you 
afraid of Masonic vengeance? Then you 
confess the blood-guiltiness of your -pet 
institution. "Who is he that will harm 
you if ye be followers of thai which is 
good?'' A Christian is a Christ-follower, 
then do not proceed another step in ^la- 
sonry until you are sure }'"U are follow- 
ing Christ. Xo follower of Christ ever 
did or ever will iind Him in a IVIasonic 
lodge, because vou with every other 
Free ]\Iason have given your voice in 
legislating Him out of lodge worship. • 

Dear doctor, what think you of your 
course of life, in wliich, or at the end of 
which, do you ever expect to And the 
Savior of the world — your Savior ? 

^lay God bless you and turn you and 
make you henceforth a fearless cham- 
pion of the truth. 

Your Christian brother. 

Joseph }^IcKee. 

12x6 Buena \'ista St., Allegheny, Pa. 



torn #ttr €Kl)att0e0^ 



TO COMBAT UNIONISM. 

(From Ihe New York Evening ro.st.) 

The action of the National Association 
of Manufacturers, in voting to raise a 
fund of $1,500,000, in the^ next three 
years with which to combat the labor 
unions, is another significant sign of the 
times. It will be denounced, of course, 
by the unions as a corruption fund. If 
any part of it is used for the purpose of 
buying special privileges or interfering 
with the lawful rights of workingmen, 
the association will properly be classified 
among those wliom the President has so 



2-20 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSUKE. 



Noveniber, 1907, 



often denounced as the real enemies of 
the people. AYe do not believe that this 
is the purpose of the association. Its 
members wish to control their own af- 
fairs. They do not object to labor unions 
as such, but to the lack of responsibility 
of their leaders. These men are too often 
corrupt and criminal, perfectly willing, 
in Chicago, to bring misery to hundreds 
of families by calling strikes in return 
for bribes. They habitually play into 
the hands of the worst tj^pes of politi- 
cians, and, as in the Moyer and Haywood 
case, assume the attitude of being above 
the law. Now, if these leaders repre- 
sented all the working people of the 
United States, the situation would be 
different. But they stand for only a 
small minority, who insist not only upon 
a. labor monopoly, but the right to pre- 
vent by force Americans from earning a 
living as they see fit. 



The Great Serpent Has Many Victims. 

The Military Order of the Serpent held 
high revelry in Defiance, Ohio, Tuesday even- 
ing. The streets of this historic old city 
were invaded at about eight o'clock by one 
of the most gruesome parades that has ever 
traveled over the pavements. Little children 
sought the protection of their parents, even 
many of the elders opened their eyes to as- 
sure themselves that they were not seeing 
a chapter of the Arabian Nights enacted be- 
fore them. 

The Great Seipent, which measures over 
ninety feet in length and from whose eyes 
and mouth red and green fire do blaze was 
carried through the main streets of the city 
by his followers. The grand procession was 
headed by the Philippino reed band whose 
music is like that of the sounds of battle. 
Next came the Sacred Ox Cart drawn by the 
Sacred Bull and in which the Keeper there- 
of rode, following this great man. who is 
one of the high potentates of the order came 
the great Sacred Serpent carried by fifty 
or more of his followers. The rear of the 
procession consisted of the victiins of the 
Serpent who were to be fed to him during 
the night. Each of the followers of the Ser- 
pent carried in his hand a wand of fire and 
the parade was illuminated the entire march 
with pyrotechnics of all colors. The brave 
band of followers retracted their steps to 
the Snakes Hall and entered therein. What 
occurred there is not for the outside world 
to know. It be known, however, from the 



sounds that emitted that the tortures were 
great and likewise was the suffering. 

Supreme and State Officers Are Elected. 

At a business session of the order held at 
the Crosby this morning Superior Grand 
Lodge. No. 1, of Cleveland, was organized 
and Supreme (national) officers elected as 
follows : Superior Gu Gu Grandissimus, Chas. 
E. Stroud, Sandusky ; Supreme Datto, Wm. 
Moran, Cleveland ; Supreme Lord High Keep- 
er of the Sacred Amphora, W. J. Schrodder, 
Cincinnati ; Slick and Slimy Keepers of the 
Ophidion, F. M. Fanning, Cleveland; Chas. 
E. Lord, Clyde; Geo. S. Foley, Monroeville ; 
Syl. Garver, Defiance. 

The Grand Lodge of Ohio was also or- 
ganized and State officers elected as follows : 
Gu Gu Grandissimo, Walter McAaron, Xenia ; 
Grand Datto, Wm. Smoker, Youngstown ; 
Grand Thrice Infamous Inferior Gu Gu, Chas. 
J. Heinz, Dayton ; Lord High Keeper of the 
Sacred Amphora, Louis Corecllious, Defiance ; 
Slick and Slimy Keepers of the Ophidion, C. 
Lemon, Toledo ; C. H. Hutchinson, Cleveland ; 
Jerome P. Murphy, Cincinnati, and Fred H. 
Zinn, Sandusky. 

— Daily Crescent News, Defiance, Ohio, Au- 
gust 7, 1907. 



THE "ANTI=FRAT" MOVEMENT. 

[From the Chicago Record-Herald.] 
Attention has been repeatedly called by 
the Record-Herald of late to the endeav- 
ors that are being made by States and 
cities all the way from Maine to Wash- 
ington to suppress fraternities in public 
schools. During the recent legislative 
sessions at least half a dozen States have 
adopted laws prohibiting such fraterni- 
ties, and in several States Supreme Court 
decisions have upheld the right of school 
boards to regulate them by excluding 
their members from school athletics and 
honors as an incident to the general pow- 
ers of administration vested in the 
boards. In Chicago an attempt to regulate 
the fraternities was made by the school 
board some years ago, but injunctions in 
the lower courts have allowed to drag 
along without final decision, the frater- 
nities all the while remaining in the 
schools. 

Various bad influences have been prov- 
ed to rest in the fraternities ranging all 
the way from snobbishness and inatten- 
tion to school work to immorality. Su- 
perintendent Cooley has just made a tab- 
ulation of the scholarship records of fra- 



Xoveiiiber, 1!>0T, 



CHUISriAN CYNOSUKE. 



221 



ternity and sorority members in one of 
the high schools for the past year which 
all by itself furnishes sufficient yeason for 
putting an end to these societies. The 
average marking of 121 members fell 
Just below 75 per cent, and only one of 
the students ranked as high as 90. In 
the three worst fraternities from this 
point of view 13 members out of 21 fell 
below y6 per cent. 

Spreading first from the colleges to the 
high schools, the fraternities are now 
spreading downward into the grammar 
schools. The Ray school is said to have 
already three such organizations. 

The school board should instruct its 
attorney to press legal proceedings as 
rapidly as possible to a finish, and it 
should take whatever measures are with- 
in its power to end the pest once for all. 



ROOT OUT THE FRATERNITIES. 

The Greek letter societies have no 
place in the high schools of Chicago. The 
presumption' of the youngsters who think 
that they are above discipline and school 
law can be cured if the principals of the 
schools use the hard hand. Luckily most 
of them have given evidence that they 
are equal to the job ahead. 

The public school is the school of de- 
mocracy; the secret fraternities make it 
the school of a cheap aristocracy. The 
societies afe not truly fraternal in any 
sense of the word. They make for arro- 
gance on the part of the members and 
they promote jealousies and heart burn- 
ings. The members of the organizations 
hold themselves higher than authority 
and presume to dictate to the city that is 
giving them an education. 

The school principals say that they are 
determined that the anti-fraternity rule 
sha'l be enforced. They are sure of the 
support of everybody save a few fond 
parents who ought to be thrashing their 
offspring instead of encouraging him in 
disobedience. West Point and Annapolis 
are public, schools. A secret society could 
not live in either place from the Retreat 
of one day to the Reveille of the next. It's 
the hard-fisted discipline that does 
things. 

— Editorial in Chicago Evening Post, Sept. 
4, 1907. 



KNIGHTS TEMPLAR OBSERVE ASCEN- 
SION DAY. 

"In full Templar uniform, and bear- 
ing the cross-hilted swords of the order, 
Atlantic City Commandery Xo. 20, 
Knight Templars, observed Ascension 
Day yesterday morning by attending the 
morning service at the Church of the 
Ascension, of which Rev. J. Hardon- 
brook Townsend, prelate of the Com- 
mandery, is rector. 

5!^ -K >H :^ ;;: jj; ^ 

''You are not the linjal descendants of 
the old Templars but a revival of the 
spirit of the past, and like the old time 
Knights you render: 

'Tirst, Christian assistance, even as 
Simon of Cyrene assisted Christ. 

"Second, Christian teaching. Every 
Mason believes in God, and every Terp- 
plar believes in 'raising the exaltation.' 
^lasonry is not a rival but an aid to re- 
ligion, and all Knights Templar are 
pledged to an organized form of religion. 
Therefore they must be churchmen. ■ 

"Third, Christian symboHsm. The 
ancient Templars' shout of victory was 
*Xon nobis domine.' The cross is indi- 
cated by your sword hilts. As the old 
Templars always fought three heathen 
single handed, so too will you sometimes 
have to meet alone the three enemies, the 
world, the flesh and the devil. 

"So live, and so fight, that when the 
Grand Architect of the Universe calls us 
from labor to refreshment, when the key- 
stone is placed in the arch of redemption 
you may receive the blessing of the true 
and stainless knight.'' — Atlaiitic Rcviczv, 
Atlantic City, N. J., May 13. 1907. 

Are the Knights Templar a Christian 
church, or a church of Satan and a rival 
of Christ's Church ? 



The Watchman, May 30, 1907, quotes 
from Hugh Black as follows: 

'"Tlte greatest American faculty is the 
facult}- of organization. It is in the con- 
stitution of the American mind. My stu- 
dents at Cnit^!i can make wonderful ser- 
nii^n outlines, but that is no sign of abil- 
itv to preach a good sermon. So many 
of them can organize a truth but they 



CIIUIS'IUAN CYNOSURE. 



X >V(-.iil;or. VMYi 



can't apply it. And yon are the same 
wa}- in yonr chnrches — you organize a 
society, and when yon can't make it go, 
you organize another society. This is the 
weakest point in American church work 
to-da^^" 



A TRAP SET BY THE POLICE. 

Four Members of the Black Hand 

Captured. 

Fort Henry, N. Y., Aug. 19.— Fom- 
members of an alleged Black Hand band 
were captured here last night by an 
armed posse, headed by Deputy United 
States ^Marshal A. S. Spring. Two others 
were arrested today. None of their 
names are known. Several days ago an 
attempt was made to blackmail a mine 
clerk. He refused to pay the $30 de- 
manded. A few days later he was severe- 
ly beaten by a party of men, who de- 
manded $40 of him. ^ 

A trap was set by the policemen and 
the clerk paid the money in marked bills. 
The police say the four men arrested 
had the marked bills in their possession. 
This morning 25 Italians suddenly left 
the town. The police believed the men 
they have are also wanted for similar 
work in Boston and Albany." 

These seem to be sad times for the per- 
secuted brethren. 



SOME BLACK HAND CONVICTIONS. 

[From the Philaclplpliia Press.] 
The conviction of ii Italians in the 
Luzerne County Court, charged . with 
''Black Hand" crimes, will doubtless be 
followed by exemplary sentences and 
have: a most wholesome effect. The an- 
thracite coal industry has concentrated 
in that region an element much given to 
deeds of violence and intimidation. This 
reached a climax 30 years a.^o in the 
Molly Maguire outrages, which were 
stopped when a considerable number of 
the ringleaders were hanged. Southern 
Italy has sent to the coal region large 
numbers of swarthy men, good laborers, 
but much addicted to the bad habit of 
assassination, fostered and protected by 
secret organizations. 

The "Black Hand" was the symbol and 
the name of the organization to which 
the men cnnxnri-e.cl yesterday belonged. 



They blew up the home of a humble Ital- 
ian who refused to pay money to tiie 
Black Hand society. The punishment for 
this crime, two years' imprisonment, is 
entirely too small. It is unfortunate and 
a weakness in our criniinal law that the 
[•enalty prescribed for most offenses In 
this State is light and permits the repeti- 
tion of the crime after a brief period 
spent in prison under conditions that 
make imprisonment no great hardship. 
The men convicted yesterday have other 
charges hanging over them which niay 
result in their being kept in confinement 
for a considerable term of years. 

Some of the habits of Southern Italy 
are entirely out of harmony with Ameri- 
can civilization, and Italian immigrants 
need to have the conviction enforced 
upon them that it is best to leave ^hose- 
habits behind. The stiletto is a deadly 
weapon with which the Southern Italians 
are entirely too familiar, but when their 
occupation as miners makes them fami- 
liar with the destructive possibilities in 
a stick of dynamite they readily adopt 
that instrument of wholesale slaughter. 
"Dynamiting" is one of the charges 
against the Black Hand convicts. Their 
own less offensive countrymen are usual- 
ly the victims. These crimes must be 
stamped out. They cannot be tolerated 
in a civilized State. 

The conviction and severe punishm.ent 
of these Luzerne County conspirators 
will do much, but the crimes which they 
attempted and committed are compara- 
tively new in this country, and have not 
been directly considered in legislation. If 
oui criminal laws were revised in the 
light of present knowledge, conspiracies 
to murder, blackmail, intimidation and 
intentional destruction by explosives 
would be placed under the sanction of 
nuich severer penalties. 



Heaven is a home, not a boarding 
house. 



Freedom from condemnation gives 
throne rights as well as liberty. 



Faith and prayer are golden wings 
By which we mount to nobler things. 



November, lOOl 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



223 



TESTIMONIES OF EVANGELISTS 



^EV. R. A. WRREY 

Superintendent Bible Institute, Chicago, 
No<w World-Wide Evangelist 

**I do not believe it possible for a man to be an intelligent Christian and an intelligent Mason 
at the same time. ' ' 



WV. GEO. a 8KEEDHAM 

The Irish 
E'vangelisl 

"The mere recognition of the Bible and the mere ac- 
knowledgment of God is not enough, and especially when a 
ritual is connected with heathen ceremonies and paganistic 
initiations, does the profession of a belief in God become 
presumptuous and blasphemous." 




REV. GEO. C. NEEDHAM 



DWIGHT L. mOODY 

"Give them the truth anyway, and if they would rather leave their churches than their lodges 
the sooner they get out of the churches the better. I would rather have ten members who were 
separated from the world than a thousand such members. Come out from the lodge. Better one 
with God than a thousand without him. We must walk with God, and if only one or two go 
with us it is all right. Do not let down the standard to suit men who love their secret lodges or 
have some darling sin they will not give up." 



%EV. B. CARRADINE, T>. 2). 

SM, E. Church, South; 
St* Louis, Mo,, says: 



1 . The method of initiation is wrong. 

2. These secret fraternities are rapidly becoming clubs and 
convivial gatherings. 

3. Secret fraternities strike at the happiness of the home. 

4. These fraternities rob Christ of his glory. 

5. The fraternity hurts us in the matter of church 
attendance. 

6. The fraternity hurts the church financially. 

7. The fraternities have captured much of our preaching 
talent. 

8. The fraternity is used by many as a substitute for the 
church. 

9. Many of these fraternities are striking at the sanctity 
of the Sabbath, 




REV. B. CARRADINE 



GEORGE F. "PENTECOST, A D. 

**I believe that Masonry is an incalculable evil and essentially antichrist in its principles and 
influences. ' ' 



224 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1907. 



STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

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ON FREEMASONRY 

FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
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Master of Unity Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
institution and a critical analysis of the chpiacter 
of each degree, by President J. Blanch.'^.rd, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
notes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
the truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- 
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pages, clotli, $1.00; paper cover, 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
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Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
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trations. It gives the correct method of con- 
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conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the oaths, 
obligations, signs, grips and passwords. All of 
,'hich are correct and can be relied upon. The ac- 
^racy of this work has been attested by high and 
unimpeachable Masonic authority. Cloth, $1.25; 
paper cover, 60 cents. 



OTHER LODGE RITUALS 
AND SECRETS 

REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP I L L XJ S -^ 
TRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, 
Encampment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. By 
a Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, 
and guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a 
. sketch of the origin, history and character of 
the order, over one hundred foot-note quotations 
from standard authorities, showing the character 
and teachings of the order, and an analysis of each. 
degree by President .7. Blanchard. This ritual 
corresponds exactly with the "Charge Books" fur- 
nished by the pov^v-'o-ri Grand Lodge. Cloth,. 
$1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIT- 
UAL. 

An exact copy of the new official ritual 
adopted by the Supreme Lodge of the World, with 
the secret' work added and fully illustrated. Clotb, 
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MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
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Complete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
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"unwritten" or secret work, installation, funeral 
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paper, 35 cents. 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
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CHICAGO. DECEMBER, 1907. 



WeiQslell pi^illipf ^e^himoQv 




''I sympathize with you entirely and 
deeply in your movement against secret 
societies. A secret society is wholly out 
of place under democratic institutions. 
Every secret society, so far as it is wide- 
spread and influential, threatens the pur- 
ity and existence of such institutions, and 
warps them to private ends and class 
supremacy. Secret societies prevent the 
impartial execution of the laws and ob- 
struct the necessary and wholesome action 
of political parties. The judge on the 
bench, the juryman in the box, and all 
the machinery of politics feel the tyranny 
of secret societies. No judge, and no ex- 
ecutive officer, especially in a Republic, 
can, with any self-respect, be a member 
of a secret society. He lays himself open 
to suspicion, besides subjecting himself 
to dangerous temptation and setting an 
evil example. * * * Every good citi- 
zen should make war on all secret socie- 
ties, and give himself no rest until they 
are forbidden by law and rooted out of 
existence." 

WENDELL PHILLIPS. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 
221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



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CONTENTS. 



Xo Fire Water for Red Men 225 

The Masons on Public Occasions .225 

Candidate Balks at Grave in Initiation. .225 
Naturally, Few Men of Character Partici- 
pate in Masonic Ceremonies 225 

Portrait— Wendell Phillips 220 

Covenants. Address by Rev. J. Howe 228 

President Blanchard's Letter 229 

Sermon by Rev. Harry P. Long^ — The Pos- 
sibility of the Lodge and the Church 

Uniting '. .232 

How the Lodge Church-Members Manipu- 
late the Local Church. By Rev. G. A. 

Pegram 238 

A Secret Society Penalty 243 

German Lutheran Ministers Against Par- 
ticipation in Lodge Funeral Services. . .243 
Columbus Day Celebrated by Knights of 

Columbus 243 

Initiate Receives Death Wound 244 

Damages for Hazing .244 

Appreciates Dr. Blanchard's Book 245 

That Big Little "If' 245 

Squirming in Atlanta 24G 

Obituaries 247 

.Joseph Harley. 

.J. W. Suidter. 

Mrs. Gertrude F. Milton. 

.John P. Scott. 

Rev. ,J. I. Frazer. 

Mrs. Lydia C. Andrews. 



Indiana State Convention 24T 

Indiana State Officers 248 

A Call to Michigan Friends 248 

Michigan Christian Association — Constitu- 
tion and By-Laws 249 

Michigan Agent's report 249 

New England Christian Association An- 
nual Meeting '. . . . .250 

From the Ohio StSte Agent , .252 

Secretary Stoddard's Report .253 

Francis J. Davidson's Report f,,..' 254 

Mrs, Lizzie Woods' X^tter 254 



COLLEGE SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Their custom, character, and efforts for their 
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Folly, Expense and Danger 

Secret Societies. 

BY CHARLES A. BLAN CHARD, President 
of Wheaton College. 

They may be rudely classified as religious; 
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ship, the Knights of Pythias, etc.: political, as 
rhe Know-nothings, Knights of the Golden 
Circle, the Order of American Deputies, th^ 
Kuklux-Klan, the White League, etc.: indus- 
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THE CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 

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'Jesns answered him, — I spake openly to the wurld; aud in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XL. 



CHICAGO, DECEMBER, 1907. 



NUMBER 



NO FIRE WATER. 

The great council of Red Men for the 
United States, has passed a law requir- 
ing state great councils to enact, at their 
next annual meeting, a general law pro- 
hibiting the admission of liquor dealers, 
professional gamblers and bar-tenders. 
Some state councils have such laws, but, 
in general, the matter has been optional : 
that is, there has been no law. Where a 
state council does not meet very soon, 
subordinate councils can hurry the ad- 
mission of members, who, after the meet- 
ing, would not remain eligible. 



THE MASONS ON PUBLIC OCCASIONS. 

Vvhat a blot on tlie open, rehgious 
life of the Pilgrim fathers of New Eng- 
land was the Masonic ceremony with 
wihich the late occasion at Provincetown 
was marked : How unbecoming was the 
act of the President in putting on the 
Masonic dress, the- mark of the secret 
society, tg which he belongs ! What of 
tlie crusade against the habit of a nun 
in one teaching in the public school ? 
So at (,'anton, Ohio, at the McKinley 
ceremonieS; what a figure the marching 
Masons made, under the eye of their 
fellow, Mr. Roosevelt! The whole busi- 
ness is out ol keeping with the unity and 
fraternity of a free people, who have 
proof enough in present evils of the bane 
cf secrec}- in the lodges, native and for- 
eign. 
— The Christian Xation. 



BALKS AT GRAVE IN INITIATION. 



Lawrence University Fraternity Candi= 
date Upsets Plans. 

Milwaukee Wis., Nov. 5. — A News 
special from Appleton, Wis., says : While 
being initiated into the Delta Iota frater- 



nity of Lawrence Unixersity lienrv Jef- 
ferson of Appleton was placed in a 
shroud and rough box and carted to Nee- 
nah at midnight, where he was placed in 
a grave and told he would be left there 
until morning. The candidate refused to 
consent to some of the ceremony and 
kicked off the cover of the rough lx)x^ 
which was returned to the undertaker 
this morning in a badly demolished con- 
dition. 



NATURALLY. 

Last summer, a party of four persons 
who called at the Wheaton in North- 
iield, drew out from Brother Stoddard 
an explanation of Freemasonry. Next 
day one of the four accosted him and 
spoke pleasantly of his explanation, in- 
forming him, also, that he had taken the 
two rites in full, and had borne every 
Masonic official title save one. Hq had 
visited the highest assemblies of both 
York and Scotch Rite IMasonry in this 
country and abroad. He hacl also been 
a diligent student of ^lasonry. and had 
made an extensive collection of Masonic 
books. 

This was one of the things he said to 
Brother Stoddard: 

"You would be surprised if you knew 
how few of tlie men of character, and 
especiallv Christian members, take an ac- 
tive part, or ever attended the meetings 
of the lodo'e." 



God leads some men through the twi- 
light and some through, the mid- day ; 
e?ch man according as lie is qualified for 
the vision. Vov weak eyes it is oetter 
that the light be tempered : the strong 
are able to endure. But whether in tlie 
U'orning twihght. the glory of the n-Miii 
or the splendor oi the eventide it is well 
when God leads on before. 



226 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1901 




December, 1907. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Wcnbdi Phillips. 

He Stood Upon the world's broad tlireshold ; wide 
The din of battle and of slaughter rose ; 
He saw God stand upon the w^eaker side, 
That sank in seeming loss before its foes ; 
i\Iany there w^ere who made great haste and sold 
Unto the cunning enemy their sw^ords. 
He scorned their gifts of fame, and power, and gold, 
And, underneath their soft and fiow^ery words. 
Heard the cold serpent hiss; therefore he went 
And humbly joined hmi to the weaker part, 
Fanatic named, and fool, yet w-ell content 
So he could be the rjearer to God's heart, 
And feel its solemn pulses sending blood 
Through all the wdde-spread veins of endless good. 

. • . . — Lowell 



CHlilSTlAX CYNOSUKE. 



December, 1007. 



€outribuiion0. 



COVENANTS. 

BY REV. T. IIO\\'E. 

A covenant is an agreement, a com- 
pact, a promise and obligation, between 
two or more persons, or between God 
and man. 

The covenant may be good or bad. 
wise or foolish. It is not a trifling mat- 
ter to enter into any agreement with an- 
other, especially if there is any princi- 
ple involved. A mistake here may be 
fatal to a man's moral or temporal well- 
being : and to do so withont giving the 
matter serious, sober candid thought, is 
"both foolish and wicked ; for no sane per- 
son has any moral right to enter into 
covenant with another, without first con- 
sidering the right-ness or wrong-ness of 
the act — the divine approval and that 
of a clear conscience. 

It not only shows a lack of common 
sense, but it is positiveh,' wrong- to enter 
into covenant agreement with another, 
without knowing fully the terms of the 
agreement and its requirements. It is 
Avritten in Lev. 5 -.4, "If a soul swear, 
pronounce with his lips to do evil, or 
to do good, whatsoever it be that a man 
shall pronounce with an oath, and it 
be hid from him ; when he knoweth of 
it, then he shah be guilty in ore of 
these."' A confession of the sin fol- 
lows. If such was regarded as a moral 
wrono- under the Levitical law, surelv it 
is no less so under Xew Testament stand- 
ards. Besides, here is hope for the peni- 
tent, even under the old law; but, ac- 
cording: to the standards of the secret 
lodge covenant it is an unpardonable 
sin. Only God alone, who is absolutely 
righteous, mav recjuire conditions of full 
surrender, "Without mental reserva- 
tion.'* yet in the covenant between man 
and his Lord and ^Master, no condition 
or requirement is withheld from him at 
any time. It is v^rong to enter into cove- 
nant with evil men — to be "L^nequally 
yoked together with unbelievers," and it 
is alsrj wrong to require iinreasonable 
conditions in a covenant. 

Lot*..5. Kinof of France, was once 



taken prisoner by the Sultan. Terms 
of peace were made ; and, to assure that 
the terms would be complied with, the 
Sultan declared that he would renounce 
iMahommed if he should fail to keep 
them, and required Louis to renounce ■ 
Jesus Christ. Louis rejected, and de- 
tested the profane proposition, saying, 
"I would rather die than make such a 
covenant." The Sultan, surprised at his 
fidelity to Christ, accepted his word 
without the profane condition. 

I once knew a minister in an ortho- 
dox and popular church, who was chap- 
lain of a lodge, and accustomed to prav 
in the lodge in the name of Christ, and 
declared his purpose to continue to do 
so, even though objections were made. 
Later a Jew objected to the lodge preach- 
er's prayer; the preacher protested, but 
the lodge sustained the Jew, because his 
objections were according to ritual, and 
the preacher submitted, and therefore 
denied his Lord. King Louis kept his 
covenant with Christ, though a prisoner. 
The minister, claiming to be a free man, 
denied Him. 

The recklessness of the age in making 
and breaking covenants in social, domes- 
tic, political and church life, is debasing, 
corrupting and alarming ; and what is 
more responsible for this than the secret 
lodge system? 

The Bible represents the Divine mind 
regarding covenants between God's peo- 
ple and those who are not, as follows : 
"Thou shalt make no coA'enants with 
them, nor with their gods. They shall 
not dwell in thy land, lest they make thee 
sin against me : for if thou serve their 
gods, it surely will be a snare unto thee." 
Ex. 2T) :;^2, ;^T,. "And ye shall make no 
league with the inhabitants of this land ; 
ve shall throw down their altars ; but 
ve have not obeyed my voice : why have 
ve done this?" Judges 2:2. "Ephriam 
feedeth on wind, and followeth after the 
east wind ; he daily increaseth lies and 
desolation ; and they do make a cove- 
nant with the Assyrians, and oil is car- 
ried into Egypt." Hosea 12:1. Ready 
to sacrifice principles, and disobey tli£ 
God of Israel for commercial gain. To 
be "L^nequally yoked together with un- 



L>ec-eiiiber. 1007, 



CHRISTIAN CYxVOSURE. 



:2r) 



believers"" in covenant agreement, is for- 
bidden . in the Xew Testament. 

^Iv ancestors were mostly Orange- 
men, who hated Popery and fought for 
Protestant liberty. I had strong inclina- 
tions to follow in their footsteps; -but 
my conscience would not consent to the 
taking of an obligation, and entering into 
a covenant blindly, so I never became 
an Orangeman, but have endeavored to 
be true to my Protestant principles, not- 
Avithstanding. 

Xo gaod cause needs hidden or unrea- 
sonable Tequirements in its covenants, 
and no wrong covenant condition should 
be made or kept. 



PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 

Dear Fathers and Brethren : 

Since my last letter I have been over 
a large portion of our country, and have 
had opportunity to study the work of the 
secret empire still further. I find it evil, 
always evil, and only evil, and I feel 
moved to testifv more continually than 
ever before against it. I hope that each 
one to whom this writing ma\- come will 
be of like mind, and that in humble de- 
pendence upon God, we may go forward 
more diligently than ever before. 

A few days ago I was attending by 
special request a meeting in Louisville, 
Ky. A friend gave me 350 copies of 
Finney's boek on Free Masonr}', to be 
distributed gratuitously to the members 
of the conference. These books cost him 
nearly $100. I presented myself to the 
officers of the convention, stated my er- 
rand, and asked for an opportimity to 
address the conference briefly, and to 
present these books. 

Every member of the union \\hom I 
met, expressed hiniself as decidedly op- 
posed to secret societies. They all seem- 
ed willing and glad to have the books 
distributed to the members, but they -did 
not wish the subject even named in the 
meeting, and I came away without that 
opportunity. 

I mention this for two reasons. In 
the first place it shovrs the deadly charac- 
ter of the opposition to our movement. 
"Let us alone." was the cry of the de- 
mons in tlie dav of cur Lord, and "let 



us alone,"" is the cr\- of the ckmons still, 
and this cry is so loud and clamorous, 
that good men and women are affected 
Iw- it. 

Those who loathe and abhor secret so- 
cieties, who ijelieve them to be anti- 
Christian a"nd wicked, dread to ha^'e them 
even mentioned in meetings which they 
conduct. 

\n my last letter I spoke 01 the same 
feeling as manifested in a distant state. 
Idolatry is a world-wide movement. 
Satan has no practical objection to our 
antagonizing some of his v.orks, if we 
allow this, the most deadly, and the 
greatest of them to remain. 

To save a few* drunkards or gamblers 
is a great work. Heaven rejoices when 
one sinner repents, but Satan could well 
afford to have a half dozen, or a dozen 
scores of drunkards saved a year, if 
thereby he could secure uninterrupted ac- 
cess to the souls of men by false wor- 
ship. 

The decisicn. which I think ought to 
be aroused in our minds b}' this fact is, 
that as for ourselves, we will not pemiit 
the truth in regard to an\' subject what- 
ever to be suppressed. Wt are all of us 
tempted from time to time to keep back 
truths, which we know men need. We. 
fear, that it will in some way injure us 
or our work. It seems as if we should 
be doing harm to some good cause if we 
freely utter the truth, even though we 
should do so in a kind and loving way. 

All such compromises are contrary' to 
Christian faith and duty. That we ought 
to be kind, patient, loving and brotherly, 
is surely true, but to keep back truths, 
which the world needs for the sake of 
money or friends, is to repeat the sin of 
Judas. He did not wish to hurt Jesus, he 
\\ anted to get money. If he could have 
g-otten the money without selling Jesus, 
he would have done so. P)Ut he thought 
that he could not get that silver unless 
he could sell liis Lord, so he sold Him. 
I am sure that no one of us desires to 
come under his condemnation. Let us 
tliereiore in our social relations, in our 
church relations, in our political and ec- 
clesiastical relations, on every proper oc- 
casion warn men to have no fellowship 
with these untruthful works of darknesi. 



230 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December. 1901 



Jesus did this, and though it cost Him 
His Hfe. He "saw the travail of His 
soul," and He "was satisfied." 

There has recently come to my knowl- 
edge a very interesting fact regarding 
the methods of the labor unions in carry- 
ing on their work, which I think I ought 
to share with you. I have not time to 
repeat what I have often said, that I be- 
lieve in the right of laboring men to or- 
ganize. I would not object to going 
farther and saying that I believe in the 
duty of laboring men to organize. I 
think that in an}' community where the 
number of emplo3'es is large, they should 
combine for companionship of healthful 
sort in a legitimate way. But when la- 
bor unions become secret, they become 
corrupt, and the depth to which they wall 
descend can only be known by the all- 
wise God. But the story was this : 

A friend of mine in Chicago employed 
in his shop a skilled workman, who be- 
longed to a union. A strike was ordered, 
and this workman left his bench and went 
into the street to do picket duty. He 
had no grievance with his employer, he 
was perfectly satisfied and happy with 
him, but he was ordered to g'et out and 
he went. He had a wife and six chil- 
dren, and he lived in an apartment for 
\\'hich he was paying $25 per month. 
When the labor union ordered him out of 
the shop and onto the street, they did 
not give him one dime to pay rent, or 
to buy clothes and food for himself, his 
wife, or his children. My friend, his 
former employer, heard of this, and sent 
him a check for $25, and a note, saying, 
that he would send him $25 each month 
for the support of his family, while the 
strike continued. After some months he 
omitted to send the check. The work- 
man called upon him by phone and asked 
him about it. He said, "That is all 
right, you come over to the office, and 
I will give you the check."' The man 
immediately came over to the office of 
my friend, and he, according to his prom- 
ise, handed him the check for $25. 

This had hardly occurred, when a spy 
from the union came into the office. The 
workman saw him, and ran into the back 
part of the store. The spy waited for 
a trme and then went away. Shortly 



after the workman also left the store,, 
but as he reached the door, he was seiz- 
ed by two spies of the union, who com.- 
pelled him to go with them to the head- 
quarters of the union. After having got- 
ten him over there, they searched his 
pockets and found this check. They 
pounded liim until he w^as well nigh dead.. 
For more than a week he was not fit 
to leave the house, and told him that if 
he had any more to do with his old em- 
ployer, they would kill him. 

After six months the strike was de- 
clared off. That workman is in the office 
of my friend at this time. He is also' a. 
member of that union. Every month,, 
every week, he spends part of his wages 
to support these men, who kept spies on 
his track, who made him work as a 
picket, without any pay or help, and who- 
threatened to kill him, if received any 
assistance from his employer. 

I said to my friend, w^ho told me the 
story, "Why does this man continue with 
the union?" He said, "He is afraid not 
to." 

There are many things connected with 
this matter, which I 'wish to speak of, 
but which T must omit. Allow me to 
speak of one other effect of the union' 
movement. 

In carrying forward our work, I am 
compelled to purchase from time to time 
certain articles in Chicago. I have fre- 
quently received letters from distant 
cities, offering the same articles from 
;^3 1-3 per cent to 50 per cent lowTr than 
I can secure them in Chicago. Making 
arrangement for some of these articles 
to-day, I said to the gentleman with 
whom I was transacting the business, 
"Wdiy is it, that I can send five hundred 
or a thousand miles, and get the goods 
so much cheaper than you offer them?" 
He said, "It is because of the unions here 
in Chicago. We have to pay men more 
here than they do in other cities, and 
w^e must charge you more in order to pay 
them." 

In connection with this outrage on the 
right of tlie individual, and this destruc- 
tive influence upon the mterests of the 
towns where the unions exist, we are to 
remember that the essential .principle of 
unionism is a violation of the common 



DeeeiiJjer. 1!>07. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



231 



sense of mankind and the laws of the 
imi\erse. God has made men to differ 
intellectually and physically. Some have 
more, others have less power. It is a 
clear dictum of rea^^on, that persons whcj 
can do less, will earn less. But the union 
reduces all men to the same level, and in 
order to prevent the capable and ener- 
gQtic man from reflecting upon the stupid 
or the slothful, the amount of work 
^vhich one man may do, is limited to 
what the least capable, the least energetic 
can perform. 

The spectacle of able bodied, capable 
men, trying to spread out the work which 
the}' can do in a half day, over a wdiole 
■da}', so that they may not exceed the 
standard day's work, is a pitiable one. 

But I have already spent more time 
on this subject than I intended. Bet us 
pra}', that God ma}" speedilv free the 
mechanic classes of our country, from 
the injustice, cruelty and degradation of 
this slavery. It is a horrible thing", that 
a man with a wife and six children 
should be the bondman of a group of 
murderers, who pound and kill in the 
name of fraternity. 

Another fact has come to my know 1- 
edge this month, which I wish to share 
with you. It relates to the lodge insur- 
ance movement, which, as you all kno^v^ 
IS the great secret society enterprise of 
our time. -Two of my -friends, some- 
thing like tw^enty years ago, united with 
a secret society. Each of them took out 
a certificate for benefits in case of hi^ 
death. Each of them agreed to pav to 
the insurance lodge a certain amount of 
money every m.onjh. This charge, which 
they took upon themselves, amounted to 
something over $60 per year, and the}- 
have paid this sum of mone}' now for 
just about twenty }-ears. They are neither 
of them old men as yet. But one of 
them is past 50, approaching 60, and 
the lodge of wdiich he is a member, and 
to uhich he has faithfully paid his dues 
every month for twenty years, is be- 
coming anxious about him. Tlic}- recent- 
ly sent him a communication in wdiich 
they notified him of a decided increase 
in monthly dues, they being nearly 
doubled. Instead of paying $60 ever}- 
vear, thev wished hini to pav in the 



neighl3orhood of S140. If he does not 
choose to pay this, he can work away 
on his present -charges until he is 65, 
when he will be required to pa}- $24.80 
per month plus council dues of 40 cents 
for the rest of his life. That is, they 
w-ish him, after he is 65, to pay tw-elve 
times $24.80 annually, in order to keq:> 
his insurance good. The}- sign all their 
letters, '"fraternally }ours." Ordinary 
highwa}- robbery is honorable compare*! 
with this metiiod of dealing with men. 

A\'hen they are young and earning 
money, they sacrifice in order to pay their 
dues. They keep this up for ten years, 
twenty years, thirty years. As years in- 
crease, and earning power diminishes, 
their taxes are increased, and directly 
without as much as ''*by your leave,"' 
tlie}- are told, that when they are 65 
}-ears of age, unless they w-ill pay more 
than $300 per year for this "fraternal'' 
insurance, their certificates will be can- 
celled, their payments will be embezzled, 
and they will be left to get on the best 
they can. 

The nwrtality has been so great among 
the insurance lodges, that those that now 
exist have been trying to be as careful 
as possible. They wish to levy on the 
trafiic as much tariff as it will bear. That 
is, to make the taxes as high as men will 
pay and not forsake the orders. 

But the whole financial basis is wrong. 
and the whole list of these organizations 
must perish in time, or else take some 
means to live like the one whom I have 
pre^•iously described. 

A similar instance came to my know 1- 
edge to-da}'. A friend of mine, a Chris- 
tian minister, was a member of one of 
these organizations, the Royal Arcanum, 
I believe it was. He wished to transfer 
his membership from Chicago to a sub- 
urban town. In making out the papers 
for the change, a discrepancy was found 
as to his age. . The Chicago lodge re]x>rt- 
ed him to be tw-o years younger than he 
reported himself to be to the suburban 
lodge. He said to the lodge man. 'T do 
not understand this, I gave mv a-^c cor- 
rectly to the Chicago lodge, if the}- did 
not record it correctly, I am not to blame 
for that, and I am willing to pa}- what 
is required for lu}- actual age." B)Ut he 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1007. 



Vv'as getting- to be an old nian, his hair 
was a httle wliite. and the lodge man 
said. "Xo, we cannot continue yonr in- 
surance." So they dropped him from 
their rolls, and kept all the money which 
he had paid. 

The whole list of labor unions, fra- 
ternal insurance companies., and other 
secret societies are examples of high 
finance. Officers are supported at large 
expense, offices are kept up, wihile work- 
ingmen are taxed to support the idle, 
the worthless, at times the criminal. The 
murders in Idaho and vicinity now num- 
ber scores and there has not as yet been 
one person convicted. Why is this ? Why 
cannot men who make bombs and plant 
them in g-arden paths or under railway 
platforms be found and punished? It 
is because the murderers are united in 
secret organizations. They learn to do 
their deadly work imder cover of their 
lodge oaths and they consider perjury a 
virtue where the false oath is sworu in 
defense of their order. The religion of 
Cain always kills. Satan the god and 
grand master of all secret lodges is a 
liar and a murderer from the beginning. 

I should be very sorry, however, if one 
person should receive tlie impression that 
the business dishonesties of these lodges 
are the chief objection to them. ' In our 
city recently, a godly man who has been 
a member of one of these organizations 
was in conference with a pastor. The 
minister said, "Let us not argue this 
matter, here is 2 Cor. 6:14-17. Let us 
ask God if He wishes Christian men to 
be members of organizations like this." 
Both knelt in prayer and when they 
arose, the brother who had been a lodge 
member said, "My friend, it is all set- 
tled ; I will have no more fellowship with 
the ungodly men in this order." 

Thousands of good men to-night are 
suffering in their moral and religious life 
because of their fellowship with godless 
men in the secret lodges of our age. 
Some of them become drunkards and 
gamblers, some of them become infidels 
and worldlings, some of them become 
backslidden, indifferent Christians. 

Jesus Christ says, '*You cannot serve 
God and Mammon." The Holy Spirit 
savs, that the believer has no communion 



with the unbeliever. It is absolutely sure,, 
tliat men who wish to belong to God,, 
must come out from these organizations, 
and be separate, and it is the duty of 
every man who is a disciple of Jesus 
Christ, every woman who has a hope of 
eternal life through Llim, to bear testi- 
mony, and let the light shine. If we do 
so, God will care for the witness and for- 
Llis words. Charles A. Blanchard. 



SERMON. 

BY REV. HARRY P. LONG. 

Text: "Can two walk together except 
they be agreed?" Amos 3:3. 

My dear hearers, has God apologized, 
to you for the message He sends to 
you to-day? If not, then far be it from 
me, as that messenger, to apologize for 
tlie glorious messiage I bring. But ' if 
some have come expecting to hear an 
apology from me, rather than disappoint: 
any one, I will offer an apology. I will 
apologize for the little love 1 have shown 
for many an immortal soul ; for had my 
love for every soul been what it should 
have been, this would be my fifth com- 
plete sermon on this subject instead of 
my first. 

Out of respect for the lodge members 
who are showing commendable interest 
by being present here, let me say that 
whatever reference I am compelled to 
make to the teaching or practice of any 
organization will be made only on such 
authority as is recognized by the national 
grand lodges. From this it v/ill follow, 
that the better poste